applied 5 volts to spark fun nrf24+

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I ordered 2 sparkfun boards and could not figure out why one didnt work until I saw it was wired to 5 volts. (damn).. I have ordered my replacemens but was wondering if anyone could take a guess as to  what fried. Best I can determine, its the chip itself, but figure I'd pop the question and see if anyone had a thought.

 

 

 

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As the schematic shows (typographical errors notwithstanding), that board has a 3.3V regulator, and therefore can take 5V without any trouble.  All of the nRF's inputs are 5V tolerant as well.  Both of these facts are clearly stated on the product page:

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/705

 

So, something else must be wrong with the non-working board.

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As  joeymorin says, the board is designed to be powered from 5V - so where, exactly, did you "wire" your 5V ... ?

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could not figure out why one didnt work until I saw it was wired to 5 volts. (

You must have been driving it from a 5V AVR port? 

 

Let them know you got the sparks, but not the fun. frown

 

Always throw in a series resistor (maybe 1K ) for external signals (unless you need really fast clocking freqs)...saves a lot of initial setup mishaps. 

 

 I have ordered my replacemens

They are ordering the ABS filament...just let them know your fill ratio & shoe size.  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Thu. Jul 16, 2020 - 06:38 PM
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I downloaded the current Eagle files for this board (it has corrected annotations) and traced the nets. The external power connection is definitely 5V. And as others have said, the device is 5V tolerant on its i/o pins.

 

There is no connection that would cause damage if you provided 5V instead of 3V3.