Anybody check out the AT91SAM7S64-IAR evaluation kit?

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#1
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So it looks like the AT91SAM7S series of chips are actually going to be available from places like DigiKey soon. I just ordered the last AT91SAM7S64-IAR evaluation kit from DigiKey which should be here in a couple days. Has anybody played with this yet? It comes with the J-LINK JTAG USB adapter and a 32-kB code-size-limited version of the IAR ARM compiler (full functionality)!

Here are the details on the IAR site: http://www.iar.com/Products/?nam...

These chips look VERY promising, and DigiKey is listing the 32K flash / 8K SRAM version (AT91SAM7S32) at only $6.24! The specs on these are awesome...

32-bit uC
55 MHz
32-256K flash
8-64K SRAM
entire chip runs off of 3.3V supply (5V tolerant IO)
internal oscillator w/ PLL
SPI, TWI, dual enhanced USARTS with USB 2.0, PWM, timers, etc

Not bad!

Here's an image of the eval board:

Last Edited: Tue. Nov 29, 2016 - 07:38 PM
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Wow, been waiting for these to come around for a while. Killer price, makes me wonder if it won't really start killing off the AVR's on that basis alone. Low pin count, high-speed, low cost, very interesting.

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fredkoehler wrote:
Wow, been waiting for these to come around for a while. Killer price, makes me wonder if it won't really start killing off the AVR's on that basis alone. Low pin count, high-speed, low cost, very interesting.

The real bonus if the free fully-functional 32kB kickstart version of the IAR ARM compiler. If you stick with the 32kB AT91SAM7S32, then you've got it made!

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After excellent 8 bit AVR from ATMEL we see EXCELLENT 32bit ARM7 SAM7 micros from ATMEL.Great JOB is done by atmel designers!

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Great devices (Atmel and Philips) 4 times as fast as AVR
I think we need more choice in compilers and support sites
I think IAR is to $$$$$$$ :? ImageCraft has a beta ARM compiler. I downloaded it and it looks good. :D Still a little bit rough but that’s why it is beta.
We also need an ArmFreaks site. I just found that www.armfreaks.net and .com are already registered.

John

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The AT91SAM7S256 256kb Flash and 64kb Ram is only $12.11 25up
Thats cheaper then a ATMega-128 with a memory chip. But also double the flash and 4 times as fast. :lol:

John

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JohnGroenland wrote:
Great devices (Atmel and Philips) 4 times as fast as AVR
I think we need more choice in compilers and support sites
I think IAR is to $$$$$$$ :? ImageCraft has a beta ARM compiler. I downloaded it and it looks good. :D Still a little bit rough but that’s why it is beta.
We also need an ArmFreaks site. I just found that www.armfreaks.net and .com are already registered.

John

But if you stay under 32kB, the IAR is FREE! :D

Sure, the clock-speed is about 4x, but don't forget that you have an even wider instruction set, and you can chunk 32 bits instead of 8. However bit-banging takes more than one clock cycle I believe. (I'm still an ARM newbie... I used the LPC2106 for one project with IAR and was pretty hooked...)

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JohnGroenland wrote:
The AT91SAM7S256 256kb Flash and 64kb Ram is only $12.11 25up
Thats cheaper then a ATMega-128 with a memory chip. But also double the flash and 4 times as fast. :lol:

John

How about at91freaks.net? or sam7freaks.net? ;)

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jimbotko wrote:

How about at91freaks.net? or sam7freaks.net? ;)

You got it all wrong. It's this:
http://www.at91.com/

Which actually resolves. :wink:

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Quote:
Sure, the clock-speed is about 4x, but don't forget that you have an even wider instruction set, and you can chunk 32 bits instead of 8. However bit-banging takes more than one clock cycle I believe. (I'm still an ARM newbie... I used the LPC2106 for one project with IAR and was pretty hooked...)

I think that the ARM in Thumb mode is almost efficient as the AVR. It's also a 16bit code environment.

John

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Wow, at US$295 that is some expensive piece of kit you've got there.

Everything looks great for the ARM7 atmel cores except that there is no cheap development / evaluation boards available.

Anyone know if Atmel have plans to drop the price on the evaluation kits as well as the AT91SAM7S* ?

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@Dingo_aus
295$ is cheap I got only JTAG ice for 299$ without compiler / ev board!

Michael

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Dingo_aus wrote:
Wow, at US$295 that is some expensive piece of kit you've got there.

That was my first thought as well. Then I factored-in a full (I hope/presume) 32k IAR compiler, and it comes out to about the same price as an STK500 + Olimex JTAG + ImageCraft/CodeVision compiler for an AVR setup.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Freaks, there's cheap out there: http://anyway.no-ip.org:8080/
see: ARM7 2104 Embedded Controller Development Board, w/philips chip
has the LEDs and buttons.. sit down $100

Regards,
Scott

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Forgive my ignorant interjection, but would someone be able to explain the definitive difference between an ARM architecture and that of the typical uC? Also, what are the connotations of the term "System-on-Chip"?

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scottm wrote:
Freaks, there's cheap out there: http://anyway.no-ip.org:8080/
see: ARM7 2104 Embedded Controller Development Board, w/philips chip
has the LEDs and buttons.. sit down $100

Then you're stuck with Philips. :P

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theusch wrote:
Dingo_aus wrote:
Wow, at US$295 that is some expensive piece of kit you've got there.

That was my first thought as well. Then I factored-in a full (I hope/presume) 32k IAR compiler, and it comes out to about the same price as an STK500 + Olimex JTAG + ImageCraft/CodeVision compiler for an AVR setup.

Lee

True, I wasn't saying it wasn't good value, just that it is only one end of the market (the expensive end). I really mean very few hobbyists are going to access Atmel ARM cores if the initial cost is US$300.

I'd just like something like a "Olimex dongle" + AVR_GCC compiler :)

I do have word that some of our cheaper manufacturer friends have plans to try and get a cheap at91 board into the market place 2nd quarter 2005.

EDIT: One gets the feeling it will take a while for the cheap Atmel ARM7s to filter though. But once they do, I think we'll see as much support for them as the AVR enjoys. I'm guessing about a year for this to happen (but what do I know?)

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Dingo_aus wrote:

I'd just like something like a "Olimex dongle" + AVR_GCC compiler :)

I know that GCC has ARM as a target, though I can't currently recommend a good "distribution"; I just don't know enough about that particular target or about all the various GCC distros for that target. But they're out there...

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I think the software will improve as soon as a good, cheap method of programming them becomes available.

Olimex have one dongle at the moment for the Philips core but it still suffers from lots of serious problems like not being able to program the flash in certain circumstances etc.

Hopefully atmel will provide the same sort of support for the new at91 cores as they have for AVR and we will see lots of programmers hit the scene in the next year due to Atmel showing everyone the way through documentation etc.

I don't mind sticking with AVRs at the moment, but the prospect of software MP3 players, GBA clones, and embedded Linux are great things to look forward to.

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From "SAM7S-Forum" at www.at91.com: A future Chip-Revision will have a UART Flash-Uploader ("Bootloader"). If this is implemented like the one on the Philips LPC2000s there is just a serial-connection (i.e. with a MAX3232) needed to upload flash-code to the ARM-device.
Do to not yet own a SAM7S-dev-board (anyone willing to sponsor ;-) ) but the gnu-Toolset ("ready-made" from gnuarm.com or codesourcery or maybe my WinARM collection) supports the architecture. Startup-code and linker-scripts needed to "adapt" the gnu toolset to the Atmel target are available on the AT91-CD (download available at at91.com).

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jimbotko wrote:
scottm wrote:
Freaks, there's cheap out there: http://anyway.no-ip.org:8080/
see: ARM7 2104 Embedded Controller Development Board, w/philips chip
has the LEDs and buttons.. sit down $100

Then you're stuck with Philips. :P

You get a lot more "fun" with this board
Its supposed to run uC-linux , if you want

http://anyway.no-ip.org:8080/ep/...

Even though its $160

Btw: on Olimex under news , it seems like they're comming with some SAMS and other Arm boards

/Bingo

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theusch wrote:
Dingo_aus wrote:
Wow, at US$295 that is some expensive piece of kit you've got there.

That was my first thought as well. Then I factored-in a full (I hope/presume) 32k IAR compiler, and it comes out to about the same price as an STK500 + Olimex JTAG + ImageCraft/CodeVision compiler for an AVR setup.

Lee

Actually, the fully functional 32kB IAR kickstart for the ARM is available for free from the IAR website for free for anybody. When you install the software, it gives you a link to the IAR website where you register with an email address and they email you the registration information that enables the software. The download is on the dev kit information page in my original post.

Here's a link for anybody interested: http://www.iar.com/FilesPublic/K...

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I guess I need to retract my support for the $295, then. If the software that is bundled is available elsewhere for no-charge, then what is one getting? A $100 dev board for a $5 microcontroller, and a $200 JTAGICE?

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:
I guess I need to retract my support for the $295, then. If the software that is bundled is available elsewhere for no-charge, then what is one getting? A $100 dev board for a $5 microcontroller, and a $200 JTAGICE?

Lee

Agreed. I'm using it for evaluation at work. If I had to purchase it personally I may have gone another route.

At $6 I might as well stick these chips in every project, even if it's just an LED flasher. :D

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Ubergeek - Firstly the ARM is a 32bit architecture - it is also a more 'general purpose' processor rather than a narrow focussed controller like 8051,PIC,AVR etc. The controllers sacrifice the 'general purposeness' by having limited ram and rom but make up for it in having specific enhancments for control apps - bit control etc.So in some instances the AVR may be better suited to a task rather than an ARM. The beauty of these new parts (Atmel SAM and Philips LPC21xx) is that they have a reasonably fast 32bit cpu with peripherals we normally expect with a '51 or AVR - timers, uarts,twi etc. The major plus about the ARM architecture is that it is fairly widespead and tools are thick on the ground. The GCC compiler is robust if a little cryptic, I've used the demo Keil frontend with the gcc compiler backend and it worked fine. Being a 'general purpose' cpu, when you write 'c' you don't need to be concerned about the specifics of the architecture like with a '51 - although you need to be concerned about code size and ram!

Whilst on the surface the ARM stuff looks like it is much faster in terms of MIPS, but that doesn't tell the whole story. Obviously, the ARM is going to do a 32bit crc much faster than an AVR, but specific bit bashing and control stuff may find the AVR winning out. Horses for courses, they say.

Whilst the ARM stuff crosses over into the AVR world, it doesn't replace it.

Looks like the ARM is the '51 of the 32bit world.

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The only problem I can see is that so far they only come in LQFP packages which have lead spacing of .65mm at the maximum.

I can see places like Olimex and ERE doing a good trade in AT91SAM7S pre-soldered onto DIP breakout boards.

Jimbotko: If you are making 10 000 LED flashers that will be under $3 a chip! What better use of an ARM core?

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Thanks, Kartman.

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Dingo - what's the problem soldering 0.65mm lead space devices? Just get some flux gel, apply and run a ball of solder across the pins. With a little practice it can be done quickly - it is no harder than soldering a atmega128 although a magnifying glass does help!

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But what to solder it on to? You have to have a nice fancy breakout board or similar.

Is it feasible to make PCBs yourself with traces small enough to take these?

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Tiny11's cost less than 50 cents in bulk. A much better LED blinker =)

-Curiosity may have killed the cat
-But that's why they have nine lives

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dingo - a friend of mine made his own pcb for a MSC1210 and I think they have 0.5mm spacing. It did ,in fact ,work. For me thought, I'd just get some pcbs made or buy - Olimex has some good stuff for the LPC21xx.

DIP packages and 5v is going out very quickly. So, we'll be seing more of these high density packages as they're cheaper to produce as is the lower voltage silicon. Try getting a 5V FPGA or CPLD - most are 3v and lower - the 5v stuff is more expensive.

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I understand why DIP is going the way of the dodo. I didn't realise 5v is passe too. I can see why with smaller and smaller fabs these days.

I think things like this (http://www.olimex.com/dev/avr-m32.html) will gain in popularity but I'd be very happy if I could make my own. I guess I'll just order some from Olimex when I need to, then learn the best way of soldering them.

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Dingo_aus wrote:
I understand why DIP is going the way of the dodo. I didn't realise 5v is passe too. I can see why with smaller and smaller fabs these days.

I think things like this (http://www.olimex.com/dev/avr-m32.html) will gain in popularity but I'd be very happy if I could make my own. I guess I'll just order some from Olimex when I need to, then learn the best way of soldering them.

I see the example , but exactly that board it justs makes a smd-m32 into a normal m32 (rather expensive for that) , i use normal DIP M32's in the AVR-P40B-8535-8Mhz boards from them.

They sell this one (just the PCB for $2.95) thats interesting
http://www.olimex.com/dev/avr-h1...

/Bingo

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Dingo_aus wrote:
But what to solder it on to? You have to have a nice fancy breakout board or similar.

Is it feasible to make PCBs yourself with traces small enough to take these?

I just last week made a board with traces 0.254mm wide, to mount a tqfp-100, with a pin spacing of 0.5mm so yes should be possible to mount the ARM chip. I'm just using standard photosensitised board, a decent 1200dpi printer and a UV exposure box. Though to be honest I am just about at the limit of my equipment.

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Kartman wrote:

DIP packages and 5v is going out very quickly. So, we'll be seing more of these high density packages as they're cheaper to produce as is the lower voltage silicon. Try getting a 5V FPGA or CPLD - most are 3v and lower - the 5v stuff is more expensive.

IIRC Xilinx still make both CPLD and FPGA in 5v, and also their XC95xxXL series CPLDs are 5v IO tollerent so can still be used in 5V circuits. So all you need is a little 3.3v regulator to power the CPLD from. Some of these are also available in PLCC, which should be no harder to do than DIP, as it's standard 0.1" pin spacing.

I also believe that Atmel do CPLD in DIP as well, not sure if they are 5V tho.

Phill.

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@prime

Wooww thats neat , i am hopefully going to finish my UV Box next weekend.

Do you use a laser or an inkjet ???

What model , what ink type , what paper/transparent do you print on ??

/Bingo

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Bingo600 wrote:
@prime

Wooww thats neat , i am hopefully going to finish my UV Box next weekend.

Do you use a laser or an inkjet ???

What model , what ink type , what paper/transparent do you print on ??

/Bingo

HP LaserJet 1200, though I did have to go into the library in eagle, and reduce the width of the smd pads from .35mm to .25mm, as without this they where merging together, like I said this is about the limit :)

Just using normal tracing paper, I believe it's the 90g/m stuff, seems to work pretty well. Exposure time you will have to find by experement, for me about 2 minutes seems about right.

Using the clean developer that does not contain Sodium Hydroxide, and Sodium persulphate etching solution, which is *MUCH* cleaner than Feric Chloride ! Also using a propper heated etching tank so that I can etch in about 10 minutes, rather than the 45 it was taking me doing it by hand :)

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prime wrote:
Bingo600 wrote:
@prime

Wooww thats neat , i am hopefully going to finish my UV Box next weekend.

Do you use a laser or an inkjet ???

What model , what ink type , what paper/transparent do you print on ??

/Bingo

HP LaserJet 1200, though I did have to go into the library in eagle, and reduce the width of the smd pads from .35mm to .25mm, as without this they where merging together, like I said this is about the limit :)

Just using normal tracing paper, I believe it's the 90g/m stuff, seems to work pretty well. Exposure time you will have to find by experement, for me about 2 minutes seems about right.

Using the clean developer that does not contain Sodium Hydroxide, and Sodium persulphate etching solution, which is *MUCH* cleaner than Feric Chloride ! Also using a propper heated etching tank so that I can etch in about 10 minutes, rather than the 45 it was taking me doing it by hand :)

Tracing paper ???

Are you making a film from print on white paper or is the Tracing paper transparent ???

Btw: I have seen a Minolta 1200 dpi but i think its 1200x600 , is the HP
1200x 1200

/Bingo

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Bingo600 wrote:
prime wrote:
Bingo600 wrote:
@prime

Wooww thats neat , i am hopefully going to finish my UV Box next weekend.

Do you use a laser or an inkjet ???

What model , what ink type , what paper/transparent do you print on ??

/Bingo

HP LaserJet 1200, though I did have to go into the library in eagle, and reduce the width of the smd pads from .35mm to .25mm, as without this they where merging together, like I said this is about the limit :)

Just using normal tracing paper, I believe it's the 90g/m stuff, seems to work pretty well. Exposure time you will have to find by experement, for me about 2 minutes seems about right.
:)

Tracing paper ???

Yep, just normal thick tracing paper.

Quote:

Are you making a film from print on white paper or is the Tracing paper transparent ???

Reasonably transparent to Ultraviolet, but only translucent to visible light. Forgot where I heard to try it, was on a website about making PCBs, believe me it does work and is much cheaper than the proper white draghtman's paper that is traditionaly used. And yes printing direct to tracing paper. What IS important is that you use a heavy grade of paper like I said 90g/m or better.

Quote:

Btw: I have seen a Minolta 1200 dpi but i think its 1200x600 , is the HP
1200x 1200

/Bingo

The HP is supposedly 1200x1200, though seems to have slightly better horizontal, than vertical resolution which is why I had to reduce the pad widths by 0.1mm.

Phill.

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Very interesting. Making ones own PCBs for this size sounds like some good fun :)

On the side:
I've had word that www.futurlec.com will stocking the Atmel AT91SAM7 line as soon as the can.

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I use AT91SAM7S64.and I want open WDT.there is code "*AT91C_WDTC_WDCR =(1<<0)|(165<<24);*AT91C_WDTC_WDMR =(4096<<0)|(1<<12)|(1<<13)|(0<<14)|(0<<15)     |(4090<<16)|(1<<28)|(0<<29);",I find fail to write to register,because when I read from this two register,the result is wrong, is there I have to enable SLCK?,or IS there any protect to register in order to write? If I have to close this protection? anyone who can tell me,my code under,

 

 

void LedInit(void)
{
 *AT91C_PIOA_PER=0x07;  
 *AT91C_PIOA_OER=0x07;  
 *AT91C_PIOA_SODR=0x07; 
}

 

void WDTInit(void)
{
    /**AT91C_WDTC_WDCR =(1<<0)
                                        |(165<<24);*/
    *AT91C_WDTC_WDCR = 0xA5000001|(*AT91C_WDTC_WDCR);
    /**AT91C_WDTC_WDMR =(4096<<0)
                                        |(1<<12)
                                        |(1<<13)
                                        |(0<<14)
                                        |(0<<15)
                                        |(4090<<16)
                                        |(1<<28)
                                        |(0<<29);*/
    *AT91C_WDTC_WDMR = 0x1FFA3FFF|(*AT91C_WDTC_WDMR);
    ceshishuju = 0x00000000;
    ceshishuju = *AT91C_WDTC_WDMR;
    ceshi1 = ceshishuju|ceshi1;
    ceshi2 = (ceshishuju>>8)|ceshi2;
    ceshi3 = (ceshishuju>>16)|ceshi3;
    ceshi4 = (ceshishuju>>24)|ceshi4;
    UartPutChar(0xEB);
    UartPutChar(ceshi1);
    UartPutChar(ceshi2);
    UartPutChar(ceshi3);
    UartPutChar(ceshi4);
    UartPutChar(0xA5);
    //*AT91C_WDTC_WDMR;
}

 

void main(void)
{

     SystemClockInit();

     LedInit();

     WDTInit();

    while(1)
     {  

         OnLed2();
         OnLed3();
         OnLed4();

         DelayXms(1000);

         OffLed2();
         OffLed3();
         OffLed4();

         DelayXms(1000);

      }

}

yyfengh

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yyfengh wrote:
I use AT91SAM7S64.and ...

 

1)  You have put your unrelated post into a thread that is over 10 years old.

2)  This forum is for AVR8 models.  This site is for AVR models.  Others may suggest a more usable site.

 

Click on Communities above, and what do you find?

Atmel SMART ARM-based MCUs:  The Atmel ARM-Based MCU community area provides forums for discussing all topics related to Atmel's ARM-based MCUs and MPUs.

 

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

Last Edited: Tue. Nov 29, 2016 - 03:44 PM
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and moving

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly