Atmega devices with usb capabilities

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Good night to everyone, are there any atmegas with built-in usb capabilities in dip packages?
Sorry being so annoying and I think this post is in the wrong section, but this one seemed the most logical one :oops:

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Hello,
no, not as far as I know. Have a look onto there parameter page.

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They do not have "mega" in their name, but there sure are 8-bit AVRs with memory and peripherals similar to the ATmega AVRs. Look for AT90USBxxxx.

Keepcool: Where on Atmels site did you mis-navigate to not find those? (Like www.atmel.com --> Products --> AVR® 8- and 32-bit Solutions --> Devices --> megaAVR, and there they are...).

EDIT: Oh... I missed the DIP requirement? Sorry for any confusion. :oops:

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Last Edited: Thu. May 13, 2010 - 09:51 AM
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What package do the relativey new mega16UN and mega32UN (N=2/4) come in then?

EDIT: nope sorry they are QFN/TQFP as well - so it looks like none of the USB enabled AVR8s are in PDIP.

One can of course do:

http://www.obdev.at/products/vus...

but the CPU will spend a lot of its life doing USB with not a lot left for anything else.

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At least one other manufacturer makes USB devices in DIL.

[this is (I believe) actually one occasion where it would be valid to mention them - Leon Means Microchip PIC chips]

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Quote:

Leon Means Microchip PIC chips

No kidding?!? :shock:

[Sorry. "Irrésistible", as the French say.]

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Quote:
Good night to everyone, are there any atmegas with built-in usb capabilities in dip packages?

Good night for you, afternoon for me and morning for some other. And this because of 2 reasons:
1st Because the earth is a sphere
2nd Because different members turn on their PC at different hours.

Ha ha, that was a jog.

In response to your question:
1. Yes, unfortunately there is no USB micro in DIP package from ATMEL.
2. An SMD package might no a restriction for you to solder it. Beceides, TQFP package coms very easy to solder it. Several help videos can be found at www.youtube.com. Just type "TQFP solder" in the search text box.
3. If you nead to connect it in a bread board, there are several solutions of TQFP to DIP adapters (PCBs) for example:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/32-64-44-P...
or you can design it yourself in your needs.

I hope this helps.

Michael.

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Last Edited: Thu. May 13, 2010 - 04:44 PM
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I designed a nice little PCB for the DIL PIC16F2455:

http://www.leonheller.com/usb/

Brad Minch's software is very easy to implement by following my instructions, or Microchip's free USB library can be used.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Quote:

In response to your question:
1. Yes, unfortunately there is no USB micro from ATMEL.

What on Earth are you talking about? Remind us again what the following are to be used for:

ATmega8U2
AT90USB82
ATmega16U2
AT90USB162
ATmega32U2
ATmega16U4
ATmega32U4
AT90USB646
AT90USB647
AT90USB1286
AT90USB1287

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Oooooooooops sorry. I wanted to write:

Quote:
Yes, unfortunately there is no USB micro in DIP package from ATMEL.

Thanks for the note.

Michael.

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I have already found one, the atmega644 20PU is a 40 pin dip package with usb capabilities, the idea is to use the usb connection to load one or to arrays to eeprom and then the chip will work stand alone, no problem if when using usb the chip cannot do anything else.
Or maybe I will just use some atmega328 and add one usb to serial cable as it is not necessary to have hign speed connection.
Thanks to the surprisingly fast responses ;)

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Nop. I don't think that the ATmega644 includes any USB host AND/OR device peripheral.
Here, you can download the latest datasheet from www.atmel.com:
http://www.atmel.com/dyn/product...

Michael.

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I think that he intends to use the software USB implementation.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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keepcool wrote:
... are there any atmegas with built-in usb capabilities in dip packages?
The answer is still no to your original question ... however, yes you can add a software USB in as small as the ATMega8. There are plenty of examples ...

There are no hardware implementations in a DIP package. However, you could also investigate the Teensy versions at www.pjrc.com .

Regards,

Ross

Ross McKenzie, Melbourne Australia

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AFAIK the only AVRs that have USB "built in" are currently the exact list I gave above. So mega644-20PU is not a USB device but, as I also said, V-USB can be used in all but the smallest AVRs and so the 644 is a candidate for using that software only solution.

By the way, get 644PA not 644 which is now "not recommended for new design" on the atmel.com site:

http://www.atmel.com/dyn/product...

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I have the impression requesting advices for a small project because you're planning to use DIP parts. In this case I would suggest you take a look at the FTDI chips.

The FT232R is a great USB to UART converter. It is VERY easy to use. It isn't available in DIP package. But you can use an adaptor board. Futurlec sells adaptors for a very reasonable price. You can connect the FTDI to any chip which has an UART. At ftdichip.com you can get royalty free drivers for almost any OS.

Here's an example where I have used the FT232R and an adaptor on a experimental board. The FT232R is located in the bottom-left corner:

Regards
Sebastian

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The FT232R is a good solution, but it is still an RS232 implementation (not a USB). You have to install the needed driver from FTDI to the PC connected to the product using the FT232R. In that way the PC see the connection as a Virtual COM port. There is also another driver from FTDI (d2x if I remember well) that can be used for high baud rates.

Michael.

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Quote:

The FT232R is a good solution, but it is still an RS232 implementation (not a USB).

Eh? the AVR facing side of the chip may well be UART but the PC facing side is unquestionably USB ?? The level 1, physical layer is USB.

(oh and Linux natively supports ftdi_sio.so - I thought at least Vista and Win7 did too if not XP?)

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I think icarus1 was making the usual mistake of think RS232 covers the serial format, whereas it really only specifies the signalling levels.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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If its just a learning project try this application note:

AVR309: Software Universal Serial Bus (USB)
http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resourc...
http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resourc...

They have an example using an ATtiny2313 which is available in a 20 pin PDIP.

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Quote:

AVR309: Software Universal Serial Bus (USB)

Just to note that V-USB claim many advantages over the Igor Cesko code:
Quote:
Advantages over other Firmware-Only Implementations
A similar driver for the AVR series of microcontrollers is available from Igor Češko. Our USB driver has the following advantages over Igor's driver:

• All customizable code written in ANSI-C and thus easier to maintain.
• Modular concept: easier to integrate into existing designs.
• Slightly smaller code size in spite of high level language modules.
• Faster: All encoding/decoding (USB requires NRZI coding and bit stuffing) is done in real-time, not in the main loop after storing away the raw data stream.
• More endpoints, USB descriptors can be better customized.
• V-USB comes with a free shared Vendor- / Product-ID pair.
• The level of standards conformance is documented (description of limitations and potential problems).
• Licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License or alternatively under a commercial license.

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I think the missing piece of the roll your own versus using the FTDI has to do with the Virtual Serial Port drivers on the PC. The FTDI has proprietary drivers that imitate an old 'RS232' style serial port so that you can use legacy terminal programs. If you build your own then you should be able use the standard Windows USB CDC drivers to do the same thing BUT for some reason I'm not seeing anyone doing this. I'm going to speculate that getting the AVR software USB to work with the CDC drivers must have some major catch or folks wouldn't be spending the extra $4 to add the FTDI to their designs.

If somebody is having good luck with the CDC and AVR software USB, I'd like to hear about it.

If you want to use the Atmel hardware USB solution be sure and check out LUFA at www.fourwalledcubicle.com

Smiley

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Quote:
Eh? the AVR facing side of the chip may well be UART but the PC facing side is unquestionably USB ?? The level 1, physical layer is USB.

Quote:
I think icarus1 was making the usual mistake of think RS232 covers the serial format, whereas it really only specifies the signalling levels.

Yes guys you are right, but in practice from the developer's point of view is still a UART comunication.

Don't you agree?

Michael.

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icarus1 wrote:
Quote:
Eh? the AVR facing side of the chip may well be UART but the PC facing side is unquestionably USB ?? The level 1, physical layer is USB.

Quote:
I think icarus1 was making the usual mistake of think RS232 covers the serial format, whereas it really only specifies the signalling levels.

Yes guys you are right, but in practice from the developer's point of view is still a UART comunication.

Don't you agree?


Yes, I do!

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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The problem is that my soldering skills are not so great, so anything smaller than dip and I think I will kill it, and I have a small impression that the postage from futurlec to Portugal may cost me a leg.
For what I need I will stick to an normal usart com and one rs232 to usb adapter.

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Then the MAX232(A) in DIP package is what you need.

Michael.

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Yes, that I know, but will try to get some of the ft232r and see if I can reflow then in a oven, thanks to all for the help provided! ;)

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Michael.

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