Which AVR device to use?

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I'm a newbie and want to start using AVR microcontroller. There are so many devices and I'm confused which one to choose.

I googled and found a lot of opinions :? A few of them suggested ATtiny , a couple of them ATmega 16 , ATmega 32.. I'm just wondering which one to use.

At the moment, as 'm a beginner, I'd like to use it mainly for glowing LED nd stuff , stepper motors rotation. Gradually would like to advance to build a line following bot nd similar apps.

Kindly Help me in picking the device that would suit these needs.

Thanks in advance

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did you check on arduino and other 'development/play' platforms?

or do you want to make your own PCB and work from that?

I personally started with a mega168, but that was because I had a failing product at work that I could take home with me to play with and that had a mega168 on it.

for glowing a led you could do with a tiny85, but as it has only 8 pins(including reset and supply) you will soon run out of pins if you want to do a bit more experimenting.

Mega16 and Mega32 are no bad choises, they have lots of functions and IO pins. BUt it all boils down to what you can get your hands on and what you want to do now and in the future. So perhaps think of a number of projects that you would like to do and write down what you might need in them. and then decide on what to go for.

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Thanks for the reply meslomp.

Suppose I start working on some complex stuff in the near future, Though at the moment its too hard to be think of specefic examples, Which device should I go for?

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Not everyone will agree with this, but I would say you should start with the biggest and newest DIP ATmega you can get, which would be the ATmega 1284P. This will give you plenty of pins and peripherals to work with so you will get a good idea of everything you can do. Then once you learn more, you will be able to pick out a more appropriate MCU for each project by estimating code size and looking at the data sheets to find the peripherals you need. The ATMega 1284P is only about $7.50, so you won't go broke by buying a couple and using them to learn what you can do.

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Cool.
I'd check out that.

Thanks a lot :)

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Quote:

Not everyone will agree with this, but I would say you should start with the biggest and newest DIP ATmega you can get, which would be the ATmega 1284P.

I'd agree. You are unlikely to "outgrow" a 1284P. Designs you develop on it may be "downsized" into 164/324/644P.

Another approach (for 28 rather than 40 pin design) is to start with the 328PA and then you can downsize the final designs into 168/88/48PA

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Quote:
you should start with the biggest and newest DIP ATmega you can get

that's absolutely true. that's why all the devboards are stuffed with the biggest and fattest chip in the line-up, precisely because of that.

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That's just about what I did. I was going to do some LCD work using SPI and have never done it before. I had no idea exactly what I needed, so I got the mega644. Did my development and eventually got everything I needed into a Tiny84. So to build my project, I used the smaller, cheaper Tiny84 and still have my honkin mega644 for other development.

Jim M., Rank amateur AVR guy.

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That's why the expensive model arduino has a 1280. There are cheaper models. Get one of those.

Imagecraft compiler user

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Any ATmega with a JTAG interface. The smallest parts that meet that description are in 40pin dip packages or 44pin TQFP smt packages. The cheapest variant would be the atmega164, family members include the '324, '644, and the '1284. Other 'small' chips with JTAG include the atmega16, atmega32, and the atmega162. The latter can use external sram memory or I/O. The atmega1284 is real nice with 16kb of internal sram, it will run NutOs nicely (but configuring NutOs is not for begineers). Get an AVR Dragon so you can use the JTAG feature.

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I like the small ones like the tiny85V. There is not as much beef as the megas, but often I just need a couple of pins, but like a small chip (in size) to hide is in the toy I'm building.

Depending on what you want to build you probably want different sizes anyway, so buy some of each.

In any case, if you don't plan to build lots of units I'd take the chip with the most feature/memory in a particular size. The cost difference is small and the comfort gain by not having to save each bit is huge.

Markus