Atmel-ICE_UNO-minimal-circuit_no-power

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I made an Arduino UNO minimal circuit on breadboard, and want to ICSP it, but I tested, there was no power through ICE, why?

 

Atmel-ICE_UNO-minimal-circuit_no-power

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The ICE detects (that is, it requires) the target power so it knows what logic levels to drive for programming.

 

Edit: parenthesis statement

David

Last Edited: Sun. Jul 26, 2020 - 11:27 PM
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Atmel programmers do not supply target power, but rather measure it to provide the correct interface level.

provide target power externally.

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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Note, most AVRs have two sets of power pins, both must be fed, and 100nf bypass caps are required as close to the pin pairs as possible!

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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You need to supply power because that is the way AVR programmers are (almost always) built. That is the only answer that is needed.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Your crystal wires are waaaaay too long. The crystal must be very close to the AVR. You also need some bypass caps on the power pins.

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#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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ka7ehk wrote:
that is the way AVR programmers are (almost always) built

and is common for other programmers, too.

Top Tips:

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MianQi wrote:
... there was no power through ICE, why?
Not required of an Atmel-ICE; required of Power Debugger and MPLAB PICkit 4.

Target Voltage Supply (VOUT) | Power Debugger

Debugger Powered | MPLAB® PICkit™ 4 In-Circuit Debugger User's Guide

 


edit :

Power Debugger | Atmel Studio 7

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 27, 2020 - 11:41 AM
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You are off to a great start, but I'd suggest, (as above), a few changes to your setup.

 

Put the Crystal as close to the micro as possible, as shown above, (not connected by long wires).

In the above photo the Xtal's caps could also have their leads shortened...

 

You need by-pass caps, typically 0.1 uF, again as close to the micro's pins as possible.

In the above photo there is a small yellow cap in the breadboard holes next to the micro's pins, just to the left of the Xtal.

You can see the Red(+) and Black(-) power supply wires going to the micro.

 

On the opposite side of the micro is a partly hidden, dark red / maroon colored by-pass cap, next to the micro, and another red and purple power supply wires.

 

(For the record, the older STK500 programmer DID / DOES supply V+ to the micro, and the STK600 has that capability.

That was a major point of confusion when I first started programming AVRs!

Many other programmers just read the target micro's operating voltage.)

 

JC

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DocJC wrote:
(For the record, the older STK500 programmer DID / DOES supply V+ to the micro, ...
80mA from a STK500v2 programmer :

Pololu - 8. Using VCC or VBUS to supply power via Pololu USB AVR Programmer v2.1

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Resolved, solution is: 12v + 7805

https://ibb.co/7SVqM4d

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MianQi wrote:

Resolved, solution is: 12v + 7805

https://ibb.co/7SVqM4d

 

Not really, you are ignoring the comments about the wires to the crystal and the need for capacitors.

 

You might be able to program your chip (sometimes) but your circuit WILL be unreliable.

 

Why do people ask questions and then ignore the answers they get?

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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I noted your comments about the wires and capacitors, since till now all the projects used in this way were OK, so I thought it would be enough.

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Resolved, solution is: 12v + 7805

With the added facility of having a mini egg fryer depending on the current used.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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egg fryer ? would it be so hot ?

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It depends on the current used, do the maths. If the power pack is regulated 12V you will have 7V difference X current= Watts.

 

@100mA you will get 0.7W, without a heat sink it will burn your fingers. 5V regulators are happy with about 7.5V input (or less for a low drop out regulator)

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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This is the advanced edition(since 12v was there, so just use it now):

 

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Last Edited: Tue. Sep 8, 2020 - 10:01 AM
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Nice job!

That is a much better layout!

 

JC

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Be careful when working with LiPo batteries! Your wiring will cause a fire if there's a short circuit somewhere. Insert a fuse or other form of protection