Wanted: old geezers and their opines

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That's not fair, I never said the ASR-33 was my first! That was a Frieden flexowriter with that sexy black tarpaper scent...

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Quote:
My first teletype was a Model 15.

Had one of those too, but my very first one was a Creed 7B.
I believe it was English.

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

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..my first teletype had a chisel tip and used stone tablets...none of this weak paper stuff.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Quote:
my first teletype had a chisel tip and used stone tablets

And that is when you cut your teeth on ASM no doubt...!

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

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OK, dak664 & ldevries made the cut. (I'll leave it up to you to decide if that's a good thing...)

Had to send the js comment to the research department.

Last Edited: Mon. Mar 7, 2011 - 02:06 AM
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... mine was a carbon based unit ... a burnt stick from the fire on a new piece of flat stone. The used stones got sold to JS :lol: Go on, I dare you ...

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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New technology can be painful, even causing permanent scarring. Hope you were not a damaged beta tester.

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The previous version was my unburnt stick scratching in the sand ... but the client wanted a more permanent storage/output. A real hot design ...

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Real engineers don't use *programming* - they merely arrange the starting conditions of the universe such that a suitably programmed system appears when required.

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barnacle wrote:
Real engineers don't use *programming* - they merely arrange the starting conditions of the universe such that a suitably programmed system appears when required.

Nmea to that.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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LDEVRIES wrote:

Had one of those too, but my very first one was a Creed 7B.
I believe it was English.

I had a Creed 7B also. It was standard post-war Civil Defense equipment and when CD was disbanded, thousands of them came on the surplus market. I bought mine for next to nothing, still in its original waxed paper wrappings. Apart from being so noisy that you couldn't stay in the room with it, it was very s-l-o-w, six characters a second. For program listings with hex code it was even worse, since every second or third character was a letter/number shift. My friend had a Creed 75, that could run at 10 cps and had an acoustic hood, but it still suffered from the hexadecimal hit.

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In about 1976 a HAM gave me a non-functional CREED 7B.
I leraned a lot from that machine about mechanics
and serial data transmission. The start-bit is really
impressive on those machines.

Later (1977) I got a LO15 Lorentz machine

http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index....

I operated that with my 8080 system. The machine still
stands in my old hobby-room at my parents.

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ossi wrote:
In about 1976 a HAM gave me a non-functional CREED 7B.
I leraned a lot from that machine about mechanics
and serial data transmission. The start-bit is really
impressive on those machines.

Yes, it was an amazing learning tool, with all the mechanism out in the open. You could turn it by hand and watch the cams set and the type wheel spin to position as you manually clocked in a serial character. I understood serial comms theoretically, but there's nothing like having a worked example at your fingertips.

I searched for a long time for its close relative the Typex, but was never able to get my hands on one.

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OK, this is way OT from Chuck's post, but he did invite 'opines', so here's an observation.

This discussion about teletypes has been on my mind and shows how far semiconductor technology has taken us in fifty years. Teletype technology seems so primitive now. For those of us that used teletypes, it's been a pretty amazing journey, right?

But as amazing as it's been, living organisms still out-perform semiconductors in some recognition tasks and in some metrics like information storage density.

So where I'm going with this? As I understand it, the technology of living organisms has more in common with the teletype than with semiconductor technology. Proteins form electro-mechanical machines with levers, cams, and motors that carry out the business of our cells. Certainly the scale and complexity of life can't be compared to a teletype, but they share some common technology.

< ... standing by for comments about some forumite evolving from a teletype.>

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"Mr. Watson.... Come here! I want you!"

Imagecraft compiler user

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Quote:
this is way OT from Chuck's post, but...

I already have what I want, and I do appreciate all the comments and observations.

I do think we need a "spit and whittle" forum where the old farts can gather and reminisce. Them young 'uns might even learn something, and it keeps all of us off the streets.

I had some sort of 5 bit baudot teletype - model 15 (?) seems to stick in my mind. Gives you a real appreciation for escape codes when your character set only has 32 characters. It was quite a beast, and an elegant work of art at the same time.

Chuck Baird

"I wish I were dumber so I could be more certain about my opinions. It looks fun." -- Scott Adams

http://www.cbaird.org

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