Are SDIO and LCD pins available on UC3-A3 Xplained

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I found out that AVR32 has virtual memory and concatenatable external RAM so I decided to search for a microcontroller. I found AT32UC3256 which has 84MHz and I like it!

I also found a board with SDRAM of 64MB which is going to be excellent for my computerish projects.

 

Now, I'm wondering if I'll be able to connect an LCD module that has an SD card slot to the pins remaining on the board.

Are those pins available?

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Download the schematics and have a look?

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The A3 Xplained board has a 64Mbit SDRAM and uses a AT32UC3A3256 processor.

Virtual memory ?, no.

Document AVR32918 "UC3-A3 Xplained hardware users' guide" from Atmel has tables that show what functions are available on the expansion headers.
Look at the I/O multiplexing in the processor datasheet to see what pins will need to be connected to your SD card.

Last Edited: Sun. May 3, 2015 - 07:23 AM
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SDRAM or SD as in micro-SD-cards? SDIO refers to the latter. SDRAM often uses FSMC/FMC for I/O.

 

 

Last Edited: Sun. May 3, 2015 - 05:30 AM
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When I said SDIO, I meant SD card input/output.

And how no virtual memory? http://www.atmel.com/Images/doc3... this clearly shows that MMU exists!

And who can be so nasty to say Mbit instead of MB(yte)? I've always read MB on my PC, but never had any memories measured in bits (except if that includes fx.(for example) 32-bit address space, but that's not a memory). What a tease! I was just expecting to have 64MB :( So it has 8MB, right?

So are the pins for the SD card on the board? Can any SPI interface be mapped for SDIO or is it a fixed specific one? I wouldn't like to buy the board if I won't be able to have the SDIO so I'd rather make my own schematics and send it to a local PCB maker.

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Memory chips are usually quoted in bits because there are many possible permutations of data and address widths.

 

There is confusion with the 32-bit AVRs because the AVR32 architecture has 2 variants, A and B.

The A variant is the UC3 family and it does not have an MMU. (look in the datasheet, the TLBEHI, TLBELO, MMUCR, etc registers mentioned in that AVR32113 document are not available in any AT32UCx processor.)

The B variant is the AP7 family and it has an MMU.

 

Document AVR32918 "UC3-A3 Xplained hardware users' guide" from Atmel has tables that show what pins are available on the expansion headers.
You will then need to look at the I/O multiplexing in the processor datasheet to see what functions are available on those pins.