Oscilloscope Opinions?

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I have been using Tek scopes since college. But now, it's time for me to purchase a scope for myself and there are several good players out there that I am just not familiar with. With a budget of $5000 who makes the best bang for the buck mixed signal scope? Tektronix? Yokogawa? Agelent? LeCroy?

I'm currently considering the Yokogawa DLM2000. Does anybody have experience with this model?

My applications are mostly embedded. SPI, I2C, ADCs, SMPS. Processors are typically <100MHz.

Your opinions are appreciated.

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

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http://www.scope-of-the-art.com/... - pure scope porn.

I only saw an early version, and have no idea if an oscilloscope in the series fits your budget.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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For home use as a hobbyist

I have a TEK TDS-320 witch i'm quite happy with , it's an old 100Mhz , and i guess some of the Experienced (read "Seasoned") guyzz prob have used it when it was "Top of the line".

Pros: Reliable , Uncle Bob says it has a good trigger.
Cons: Takes up lots of space , and you need ear protection , as the fans are LOoooud.

But recently i bought a Rigol DS-1052E 50Mhz , and am very happy with it.

Later on i bought a Rigol DS-1102E 100Mhz , but just because i "had to" when i heard the price.
A friend was in China and got a "Native Chinese" to buy it on "TaoBao" (Chinas eBay) , and i ended up getting it for 20% less than i payed for the 1052. And my friend brought it back to me.

This translates to US$ 414.30 for a 100Mhz
http://item.taobao.com/item.htm?...

The 50Mhz is now in the summerhouse.

Since i got the Rigol's , i rarely powers up the Tek.
It happens once in a while if i need more than 2 channels , or if i am in doubt about the Rigol showing the correct thing. But the Rigol has never been wrong yet.

The Rigol "PC-Scope" program "Ultrascope" i think it's called , looks like a 99,9% clone of
TEK's Wavestar that i use for the TDS-320 (I'd even say it's the same).

But to be honest i mostly use an USB Stick , to transfer scope pictures to my PC.
It's faster than starting up the Ultrascope.

Well looong story , before i just have discovered that your signature tells me that you aren't a hobbyist.

Seems like the Germans like the Yokogawa ...
Try to run these 3 through google translate ,
http://www.mikrocontroller.net/t... - The DLM2024 Yokogawa won here
http://www.mikrocontroller.net/t...
http://www.mikrocontroller.net/t...

Sorry for the "Noise" ....

/Bingo

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This oscilloscope from rohde&schwarz is really state of the art! I saw it in munich at the electronica 2010 fare. But the price is also hot. Without any decoder (spi,UART etc.) you will have to spend more than 20k$ !!
Have a look at the new devices from Hameg. e.g. the HMO3522 2. Hameg is a very reliable brand. If you want to spend a little more than 5k try the wavesurfer series from LeCroy.

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Thanks for the addition of Hameg to my list.

I'm using a TDS2012 that is very handy and available for under $2000. But, it would be nice to graduate up to something that can help do some serious digital debugging.

I have a USB scope that does well, but I find the mouse interface to be out of place on the test bench. I guess I desire real knobs and buttons rather than virtual ones.

The Yokogawa seems to have the deepest sample buffer than any of the others.

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

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I just bought a TEK MSO 2012. 16 digital channels and 2 Analog. The scope itself is fine, but I was disappointed that there was a bug in the bus translation software ( it does not work). Also, I was disappointed to find that it was made in China.

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Bingo600: looks like you didnt hear about this:

http://www.eevblog.com/2010/04/1...

turn your DS1052 into a DS1102 just by communicating via serial cable (its software limited!). Thats a $300 difference for free if you look at normal website costs on the rigols.

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tkurowski wrote:
Bingo600: looks like you didnt hear about this:

http://www.eevblog.com/2010/04/1...

turn your DS1052 into a DS1102 just by communicating via serial cable (its software limited!). Thats a $300 difference for free if you look at normal website costs on the rigols.

I do know , and have done it on my 1052

But the final sw hack was released a few weeks later after i got my 1102E , and the 1102E was still cheaper than my 1052 :-)

/Bingo

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I'm not going to tell you what scope to buy. I will give you a couple of things to think about that you perhaps might not have considered yet.

1) Memory depth. With more and more parts moving to high-speed serial interfaces, having a deep memory on the scope is really important. For example, if you were running at 1 Giga-sample sampling rate, and you wanted to collect 50 milliseconds worth of data at that speed, you'd need 50 mega-samples (50 mega-points) memory depth. That's for one channel. Memory depth was a critical factor when I purchased my most recent scope.

2) Availability of decent FET probes. Make sure that the probes you might need in the future are available, in a reasonable time and at a reasonable price. You might not be dealing with an LVDS interface today as an example, but if you do in the future, you want to be sure your scope and probes are up to the task.

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guys can we get near 2GHz with 5000$?

I love Digital
and you who involved in it!

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I must have admit that I never worked with a very
expensive scope. I have a TDS3032 at my workspace
and a 20MHz Hameg at home.

I think that a huge trace buffer is really useful,
but you must have the software to analyse that
amount of data also. I think hand-analysing some
serial protocols is really hard

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Tek DPO2000 series are quite nice but the rotary knobs are absolutely Tek-unworthy. It can easily export 1 megasamples into an Excel sheet for further analysis.

It's a pity that with such big screen they could not arrange the measurement pane in such way that they don't obscure the lower part of the waveform pane.

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Take note of the $5000 budget, folks; this is no hobby 'scope. I'm not familiar with this mid-range stuff, only low end (100MHz Rigol and old 300MHz analog Tek), but what is important for me is:
1) memory depth and capability to write to it, especially for mixed signals -- it may not be the same as full bandwidth with all channels. Because of this I got a separate logic analyzer (SUMP [link])
2) interface ease of use. I have to be able to get a signal on screen within a couple of seconds. This means trying out one in the same line.

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Yes, that budget allows for a nice Tek scope :)

Features I also like on the DPO2000: the ability to label each trace and the USB interface for easy transfer of waveform data/screen shot to an USB flash stick.

Weird trigger modes other then the normal edge trigger can come in handy sometimes.

http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/83460.pdf

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You end up paying a premium for a scope with LA functionality.

I have the rigol for analog stuff, and a salea Logic analyzer.

For logic analyzer, you really need the ability to quickly pan, zoom, and scroll. You want lots of screen real estate to see all the signals at the same time, and huge memory depth. PC is good for that, it has lots of RAM for memory depth, large screen not some 5" LCD screen. Bandwidth of USB is not great, salea can only do a max of 24 million samples per second.

For a scope, you want something that has physical buttons that you can quickly and easily change the time base, voltage scalling, AC/DC couple, etc... I suppose with great software this is possible with a PC scope, but I have not seen a software scope with software that is as easy and intuitive as on a real scope. I use my scope alot, the Rigol takes a few seconds to turn on and I can immediately start working.

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I bought a PoScope a while back for the logic analyzer. But the last project I analyzed had a 20 bit SPI interface and I couldn't use it for that. Maybe I need to upgrade the software.

Thanks for all the great tips. I have some more scopes to check out now.

Thanks.

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

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Poscope is not very good. I have 2 of them, i bought 2 because at the time there was nothing affordable on the market and I thought it was such a good deal.

I found the software very clumsy, looked like something from the early 90s. Not sure if they improved it in the last 2 years, last time I used it was 2 years ago.

As a scope, the sample rate is just too low, ~100khz.

The signal generator on it is horrible, you can not generate a signal on it below 1khz (might be 100 hz, I forget).

The LA function is ok, do not quite remember it much, I just remember that I was not overly impressed but not overly horrified.

There is also a problem with USB and certain motherboard chipsets. Worked on my desktop but not my laptop.

In between the; poor software, low sampling rate, limited signal generator, and potential that it will just not work with your PC, I would not recommend it. If you know for certain it works on your PC, then it is a reasonably priced tool so long as you know it's limitations.

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It looks like with the accessories that the Yokogawa has lost to the DPO2014. Is the video/ethernet option worth the extra $410?

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

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The guys at Test Equity gave me a great deal. Tek was offering a free application module and I bought a second. I was able to upgrade to the DPO2024 and get two application modules and remain in my budget. I am quite happy.

Thanks for all the advice and direction.

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

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I am in the market for a i can to use a scanner that had built the ultra hanatech scope. I sold it to buy an X431 now I need a new scope. I do not want something expensive something simple and portable so you can check the speed sensors, engine acceleration, etc.

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Have you looked at my oscillocope table?
You can filter and sort the items to find what thye oscilloscope you need. I only included oscilloscopes available for under $500.00.

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gr82bdad wrote:
I have been using Tek scopes since college. But now, it's time for me to purchase a scope for myself and there are several good players out there that I am just not familiar with. With a budget of $5000 who makes the best bang for the buck mixed signal scope? Tektronix? Yokogawa? Agelent? LeCroy?

I'm currently considering the Yokogawa DLM2000. Does anybody have experience with this model?

My applications are mostly embedded. SPI, I2C, ADCs, SMPS. Processors are typically <100MHz.

Your opinions are appreciated.

Be sure to get a DSO.