What's this called and where do I get one?

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Hi guys,

While dissasebmling a piece of equipment I came across an interesting part, something that I'd like to use in my own constructions.

But I can't name it properly in english. Attached is a crude drawing of it - it's obviously meant to mount a PCB onto something. It's a simple part, but it would replace all of those nasty L sections I used so far.

So, can anyone name this properly and if possible point me to a shop where they have these buggers?

Thanks,

David

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Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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Keystone Electronics...

http://www.keyelco.com/products/...

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

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#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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The keystone parts (and that drawing of yours) is for attaching screw terminals. Relatively high current.

I suppose you could also use them for attaching a PCB to a panel. And that's a very interesting use for them. Keystone parts are usually reasonably priced and available.

fwiw, these are also available for mechanical assembly.
(not sure of cost/availability)

http://www.pemnet.com/fastening_products/pdf/smtradata.pdf

-carl

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Thanks for the info guys, much appreciated.

I don't know about those SMD parts - seems fishy to me, relying on copper as the main attatchement. The truhole ones seem less fishy to me.

There are pointy haired bald people.
Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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There are also brackets like that with larger holes, commonly used for RCA jacks and coaxial power connectors and even BNC connectors. Bracket is one possible name for the thing.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net