Pulse Detection

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Hi,

I have recently been given an assignment to run a program on ATMEGA16 when a pulse is given. I know how to detect high on a pin, but how do I detect 1 pulse?

I have 1 switch and 1 pulse. So when I turn on the switch and give 1 pulse, my simple led blinking code should execute. I am detecting the switch with (PINA & 0x01) code but what about the pulse?

Please suggest me and some code would be really nice since I am very new to this. Thank you.

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Raquib wrote:
I know how to detect high on a pin, but how do I detect 1 pulse?
Detect a high on the pin and then go to a piece of code that detects low on the pin. When the low is detected, you have detected a pulse...

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Martin, thank you for your reply. But suppose the duration between high and low on my pulse is large. How do I actually detect high and low in a certain duration? Suppose I want to detect if there is 1 complete pulse (1 High and 1 low) in any 1 second. Can you please help me on this? Thank you.

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so run a timer so that you can see how long the pulse took.

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Quote:
Please suggest me and some code would be really nice since I am very new to this.

But NOT so new that you can't be ASSIGNED something to do with an MCU.
Quote:
I have recently been given an assignment to run a program...

So i hope nobody's "nice"(sucker) enough to give you anything more than a few clues so YOU ALONE can write your own code. If you're an engineering student you BETTER get used to solving problems, esp. the simple ones.

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If you want to limit the length of a pulse, it will be necessary for you to decide just what those time constraints are. Is a pulse valid if it goes high for greater than 1 ms, greater than 100 ms, less than 1 s. Once you know the times you can build a simple state machine ( FSM ) and check when each state begins against a timer. Note, however, that the pulse detection logic is the same regardless - validating based on time is just added functionality to the basic pulse detection FSM.

It can be something as simple as the following pseudo-code,

state = Wait
start_time = timer_value
loop forever:
  switch state:
    case Wait:
      if input goes high:
        start_time = timer_value
        state = MeasureHigh

    case MeasureHigh:
      if input goes low:
        high_time = timer_value - start_time
        pulse is valid if high_time is in range
        state = Wait
end loop

Depending on the rest of the program, the state machine can be integrated into the rest of the main loop, or kept seperate as above, placed in a function that acts on global variables, or in a function that requires you to pass in the variables - design is entirely up to your project's requirements.

Martin Jay McKee

As with most things in engineering, the answer is an unabashed, "It depends."