Assembler: Where are the labels ?

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Does somebody know where they hide the labels of an assembler project?

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This (and a few other items in AVR Studio 4 assembler project view) are still not implemented in AVR Studio 5 (for future reference: bug 12294)

- roland

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Ohdear. That's a deal-breaker for me. I've many lengthy programs in assembler, and inability to find labels would make working on them a nightmare.

Think I'll stick with Studio 4 for now.

Scroungre

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I am really wondering why nobody else complains about that. Studio 5 without labels is quite useless for assembly coders. Yes I know it's on the bug list. But when will this "bug" be resolved? Am I the last human on this planet programming AVRs with assembler?

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Quote:

Am I the last human on this planet programming AVRs with assembler?

I've heard of an Italian in Australia...

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Assembler Forever!! :)

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Scroungre wrote:
Assembler Forever!! :)

Yup, takes forever to write anything :)
no war intended, I simply couldn't resist

where can I find

Quote:
for future reference: bug 12294)
where is the bug list ?

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Quote:

where is the bug list ?

I asked that in another thread - apparently it's internal but I guess they refer to the numbers here so you can use them in correspondence if you need to.

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And hopefully the bug numbers are used in release notes (that should at least mention what bugs are fixed in the release in Q).

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
And hopefully the bug numbers are used in release notes (that should at least mention what bugs are fixed in the release in Q).
They are, for example in the Known issues section of the release notes.

Release Notes for AS5 wrote:
Report #12852: Step out is slow.

Future release note will have a section called Bug Fixes, similar to http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resourc...

Hans-Christian

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The AVR Assembler sucks anyway. It makes the original CP/M assembler look quite sophisticated by comparison. I prefer the assembler that comes with IAR, which you can use unlimited without buying the C compiler, but unfortunately there's no way to integrate it with AVR Studio for debugging. I haven't yet worked out how to use the assembler that comes with GCC, and probably never will.

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
Quote:

Am I the last human on this planet programming AVRs with assembler?

I've heard of an Italian in Australia...

I know an Australian, in Italy, who works on Accounting Machines.

We never have time to do it right,
but we always have time to do it over

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peret wrote:
The AVR Assembler sucks anyway. It makes the original CP/M assembler look quite sophisticated by comparison. I prefer the assembler that comes with IAR, which you can use unlimited without buying the C compiler, but unfortunately there's no way to integrate it with AVR Studio for debugging. I haven't yet worked out how to use the assembler that comes with GCC, and probably never will.

You just need to find a copy of "Using as" along with becoming familiar with "avr32-objdump". Its not that bad really.

Try this link
http://sourceware.org/binutils/d...

We never have time to do it right,
but we always have time to do it over

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Quote:

I haven't yet worked out how to use the assembler that comes with GCC, and probably never will.

Create a Studio project with just a .S and you are halfway there. Explore -nostartfiles for the full solution.

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Papabravo wrote:
You just need to find a copy of "Using as" along with becoming familiar with "avr32-objdump". Its not that bad really.

Wow, someone must have spent nearly an hour writing that documentation. But it must have taken a little longer to make sure that as syntax is incompatible with the native assemblers for all the different processor families, so that no assembler source code can ever be imported but has to be created from scratch. The effort that went in to selecting the line comment characters alone is truly impressive.
Quote:
The line comment character is `;' on the ARC; `@' on the ARM; `;' for the H8/300 family; `;' for the HPPA; `#' on the i386 and x86-64; `#' on the i960; `;' for the PDP-11; `;' for picoJava; `#' for Motorola PowerPC; `#' for IBM S/390; `#' for the Sunplus SCORE; `!' for the Renesas / SuperH SH; `!' on the SPARC; `#' on the ip2k; `#' on the m32c; `#' on the m32r; `|' on the 680x0; `#' on the 68HC11 and 68HC12; `#' on the RX; `;' on the TMS320C6X; `#' on the Vax; `;' for the Z80; `!' for the Z8000; `#' on the V850; `#' for Xtensa systems;

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Porting native assembler code was never the intention. There are probably parts that don't even have a native assembler so to speak. Have you seen one for the AVR32?

We never have time to do it right,
but we always have time to do it over

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Papabravo wrote:
Porting native assembler code was never the intention. There are probably parts that don't even have a native assembler so to speak. Have you seen one for the AVR32?

Straw man argument. If a part doesn't have a native assembler, nobody writes assembly code for it. If a family of processors - eg, Intel - has used a consistent assembler syntax for about forty years, it behooves anyone writing an assembler that purports to support it to recognize and follow that syntax wherever possible, because anyone capable of writing assembly code for that family will already have a familiarity with it and a code base from which they'd like to cut and paste. As far as I can see, as exists solely as a component of the GCC compilers and was never intended for, nor is fit for, creating software in its own right.

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So not true, there are large parts of the Linux kernel written in as format for 20+ architectures.

EDIT:

root@eav-ws-template:~/linux-2.6.30# find . -name \*.S | wc -l
1047
=====================================================================

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The AVR32 has no "native" assembler precisely because it was easier for Atmel to modify the open source 'as' than it was to roll their own from scratch. Forty years ago, in 1971, we did not think too much of the assemblers available for the 8008, but we did work with them and produced working products.

Hell we even built our on CPUs from 74181 ALU slices and there was nobody to write assemblers for us, ya bunch of whinners

We never have time to do it right,
but we always have time to do it over

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Papabravo wrote:
The AVR32 has no "native" assembler precisely because it was easier for Atmel to modify the open source 'as' than it was to roll their own from scratch. Forty years ago, in 1971, we did not think too much of the assemblers available for the 8008, but we did work with them and produced working products.

Speak for yourself! I thought the 8008 assembler was fantastic. It could assemble a whole 2k program during the lunch break, if the paper tape didn't jam.

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Papabravo wrote:
The AVR32 has no "native" assembler ... Hell we even built our on CPUs from 74181 ALU slices and there was nobody to write assemblers for us, ya bunch of whinners

Whiners indeed. I still have in production a device using two AM2901s driven by a bunch of 16R8 PALs. Short shrift sympathy... :wink:

But I have looked into programming an AVR32 in assembler, and I think it'll do what I want it to. Now I just have to line up a customer...

S.

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In the spirit of "you think that was bad ...", I had to hand assemble 8008 code and enter it in octal on toggle switches. I still have the original "MCS8 - 8008 Users Manual", complete with coffee stains.

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I hate the intel assembler instruction names, for 8080 I have only used a Z80 assembler.

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If it has opcodes, it's got assembler. The mnemonics may be oddball, but it's got assembler.

S.