How to solder pcb's with automatic machines

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Hi i want to know that how can i solder my pcb's with automatic machines. I have seen many online kits manufacturers use very difficult and small soldering with smd's. Does anyone know how this is done? Can anyone refer any links to buy such things?
Thank you

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My automatic machine is a soldering iron with a VERY fine point, a pair of tweezers, and a magnifier. For me, this works for most larger SMT things (down to 0603) and SOT23 and SO-8 ICs.

Typically, I tin ONE pad and leave the others untinned. Then, I solder the part to that one pad, adjusting its orientation as needed, The lack of tinning on other pads allows it to sit flat on the board. Once in proper alignment, I solder a pad near the opposite corner. Finally, the remaining ones.

There are other techniques involving toaster ovens and such. Others will elaborate, I am sure.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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You're talking about several machines actually. First you apply solder paste, usually a manual process, then a Pick N Place machine would be used to place all the SMD parts on the PWB. Then the loaded PWB goes through a solder station, usually an IR oven. If through hole parts are involved then a reflow or solder wave would also be used. These are not cheap machines so unless you plan to go into some major production with volumes in the thousands, I would let a fab house do the assembly for you.

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For production, I agree with dksmall. For one-off, it is faster by hand.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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If i'm going for production, which machine you will suggest me and how much may be the price?

Actually i haven't done smd soldering yet, if you could, explain me about it.

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If you haven't done any SMD soldering before and you are going into production I would suggest that you get the first few runs done for you by a PCB production house.

Quote:
could you explain me about it.

You could Google that yourself, but here is a reference already available on AVRFreaks

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A number of companies that do inexpensive PCBs now do stencils as well, and it doesn't take a large number of boards to make the time savings of a stencil well worth the upfront cost. It also becomes a lot easier to deal with fine pitch and leadless packages, which can otherwise be tedious to do by hand.

But before you even start worrying about doing anything in any volume, you should assemble a few boards by hand--the experience will be invaluable when (not if!) you find yourself needing to do some rework later on.

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Watch these three videos if you want to know how to solder stuff by hand. The SMT stuff looks like magic, and you can do it yourself if you want to.

Sid

Life... is a state of mind

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You're talking tens if not hundreds of £thousands for SMT machines. We just spent £750K on one....mind you, it's a good one :)
Even a cheap system is going to run £75K

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I use an electric frypan. Of course, I only put smd devices on 1 side of the board.

1. Use a toothpick to smear the solder paste onto the pads. Surprising how little you need here. You don't have to be particularly neat as the solder will automagically clear itself from between the pins.

2. Stick your parts to the solder paste. It's a little bit sticky, unless you don't have air conditioning in the summer time. No sneezing allowed.

3. Place the board on the cold frypan and turn the frypan on high.

4. Watch closely. After a couple minutes, the dull gray paste will turn bright silver and slurp itself to the pins. Look around for any parts that have stood on end like a tombstone. Just poke them back down with a toothpick.

5. Look around the board to see that all have soldered. It only takes a moment to do steps 4 and 5.

6. Turn off the frypan and let it cool till you can pick up your finished board.

7. Look around for solder bridges. These happen if you had too much paste. A small soldering iron and bit of "solder braid" will clean any of these up in a moment.

There's a bit of a knack to it, but your first attempt will come out nicely. Sometimes my bare copper will discolor and turn red, but this polishes easily with a green scrubbie.

To use automated equipment:

A. Spend much money buying and installing automatic equipment.

B. Follow the directions.

The place I'm having my "odometer" boards made will assemble them for me for like 3USD per board plus parts. For that, they'll even get the parts from Digikey or Mouser. Pretty reasonable, I'd say.

A guy to ask might be Gabriel. His little gadgets are much more complex than mine and he sells them at reasonable prices.

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Quote:
You're talking tens if not hundreds of £thousands for SMT machines. We just spent £750K on one....mind you, it's a good one Smile
Even a cheap system is going to run £75K

If one is feeling adventuresome, there is a lot of good used equipment out there. It seems electronic manufacturers constantly spring up like weeds and last about as long 8-) I run two machines that are just now celebrating their 20th birthday. Be prepared to spend at least $20k, but you may find even better deals. Look for equipment that still has some sort of factory support available, and with P&Ps a major part of the cost/value is in the component 'feeders'. You'll want lots of them!

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma