House Hold AVR products

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Hello everyone. I was just wondering after I took apart my moms paper shredder to clean it. Are there any everyday household products that use an AVR? I remember watching an avrtube video where it shows arrows pointing to everyday things and it said "avr inside". But have any of you came across an avr in anything you've taken apart (commercial products).

Well just a thought but thanks

David

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I've heard that there are AVRs in certain set top boxes. I saw one in a Sirius radio 3 or 4 years ago. Our company puts em in Hi end Auto Gauges (Mcnallyelectronics.com)

Imagecraft compiler user

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Yep. A battery charger I hacked appeared to be AVR-controlled.
And about everything I create, but that's no surprise I guess ;)

Nard

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tricia, and Ulyana. You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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Well in Europe there's a few million of these: http://www.amstrad.com/products/... in user's homes. Each contains either a mega8 or a mega16.

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I worked an internship for a small startup that contracted to make audio/video routers. I worked on programming changes for the microcontroller which was an Atmega2560.

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XM radio receivers each have 2 AVR's, one mega128 for the front panel and LCD, and one mega32 as system controller.

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I have a Honeywell digital household thermostat that is based on an AVR. The original X-Box hand controllers also used AVR's.

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.

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Second the Honeywell 0648, an ATMEGA32L running a nice LCD display. I got it from a dumpster and use it as a clock/calendar/temperature display at the workbench!

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I have a multi-colored, color cycling light bulb for my hot tub that uses a ATtiny13.

Kind of a neat application. It replaces the existing standard bulb and screws into the existing socket. It takes 12v AC input. Power cycling is used to program the desired color sequence.

I've thought about re-programming it as it appears that somebody screwed up the clock rate/or delays since when in color wash mode, it cycles through the full color wash sequences way too fast.

To me it should be a relaxing slow color wash cycle over several minutes, but instead it flips through all the colors every 3-5 seconds.
Those modes are quite disturbing to me.

---

I've also got a dome light dimmer in my car that uses a attiny45. - but that was a 3rd party aftermarket product.

--- bill

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I used an 8515 AVR in an early prototype of the Irisys thermal imager:

http://www.irisys.co.uk/thermal-imaging/our-products.aspx

It was changed to an NXP ARM when it was redesigned a year later.

I helped design a comms hub for them that used a PIC (sorry about that) and four 2313 AVR chips.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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How many AVRs are out there that are disguised with a custom part#? Or worse, hidden in a blob of epoxy.

Only AVRs I've seen in the wild are on Noritake-Itron VFD graphic modules.

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My father's diabetes meter works with an AVR.

Michael.

User of:
IAR Embedded Workbench C/C++ Compiler
Altium Designer

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wow! Those are exactly the answers I was looking for! any others? My dad is a HUGE fan of XM radio. I think we have a few extra receivers around the house

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I had a KVM switch that used an AVR and an X10 Ninja pan and tild mount for a camera.

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I have a Logitech Wireless Desktop, which has an AVR in the mouse (a Tiny, don't remember which one).
Don't know about the keyboard or receiver, but I'd expect them to have AVR's in them too.

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Early Buffalo Linkstation NAS devices contained an AT90S2313 for some secondary functions. Later models had it replaced by some Freescale M68HC08.

One of my soldering stations is controlled by an Atmel MCU. I am not sure if it is an AVR or a 8051. I didn't pay much attention when I had it open.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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Some of my flashlights drivers use ATtiny13V.

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Years ago, most TV set top boxes used AVRs.
(private label part numbers of course, but hackers figured it out).

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Not quite ordinary household items, but...

... the Robotis Bioloid CM-5 controller, and the AX-12+ "Dynamixel" digital servos are all AVR-based. The CM-5 has a Mega128. The servos have a Mega8.

The same servos are used by CrustCrawler's AX-12+ based arm (I have the 7 servos, now I just need to buy the rest of the kit... sigh...)

... the SunSPOT is *full* of 'em. The mainboard's "big" chip is an Atmel ARM9, but it also has at least one Mega8 for the battery charger. Its sensor/interface board has a Mega88.

There's no place like ~/

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I have a brushless DC motor controller for RC-planes that use a mega8, producer is Dynam. El cheapo so it is kind of buggy.

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iRobot's domestic robot cleaners - Roomba, etc.

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I'm surprised no one said the arduino....

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DavidDee wrote:
I'm surprised no one said the arduino....
Household/common consumer item? not!

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stevech wrote:
DavidDee wrote:
I'm surprised no one said the arduino....
Household/common consumer item? not!

...true. I was going more along the lines of commercial products but If I included that you'd have to include a ton of other other things

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Paddy wrote:
Yess ! also found one : my AUYUE soldering station contains an AT89C51 dil version
Are you sure ... maybe it just got sucked into the station instead :lol:

OK ... a slight diversion on the topic ... where have you delivered Atmel based equipment that might seem unusual? My contribution is Intel Malaysia. I have designed and delivered two different designs that are now working in quantity in one of their plants in Penang.

Cheers,

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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I can't remember if Carel, Dixel or Elliwell thermostats have AVR's inside. Certain ultrasonic level controller (now discontinued), some temperature logging systems also. It seems that thermal management equipment in Europe is switching to AVR's now.

Some other industrial appliances seem to use them also.

Guillem.
"Common sense is the least common of the senses" Anonymous.

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Well we owned a Wolff DBL Oven in our home and it had some problems. During a service call the repair guys replaced the main board and wiring harness. They handed me the parts and there was an Atmega128 on board running the whole show!

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Paddy wrote:
Yess ! also found one : my AUYUE soldering station contains an AT89C51 dil version

BUT that's not an AVR! :P

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.

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My CNC mill has either a Mega 8 or 16 controlling the PWM for the spindle speed...

It's a Syil conversion of a Sieg SX-3...

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Hey,

I came across some street light and Traffic controller based on ATmega8 at Bangalore recently. Many of the Inverters now boast an AVR generally ATmega8535.

AVR Rulez...;-)

Warm Regards,
Boseji
http://m8051.blogspot.com/

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When you are stopped at a red light, do you disassemble it to check the MCU? :)

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Well, in case one did not see it, the Atmel web site states that the AVR XMega and the AVR32 have been selected for the iBiquity Digital HD Radio reference designs. It states that this is the basis for many consumer products.

JC

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I saw a DIL version of a AT90S1200 some many years on a PC motherboard. I don't have a clue as to what it was doing there, but it was nice to see it there.

There are pointy haired bald people.
Time flies when you have a bad prescaler selected.

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There are a few thousand controlling motor speeds on rooftops, probably on one near you!

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

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steve17 wrote:
When you are stopped at a red light, do you disassemble it to check the MCU? :)

Actually I was walking on the pavement near the Traffic light post where a service engineer was replacing some old boards which contained PIC16F876 with AVR ones. I was happy to see that.

AVR Rulez...;-)

Warm Regards,
Boseji
http://m8051.blogspot.com/

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This traffic statistics system has a 'Mega128 in it:
http://www.kustomsignals.com/product_body2.asp?product_id=32&cat_id=6&strpagename=speed
(at least it still did a few years ago when I worked there)

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They don't use the "Hornblower Traffic Safety System" from "Digital Research" anymore?

(It was an example that came with the MAC assembler for CP/M)

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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Paddy wrote:
Yess ! also found one : my AUYUE soldering station contains an AT89C51 dil version
Is it the model 2900 or some other that uses the quick change tips that contain the heater and sensor?

My AOYUE 2900 has the AT89C2051. At random intervals it gets a sensor error and shuts off power to the tip. I suspect it is bad contact between the tip and the contacts in the handle. I've cleaned the contacts and the tip and bent the contacts to cause more pressure at the contacts. It works better but it sometimes still has the problem. I'm thinking of buying another handle and cord assembly.

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Steve wrote:

Quote:
I'm thinking of buying another handle and cord assembly.

Save that cost, Steve :)

Open up the handle. Small PCB inside where wires from the element are soldered to the cable.
Problem: heating element wires cannot be (soft) soldered. Should have been spot welded. Try to tin them. Even with some flux and proper sanding :(
Heat sensor wires are do-able.
What I did: I clamped a thin copper tubing over the cleaned and sanded heater element wires, and THEN soldered the copper to the cable. Works now for years, without the annoying OFF flashing on the led-display.

My suspicion was also on the connector to the base unit. I even disassembled the control board to clean off residu flux. All those possible troublemakers didn't do it. It came all down to the element wires.

Nard

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tricia, and Ulyana. You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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Nard, I think you have another iron in mind. Or else I'm terribly confused. These tips have the heater and sensor sealed inside. There are 3 connections to the tip. One is earth ground, the other two are for the heater and sensor. In the picture you can see the two silver bands which are the connections to the heater and sensor. The long silver cylinder with the tip is where the ground connection is made.

The tip slides into a plastic cylinder that appears to be teflon. It contains the three contacts. The only thing I haven't examined closely is the wire to contact connections. I guess they are soldered. They are covered with short pieces of small diameter heat shring tubing.

The only thing you say that rings a bell is the display flashing. But the 3 digits of this seven segment LED display don't flash. However the otherwise unused decimal point on the rightmost digit is on when the heater is on. Normally it flashes several times a second, and if I listen closely in the vicinity of the power transformer, I can hear a ticking sound when the light flashes.

If I whack the handle hard against my hand or other object while the iron is on, the light often stops flashing for a few seconds. Usually it then resumes, and everything is okay. But sometimes it doesn't recover and the soldering station goes into it's "sensor error" mode and I have to reset it.

Of course if it only failed when I whacked it, it would be okay. Unfortunately it sometimes dies without provocation.

Attachment(s): 

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My bad :oops:

The microcontroller triggered me, and reading your message about bad contacts did the rest.
My Aoyue's are the 968 and 937.

Good value for money, these Aoyue's. Despite the poor contacts.

Nard

Edit: picture attached

Attachment(s): 

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tricia, and Ulyana. You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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I also have the AOYUE 908 which has the inexpensive tips that do not include the heater and sensor. They look like yours. This soldering station also has hot air. It works perfectly for me.

I haven't taken this one apart. I'm guessing there are 2 wires for the heater and 2 wires for the sensor.

The 2900 only has 3 wires. The same 2 are used for the heater and sensor. The heater is 70 watts 24 volts. I figure it must draw 3 amps and that would put quite a load on the contacts, that the sensor also uses.

Actually the 2900 has the same 5 pin "mic" connector where the cable attaches to the station. It has 5 wires in the cable too, but wires 1 and 2 are in parallel and connected to each other at each end. The same goes for wires 4 and 5.