what photo sensor ???

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Hey. I have a question. Everyone knows RGB LED candles, which, when ignited, the flame is turned on LED at the same time LED changing color. What is a photo sensor that responds only to the flame, not the normally light?
Is it infra diode or infra transistor or what???

best regards

I thinks so this is infra transistor ...

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I'm usually pretty good with puzzles but this is mind blowing...

What?

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I think he is looking for a way to detect a flame.

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You wouldn't normally get a flame from an RGB candle unless the voltage was really high...

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LED candles are driven via PWM to mimick flicker and intensity, and usually are amber LED's

Photo-detectors are light sensitive devices that can either be transistor output, ttl, analog etc. Some are configured to be sensitive th specific colors of light.

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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If you are looking for a possibility to detect a flame, checkout thermopiles or 'normal' temperature sensors

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I think he's talking about a candle that has a RGB LED embedded inside it. Looks neat (I have some).

But the sensor you are looking for is indeed IR optics. doesn't matter if it's a transistor or a diode if you have the appropriate circuitry to translate optical values into readable voltage values (presumably ADC values on your AVR).

I suggest searching from Google some robots that are used for candle extinguishing (competitions on that are quite common). You might get some ideas from there.

But bare in mind, there is no way to filter out everything except flame. Sunlight also has quite a lot of IR in it, also incandescent lights etc. If you need to detect it from a close range (like the candles do) then you're better off detecting temperature rise. As far as I know that's what is used in the silicone gel candles that have the RGB LEDs in them.

Hope it answers your question.
Cheers,
-Rain-

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yes , sensor is IR , diode or transistor , work on sun , normal light (no neone lamp or led) .

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How about you accurately and with detail tell us what you want to do? THis puzzle crud is getting boring.

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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Aren't LEDs also fairly good at detecting light? I can imagine that even a normal LED generates enough current when high intensity IR is nearby.

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Why do you want to observe the brightness of an LED "candle"?

SInce the thing is controlled by PWM drivers, the circuit already "knows" the brightness. Yes, it may only be relative, but that is all you will measure with any reasonable sensor, anyway.

I can imagine that one might want it to run more brightly when there is a lot of ambient light. Again, however, that can be open-loop without needing to know how bright the "flame" is (because you already know how bright it is).

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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Hey , stop this discuse . sensor is IR transistor, if detect flame just enable small electronic and this controll PWM and RGB led , no other, if flame is big or low - doesn't matter , sensor is used just like switch. I test it and work. pls no other discuse.
easy low cost RGB light in candle from china $1.13 in 5.000qty.
that is all.
best regards

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Well YOU are the one comming to us wondering how an LED candle works. Incidentally the phototransistor probably does not detect the flame, but the ambient light to turn the candle on at dusk, and then off at dawn.

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user