AP7000, Java and memories experience?

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Dear fellow freaks!
To start with the demand: run Java (something similar to J2ME)

Been looking at the AP7000, seems like a good candidate. Anyone tried using a JVM on the AP7000?

If the AP7000 is a good choose then I’ve got the next issue: Almost everyone using ARM9 etc are complaining about flash/sram memories that have a short product life. The design often needs to be updated with new memories. Is this a real issue? What memories would you recommend?

If the memories really are a pain, that perhaps an AP7000+memory module would be a better solution. Anyone got a recommendation?

Any feedbacks based on your experience on any of these points are highly valued!

Kind regards
Björn

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JamVM has been ported to AVR32 including GNU classpath libraries.

By SRAM do you mean SDRAM? You really should be running SDRAM as main memory; it's more dense and faster. It's also the same stuff you find in your PC and has the same reliability issues (i.e. practically none).

Regarding flash, yes you can get flash cell wear. There are strategies to reduce writes to flash and increasing lifetime and in a well-thought-out product flash lifetime shouldn't be an issue.

When you say "Memory Module" what do you mean? If you mean something like an SD card or something then they all have exactly the same flash wear issues (as do things like USB memory sticks etc). The difference is that an SD card or USB stick has internal hardware to make sure the whole of memory wears out at the same time. Using flash under Linux you get this kind of wear leveling done in software anyway so nothing gained.

-S.

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Dear Squidgit,

Thanks for your reply. Yes, I do mean SDRAM. But I was unclear regarding the memory life-time.

What I mean is that the memories are not produced for a very long time; the product lifecycle is very short. So that’s why I was looking at modules combining AVR32 + memories, since then it’s enough to change module and not the entire design each time a memory product reaches end-of-life.

Have you created any AVR32 designs? If yes, how many layers were needed?

Kind regards
Björn

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Ah right.

Intel are very good at providing long-term production guarantees. If this is important to you, check them out. Also, the gray market (eg hkinventory) is fantastic for long-discontinued parts. We have no problems finding a number of CPUs for products we've been producing for near 15 years. Also; even if a part number changes the new one is generally a drop-in replacement anyway.

I donno what you might find regarding CPU modules like you're talking about. I would suspect that most of these modules you'll find won't have a product cycle much longer than the parts they're made of.

I have done a few AVR32 designs. Most have been 8 layers because they needed to be quite physically small. I have done one in 6 layers which wasn't hard, but did require the board to be larger than for an 8-layer design.

-S.