Laser Jet PCB Transfers

Go To Last Post
13 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Many years back I remember transferring PCB artwork directly off a scale laser jet printout onto a copper blank circuit board using an iron as a way to create the mask. I can't remember if special paper was requried to do this or not. It's been about 15 years ago and I can't even remember if it worked well or not. Has anyone done this?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I'm doing this with the clayish paper that comes with catalogues. It works perfectly fine for 10/10 mils.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I did that once - and only once. I think I can do better with the freakin' Dalo pen.

I have made a guide on how to produce a PCB cheap and still make it professional:
http://furpile.com/MakingPCB/

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Google phrases like 'toner transfer method PCB'. It works well for some people, not so for others.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Try the Homebrew PCB Yahoo group.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I did find this video showing how to do it:

http://www.instructables.com/id/...

I was surprised to see the toner didn't come off when he was scrubbing the paper away with a toothbrush.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks for the tutorial link eskoilola, I found the Surface mount soldering technique very interesting. I didn't realize you could get a standard toaster oven hot enough to melt solder, or is that not a typical kitchen oven? Your article didn't say what temperature to set the oven too. How hot does it need to get?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Actually the thing is not an ordinary oven. It is a infrared toaster which You usually toas sasages, pizza and such. There are heating elements on the top of the "oven" that glow and radiate quite intensive heat.

Temeperature control is done by having the PCB at a suitable distance.

Actually IMO this can be done in a normal kitchen oven as well. The solder used for SMD melts well under 300 degrees celsius which most kitchen ovens are capable.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I'm not sure I want to eat food that has been prepared in an oven used to assemble PCBs, and melt solder, flux, etc.

JC

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I am doing this. I have been eating -hic- food which has been -hic- prepared in the very same oven -hic- with my PCB's.

I have had not trouble -hic- whatsoever.

-hic-

Doc, what a suitable nic for this discussion, You are absolutely right. The organic resin is very toxic. I would not bake pizza at the same time with my PCB. But, since this is not industrial scale manufacturing but merely a PCB now and then the residues are next to non existent.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I use Staples "Picture paper" and it works well, $10 for 100 sheets. I use the normal Picture Paper, There is also the high gloss stuff which I never tried.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I dry my PCB's in the oven/grille too. Hic. Separate from meat. It's hic. I mean it's okay if you let it vent.

The Dark Boxes are coming.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I've been getting great results using sticker backing paper, the toner sits 'on' it after printing but doesn't bond to it.

Lightly iron it on copperclad, then slowly peel it off, no washing / scrubbing needed, perfect transfer.

The only problem sometimes is with large black areas sometimes there is some flaking, but that's easily fixed with a sharpie before etching (it's never in a critical area)

Good luck!