Identifying capacitors

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#1
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Hello all,
after a long hiatus I am finally able to get back to electronics. During this weekend I made an inventory of the components I have, and I stumbled upon some capacitors that I cannot identify that easily.

I attached a composite picture of them.

My little knowledge would bring me to identify them as follows:
1- 10 nF (10 * 10^3 pF)
2- 100 nF
3- the label would be 10 pF, but I remember getting these when asking for 100 nF capacitors and it looks quite big for 10 pF! this should be a mica capacitor.
4- 470 nF
5- 330 nF
6- 10 nF (0.01 µF... but I'm not sure about that)

Could someone please confirm or correct me? I am currently unable to test them in any way: my DMM does not handle capacity and the capacitors are too small to quickly put together an eye-readable circuit based on a 555 in astable configuration.

Thank you very much!

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You got all the values right 100K = 100n. They all look like polycarbonate, except #3. It could be mylar film, would have to see the whole case.

Good luck

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Thank you for your answer. So, when the third digit is a zero, one should consider it as a whole number in nF (ie. 100 nF) rather than the exponent of the value in pF (ie. 10 * 10^0 = 10 * 1 = 10 pF)?
Or is the K in that case a multiplier, ie. 100 pF * 1000 = 100 nF (again)?
I thought that the K, just like J, was an indication of the tolerance.

Here is a picture of the 100K100 cap:

Thanks.

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Given the size I doubt that it's a silver-mica capacitor. Most likely mylar.

Nard

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tricia, and Ulyana. You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

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#3, 40 years ago dipped mica in this package were common. I'd still go with mylar.
Yes, 100K means 100nF . . . in this case.
#3 is confusing now that I have a closer look. My guess is the #3 pre-dates the others by 10-20 years, judging by the older style package. 100K was a common way of specifying 100nF back about 20-30 years ago.

100pF would either be marked 100 or 100p.

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Wow, and to think I bought these last year!
Do capacitors lose their functionality as time goes by, or are they just as reliable?

Thanks to both of you, you saved me from a lot of confusion. :)

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Maybe someone is still using older manufacturing technology and they are only a few years old!

Everything degrades with time, however mylar film or polycarbonate caps would possibly be good after 50-100 years, especially sitting in your junk box.

Electrolytic caps are a different story.

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And sometimes a LC-meter (Nards ELMCIE) comes
handy when you have doubts.

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Could also be epoxy-dipped ceramic. Those are still widely (ok maybe not so widely since SMD broke free) manufactured.

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Here an example of a multilayer ceramic, epoxy dipped. Size 22x14x3mm.

Nard

Attachment(s): 

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tricia, and Ulyana. You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips