Arduino dictionary ?

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#1
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Where can I get a dictionary of Arduino speech ?

E.g. what means shield, sketch and so on.
I fear, it's not related to fighting or laughing.

And why Arduino use a different speech, than other developers ?

Peter

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shield = plug in interface card

sketch = a C++ program. It would be exactly the same as any other C++ program apart from the fact that they "hide" main.cpp bolted onto what you write which has:

#include 

int main(void) {
  arduino_internal_init();
  setup();
  while(1) {
    loop();
  }
}

Your "sketch" then provides the setup() and loop() this refers to and does not need (usually) to worry about messy #include's.

I have no idea on earth why they felt the need to use these "new words". I know their target audience was the non computer literate but how "shield" is better than "interface card" and how "sketch" is better than "program" I don't really know. iT just seems like unnecessary dumbing-down.

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Arduino is built on top of Processing which is an IDE that lets artists use java. You remember all those rotating cubes and annoying stuff like birds that follow your cursor around a browser - processing lets artist use those things. Since it was designed for artists they use 'sketches' for programs. You may also notice that in the IDE the shortcut buttons look like audio player buttons since they figured the artist would already be familiar with them. The Arduino folks picked up Processing and modified it to work with hardware and the Arduino was born.

As far as 'dumbed-down' you need only work with Arduino folks for a while to understand that it can't be dumbed-down enough. These folks aren't stupid, but they may well be completely clueless about all things electrical and computer, yet they want to do things like build mockups of cutting edge coffee percolators that have flashing lights and beep when the coffee done.

The original intended audience was absolutely not engineers or even informed hobbyists. However, I find it to be an excellent productivity tool for making quick and dirty tests of all sorts of code algorithms or hardware prototypes. I can gen-up a prototype far quicker with the Arduino than anything I used before and if everything works, then it is no problem to port the concepts to more engineer friendly systems.

Smiley

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I'd like to second the recommendation for excellent rapid prototyping platform. And I dont even use their IDE. Yet.

Imagecraft compiler user

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And I don't use the IDE "still" -- except to do the final compile/program/run. It's somewhat unfortunate that the editor is so poor, the IDE wouldn't be that bad otherwise. But, it does interface quite well with the Arduino and it is also easy to do much of the editing outside the IDE, so, really, no complaints there.

The libraries and consistent board designs, however, are priceless for rapid ( and repeatable ) prototyping.

As for a dictionary... I don't know of one either, but I've found that most things start to make sense pretty quickly from context. And, as with all things, it makes sense to read plenty about Arduinos before and while using them.

Martin Jay McKee

As with most things in engineering, the answer is an unabashed, "It depends."