New to AVR. Planning to make a dev board.

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Quote:

I've looked all over the 'net and I found PLENTY of posts about getting the fuses wrong.

Indeed - this is something they "fixed" in Xmega. It's almost impossible to make them uncontactable.

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Hi All,
I must thank you all for all the advice and inputs. :-) My board is a bit functional now. I am yet to add a ULN2803, a DB9 and MAX232, and maybe a JTAG too (later) Here is a picture of the board:
Not too neat or well thought-out, but hey, it works! :-)

Attachment(s): 

-Aashish.
If you don't see it coming, you'll never know what hit you...

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Actually it's very clean looking. I like the extra GND pin, those are always helpful for meters and scopes. I try to use a loop of wire soldered into 2 holes, then I can't stab myself when I lean on the board or pick it up grabbing in the wrong place.

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Looking good! It's laid out pretty nicely compared to others I've seen. Having something like that around is a big help. It means you don't have to mess with the breadboard all the time.

Good job! :P

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Nice point to point work. Can you show a view of the back side (wiring)? I would add a bridge rectifier to the input just in case you one day plug in an AC wall wart by accident in place of the DC one you now have. It's also protection from wall warts that are wired in reverse at the plug (it does happen).

Here is a link to the board I am using:
http://fun4diy.com/
http://fun4diy.com/AT40B.pdf

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kscharf wrote:
Nice point to point work.
Here is a link to the board I am using:
http://fun4diy.com/
http://fun4diy.com/AT40B.pdf
Thanks for the link. I could surely use the max232 part atleast. :-)
Thanks all, for encouraging words! :-)
Will post reverse side pic soon, though its not pretty...

-Aashish.
If you don't see it coming, you'll never know what hit you...

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Here is a pic of the board flipped over from right to left. Told you its not pretty... :oops:

Attachment(s): 

-Aashish.
If you don't see it coming, you'll never know what hit you...

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I suggest for use with a Mega16 development board that you get the following connectors:

1 MiniDin6 female (DigiKey CP-2460-ND) - this is for an older PS2 keyboard with a purple connector. These are easy to interface and are the best and cheapest way to enter character data into your system. The QWERTY keys can act as general-purpose tactile switches as needed in the beginning of your progress.

(DigiKey part #: CP-102A-ND) 2.1mm power jack with PCB pins -- These are very useful for standardizing your power connections between the main AVR dev board and any auxiliary boards.

DIN5 MIDI jack PCB_mount :DigiKey part # CP-2350-ND :
get two of these. MIDI is one of the most underused but most fun and creative applications of DIY AVR boards. Everyone wants to make little robots; no one wants to make wonderful music and spacy sounds. MIDI is a great way to learn interfacing and applications to microcontrollers. For MIDI input, you need an opto-isolator. The Sharp PC900 is the best for MIDI work (DigiKey #: 425-2204-5-ND). Used MIDI synth tone modules (music circuitry without piano keyboards) are available on eBay. You can always resell any tone module on eBay for what you paid for it so eBay acts like a free musical instrument rental service.

- Definitely get an inexpensive LCD character display. They are cheap and almost all of them use the same driver chip: Hitachi HD44780. They are easy to interface to the AVR and are the best way to show information cheaply. You will need some way to show system information (SRAM and register values, etc..) when debugging if you don't have a JTAG-ICE or Dragon. LCD char displays are the best way to do it.

Get five or ten 78L05 or 78L33 voltage regulator ICs.

Instead of potentiometers, get a few rotary encoders with push switches and learn to interface with them.

Get also a temperature sensor like the DS 18S20 one-wire. Also a real-time clock IC. Don't forget a 32KHz crystal and coin-cell battery for the real-time clock IC.

Serial EEPROMs are easy to interface. They are not expensive for the 'one step below the latest-greatest' for example 24LC256. These ICs can store a lot of data.

I recommend www.taydaelectronics.com for getting high quality inexpensive parts. Don't miss the $0.54 Audio echo IC PT2399 that is hidden away in their catalog listings. They are in Thailand, but are a good reliable supplier at 1/3 to 1/10th cost of standard electronic distributors.

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aashish_delhi wrote:
Here is a pic of the board flipped over from right to left. Told you its not pretty... :oops:

Nonsense! It's a thing of beauty. You should see some of my point to point wired boards. They become plates of spaghetti when there are lots of chips on them. Sometimes they even work! BTW I don't always use the kind of boards that have solder pads for all the parts. Those get rather expensive! I sometimes just use unclad perf board. I apply copper foil tape to where I need long traces, and since I use sockets I point to point wire at the sockets, no need for solder pads. I also can glue down small bits of copper clad board (cut with a punch) using super glue to join wire lead parts. Not pretty, but beauty in in the function.

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@Simonetta: Thanks for all the great ideas! However, it will take me a while to implement a few of those since I am just starting out. :-)

@kscharf: Here is a pic of my power supply. Its an unregulated supply with just a 6V transformer, a diode bridge and a cap. I use a 7805 on the board to make it usable.

Attachment(s): 

-Aashish.
If you don't see it coming, you'll never know what hit you...

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