Have you ever seen an AA alkaline do this?

Go To Last Post
11 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi,

I filled an 8xAA battery carrier with 8 new alkaline batteries (eveready gold). Unit powers on fine. Turn ed it off. They sat like this for a couple of days. Then today I take the back cover off and add a label to it, put it back on. Unit still powers on and off just fine. Then an hour later I notice the back cover is WARM, which is not expected. I open up the case and 1 of the batteries is really warm. The others near it are warm, but not like the one. I pull all the batteries. I let them cool for awhile and measure them. The really warm one comes up 60% remaining (zts pulse load tester) and the other 7 come up 100% remaining. I've put 8 new batteries in the unit and they are all cold so far. I tried to test or see any sort of short in the batter holder, but it looks fine. Can an alkaline just go haywire like this? Outside of the battery holder it has returned to cold...

Thanks,

Alan

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

For alkaline cells the top button and cylindrical case are welded together as the cell positive,
while the cell negative is an insulated button on the cell bottom, the cell is covered with a
thin plastic film to insulate the positive cell case. This plastic film can be easily cut through
by contacting hardware like a screw head to short the cell positive to chassis/common.
This was a big problem with Eberline equipment using Cambion cell holders that had metal
retainers designed for the old zinc cells.

For standard zinc-carbon and zinc-chloride cells the cylindrical case and bottom are the cell
negative and the insulated button on top is the cell positive. I remember these having a
cardboard liner covering the cell, it's been many years since I've used any.

Stan

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi Stan,

More investigation of the battery shows it to be the issue. It has a plastic type covering and the bottom of the cell (where the + and - are in close proximity) the plastic is pulled away allowing both conductors to be exposed. The battery holder spring must have been touching BOTH and shorting the cell against itself...

Thanks,

Alan

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

And if it had been NiCd, NiMh, LiPo you may have had an explosion/fire on your hand. Makes you think doesn't it! :cry:

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi,

Sure does. I think eveready could have done a better job on isolating the poles on the battery, that is for sure. Just one more thing for me to check: Check batteries for too much open area on the bottom, put them in holder, wait 5 minutes, feel them for temperature!

Thanks,

Alan

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

China, Inc.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

You could build and install an AVR-powered temperature monitor in the battery case... make it beep if a cell gets warm. The automatic solution? :)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Had a similar experience with a 8cell nimh package for a RC controller. It is made so that you could either use 8xAA alcalic batteries, or the 8cell nimh package. The clamp for holding alcaline batteries tear a hole in the nimh package, shorting the positive to ground. It was not a perfect short so did not notice until i had the airplane in the air and the controller started peeping quite desperatly. Luckily got the plane safely down to earth before the controller died.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

China Inc.... Nonsense.. more likely Importer greed

China only makes sheet that will sell and they make it to a price their customers specify.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:
China Inc.... Nonsense.. more likely Importer greed

Both have their guilty... If it is on the marker someone will buy and sell so it's competitor must find something to fight too..

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

This is a compatibility issue. Either battery or a carrier does not meet standards. You were lucky these batteries have a relatively high series resistance. You would not want to short lithium primary cell.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!