Learning C

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I have got a frind to learn me Winavr and C for ardoino. and I plan to try out some C for PC paralell to it.

Witch C and GUI to install, to make it most posibil alike tke Studio 4 envirment?

I should like to use studio as devlopment tool, if posibile.

HM

HM

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Atmel Studio 6 for the AVR stuff.
Pelles C for the PC side mainly to learn C syntax and to quickly test algorithms.
Continue to use the Arduino as the development board, but program it with Atmel Studio.

Smiley

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Why should I go for Studio 6 and not studio 4?
What are the "google name" of the C devlopment tool?

I use arduino as a suplement to the orher smaler controller, and I use STK500 and Dragon.

HM

HM

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Use Studio 6 because Studio 4 is NOT being updated. That means that newer chips will NOT be supported by Studio 4.

Studio 6 is not totally bug free (is there any software that is?). But, it gets steadily better. Version 6.1 is pretty good. Downside? The download is really big.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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On theother side. It is wiser using Studio 4 to learn somthing new, as for me, learning C.

If I in the future should neet to move to Studio 6, den I, proberly, know C.

The other questione, wich "C-devlop tool for PC may I chose? I prefere one, most like Studio 4.

HM

HM

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Quote:

It is wiser using Studio 4 to learn somthing new, as for me, learning C.

So not true. AS6 has this wonderful feature called VassistX (and add-on that costs $249 if you buy it separately). There is also a free add-on available called "Naggy". Both enhance the C learning experience as they either show you or provide immediate access to the thing you just typed. So if you call the function sin() (say) and have forgotten what it takes and returns VassistX provides "Goto implementation" to let you quickly check. And if you did something like:

y = sin("what goes here");

Naggy will underline the "what goes here" to tell you that it is not what is expected at that point. You don't get help like this in the very simplistic AS4. That alone is worth the entrance price!

Quote:

The other questione, wich "C-devlop tool for PC may I chose? I prefere one, most like Studio 4.

I'd say that both Pelles C or Code::Blocks (including the gcc compiler) would give you a similar experience to AS4 when it comes to writing PC software. There is also Mcircosoft Visual Studio Express. In fact AS6 is based on MSVS2010 so if you use AS6 for AVR you will find a lot in VS2010 that is similar but the underlying C compiler is more different than the other options.

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Um.So why would you expect it to be "better" to learn C with studio 4?

I use C, but I can't claim to know it.

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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clawson wrote:
Quote:

It is wiser using Studio 4 to learn somthing new, as for me, learning C.

So not true. AS6 has this wonderful feature called VassistX (and add-on that costs $249 if you buy it separately). There is also a free add-on available called "Naggy". Both enhance the C learning experience as they either show you or provide immediate access to the thing you just typed. So if you call the function sin() (say) and have forgotten what it takes and returns VassistX provides "Goto implementation" to let you quickly check. And if you did something like:

y = sin("what goes here");

Naggy will underline the "what goes here" to tell you that it is not what is expected at that point. You don't get help like this in the very simplistic AS4. That alone is worth the entrance price!

Quote:

The other questione, wich "C-devlop tool for PC may I chose? I prefere one, most like Studio 4.

I'd say that both Pelles C or Code::Blocks (including the gcc compiler) would give you a similar experience to AS4 when it comes to writing PC software. There is also Mcircosoft Visual Studio Express. In fact AS6 is based on MSVS2010 so if you use AS6 for AVR you will find a lot in VS2010 that is similar but the underlying C compiler is more different than the other options.

May I inform you, you are answering questiones that are not asked. and my asked question are nor mentioned.

HM

HM

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Studio 6 seems to be more comfortable than Studio 4 :
semantic checking -arguments being of the right type- Clawson showed can avoid losing a lot of time (-I make a lot of bugs-); this time can be used ... to teach oneself C (instead of recompiling/trying to to fix/add other errors) .

If your objective is to learn C quickly and comfortably -an objective is deeper, more relevant than a list of questions- , it is wise to learn Studio6.

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If you are convinced that Studio4 is going to be the best started IDE for AVR, then I think you will find that finding a matching IDE for PC side is going to be difficult. Every IDE is different anyway, and before Atmel Studio 5, their IDE was 100% in-house design. In any case, C on a PC is just like C on the AVR, so the language isn't going to change in any major ways. the places they will differ are areas where C doesn't have anything to say in the standard, like interrupts ( which you are unlikely to need to program on the PC anyhow ).

Being a Linux guy, I can't comment on many Windows IDEs but I've used both Microsoft Studio ( Express and the old 6.0 ) which is nice once you get past its bloat, and I've played with Code::Blocks which seems like it could be nice as well.

Martin Jay McKee

As with most things in engineering, the answer is an unabashed, "It depends."

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Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
The other questione, wich "C-devlop tool for PC may I chose? I prefere one, most like Studio 4.

I'd say that both Pelles C or Code::Blocks (including the gcc compiler) would give you a similar experience to AS4 when it comes to writing PC software. There is also Mcircosoft Visual Studio Express. In fact AS6 is based on MSVS2010 so if you use AS6 for AVR you will find a lot in VS2010 that is similar but the underlying C compiler is more different than the other options.

and my asked question are nor mentioned.

I think you may need to see an optician.