Will a 5.8 GHz wireless SCART transmitter interfere 802.11n?

Go To Last Post
17 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi Freaks,

I plan to buy a König VID-TRANS515KN 5.8 Ghz wireless SCART transmitter. I also plan to upgrade my wifi router to a wireless N device. I'm afraid that the two will interfere badly. According to what I read 5 GHz wifi actually uses the 5.1 to 5.8 GHz frequency range which seems to justify my concern.

What's your take on this?

Thanks,
Laci

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

There are only a few ISM (Industrial, Scientific, & Medical) bands are available world wide. 2.4GHz is one and 5.4-5.8GHz is another. That is where they put BlueTooth, 802.15.x, WiFi, and many other things. For the most part, these are frequency hopping and if a receiver is not very close to a transmitter, not much happens. There WAS a huge concern about BT and WiFi in the same computer, but, practically, it seems to have little effect.

Thus, the simple fact that two pieces of hardware share the same frequency band does not automatically mean problems. On the other hand, there are no guarantees. Your only solution is to experiment.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I don't think the two frequencies are harmonically related, so you should be fine.

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

In my humble opinion, I'm always right. 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

WiFi, in the various versions, use 2.4GHz, 5.6GHz, or 2.4GHz AND 5.6GHz.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks a lot for your insights, Jim! As you already said I guess I have no choice but to purchase this gear and see the results.

There are another set of these wireless SCART transmitters that operate on 2.4 GHz. Now that'd clearly interfere with regular wifi. No wonder that those devices are considerably cheaper.

I've also tried to transmit SCART over 20 metres of CAT5e cable but unsurprisingly the crosstalk was so heavy that the picture became blurry and the audio noisy.

If anyone knows about a long distance (at least 20 metres) wired solution please let me know. I rather trust wires and those wouldn't interfere with wireless appliances.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

5.8GHz wireless video will be a problem for you or your neighbors' 802.11a or 802.11n/5.8GHz (not 802.11n/2.4GHz) - but only if the frequencies chosen to use in the video sender fall in popular frequencies for 802.11n in 5.8GHz. The video sender probably has several channel choices, should a problem arise.

It won't impact 2.4GHz WiFi unless the video sender is very near (like a fraction of a meter) a WiFi device.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Video and audio over 20 ,meters is no big deal. Baseband video on 75 ohm coax will easy go 200 meters. Now, if you must have both video and audio on a single transmission medium, then a "modulator" at the camera end will output modulated RF on one of the low broadcast channels and will also easily do more than 20 meters.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

stevech:

It's bad news then. I'm not so much concerned about 2.4 Ghz WiFi. I'm rather concerned about future-proof solutions. Any possible interference is a no-no.

Jim:

Yeah, considering that CAT5e is supposed to transfer gigabit ethernet over the required distance the maximum bandwidth of the cable should be well enough for sure. It's a matter of encoding, signal levels and such.

Here's the special situation that I'm in: There is a satellite dish outside. The signal comes into the house through coax into a satellite decoder. The decoder only has SCART, S-Video and analog audio (left and right) outputs. The TVs only have SCART inputs. The distance between the decoder and the TV is about 20 metres. I've gotta transfer the signal over this distance (and preserve its quality) somehow.

Any "modulator" device which could transfer the audio and video over a (perferably cheap) cable would be a godsent. I'd appreciate such a gear but didn't find one yet.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

If TV only has SCART input, then it sounds like you are stuck with SCART.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Just to be ornery, I bet it'll work.

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

In my humble opinion, I'm always right. 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

And it's not possible to move your satellite receiver closer to your TV? That would be the obvious solution to me!

- Brian

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Geronimo: There are 4 TVs for 3 receivers and the service provider is not willing to provide more receivers. Go figure.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Looks like SCART baluns are made for me althought they're not exactly cheap.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

SCART isn't really widely used by end users, which might justify the high price. The connectors probably account for a large amount of the production costs.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

hugoboss: SCART popularity is probably highly region-specific. It's (unfortunately) still very widely used in Hungary. I can buy connectors for $1 a piece. I think the analog video - CAT5 conversion electronics is the expensive part of those SCART baluns.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

SCART was used a lot in Denmark and I think in Europe in general!

But with digital flat screen TVs and all I think it is being rapidly replaced with HDMI!

- Brian

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Can't comment about SCART but I happen to have bought an AWA8820-based USB-over-2.4ghz-audio link, was cheap on ebay. It is awesome with one little but: it's an excellent multiband wifi jammer. It completely obliterates all coherent signals within about 2 metre radius around itself and when shielded in 2 layers of beer cans, wifi can be used at a respectful distance from it. 5GHz band is well covered too :)

At the same time a pair of Creative headphones that use a similar tech presents no problem at all.

The Dark Boxes are coming.