ATMEL CPLD

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Hello!

I would like to get started with CPLDs, and as I have used ATMEL's uC-s, and liked the way the company treats its clients, good documentation, and the like, I think I would like to stay with Atmel's CPLD products.

However, I have no idea where to find some good tutorials on getting started with CPLDs, and I wonder, if my good old JTAG ICE (mkI) programmer could be used to program the CPLDs (they are both JTAG after all), or will I need another programmer? If so, where can I get a cheap one, or can I make one myself (I made my JTAG mkI myself, found some good schematics, and all)? :)

Regards,

axos88

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I also wanted to try Atmel's programmable logic devices. And I looked for available tools. Turns out that latest available version of IDE is from 2005. Seemed outdated to me (not to mention that after installation I was not able to run it, it crushed every time at startup).

I'd recommend Xilinx. Theirs USB-JTAG cable is pretty expensive, but Digilent produces a lot of boards with this cable on board. And sometimes separate cable costs more than whole development board with this cable on board.

If LPT still is option for you then cable can be built from couple of transistors.

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

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Any JTAG adapter will program Xilinx parts -- I use the same Amontec JTAGKey for ARMs of various sorts and xilinx parts without any problem.

The issue with xilinx tools is the bloat. Several gigabytes of it, even to program the smallest CPLDs...

Author of simavr - Follow me on twitter : @buserror

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buserror wrote:
Any JTAG adapter will program Xilinx parts

Program, yes. But there is also a lot of debugging tools like ChipScope which help a lot in complex projects (FPGA assumed, complex project for CPLD is something one can figure out with pen and paper :) )

buserror wrote:

The issue with xilinx tools is the bloat. Several gigabytes of it, even to program the smallest CPLDs...

Not that big problem. And they at least work.

I'd like to run Atmel's IDE just to watch. But it does not work under WinXP at work and I have linux at home so it does not work there either :)

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

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I prefer the Altera MAX II CPLDs to those from Xilinx. They are actually small FPGAs with on-chip configuration memory, but Altera calls them CPLDs for marketing reasons. The Altera software is much easier to use than Xilinx's.

I've designed a simple DIY version of the Altera ByteBlaster.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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I still have a MAXII devboard that I got when they were spanking new, the device on it is an ES version (Engineering Sample); and one Cyclone FPGA board I have also has an ES chip on it. I never got round to do anything useful with the MAXII devboard though :(

A few days ago I checked which MAXII devices Farnell sell, but they only sell them in waffles of 45 at a time :(

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They are available in ones, here in the UK.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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I looked again, and Farnell NL does them in single quantities too. I searched for 'MAXII' which only returns the waffles, searching for 'MAX II' yields better results :)

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Here's a little Xilinx CPLD board I designed some years ago:

http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller/pld_starter.html

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM