Can an ATmega32 do this?

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Hi guys,

I'm bowing to your greater knowledge...

Can you tell me if the ATmega32 chip running at 16MHz is capable of driving a servo, operating a shutter on a camera, chosing the mode on a camera opearating 2 relays and monitoring 3 temperature sensors and one barometer all in the same piece of code?

The temp sensors only need to be read every 60 seconds the servo needs to move 3 times every 5 minutes to position the camera an then operate the shutter. The relays need to be triggered every 10 minutes to power cycle the camera and the gps/gsm tracker.

Does this sound feasable or impossible, my lack of knowledge is going to be the biggest test of all.

Any response greatfully received!

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Yes. And it could probably do it at 100kHz too.

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It would be a "Walk In The Park !" And, you'd have time to take a smoke break and drink a couple cups of coffee, too!

In fact, you probably need to think up several hard things for the Mega32 to do, just so you can use a higher percentage of the wasted processing power.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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Thanks for that guys.

I'm sure I'll be back here before my projects complete. I'm sending a balloon to the stratosphere to take some pictures and I need to get the ATmega32 busy by the look of it.

Thanks again

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How big is the battery? Whats the power budget for the project?

Imagecraft compiler user

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Hello rharrison1971,

High altitude civilian GPS may be a bit of an issue. Have you alreaady selected your GPS unit, and verified that it will meet your intended altitude requirements?

JC

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I would make provision for cooking facilities too so that breakfast would be hot first thing in the morning. :?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Since you are sending this device so high, John S's mention of 'cooking' is not too far off. I don't know if the avr could handle the temperatures. Are you designing something to keep the avr in temp. spec.?

Jim

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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I'm doing the same thing. I've reflashed my USGlobalSat GPS to allow it to go over 24km so we will see how that goes. I'm excited to test the final board at the office in a thermal chamber that can go to -60C. Fixing a problem that gets revealed there will be much cheaper than losing the payload! :)

How will you keep in touch with the payload to recover it. Packet radio? GSM/SMS?

Math is cool.
jevinskie.com

Last Edited: Thu. Jul 24, 2008 - 07:51 AM
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jgmdesign wrote:
Since you are sending this device so high, John S's mention of 'cooking' is not too far off. I don't know if the avr could handle the temperatures. Are you designing something to keep the avr in temp. spec.?

Jim


Most payloads are sent up in an insulated and padded compartment. I read one such project where the temperature in the compartment didn't go much below the ground temperature from supposedly just the insulation. I wonder how much effect solar heating had or whether he was running a Pentium 4 in there to keep the temps up! :?

Math is cool.
jevinskie.com

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Wow. Nice project. I'm impressed.
Sometimes I would like to shoot my digicam to the stratosphere or maybe better shoot it to the moon so it will never come back to me.
But anyway. This sounds like an awesome project to me.

If you send all that equipment to stratosphere, think about software reliability and a good watchdog. Nothing is worse than a software crash when your device is far away from you.
http://www.embedded.com/story/OE...

regards,
Baldrian

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Wow,

Now that's a lot more interest than I was expecting.

If you guys have any more ideas then send them on.

Here is the URL for the project

http://www.robertharrison.org/ic...

The flight box / pay load will be enclosed in 30mm expanded pollystyrene and will be more or less sealed from the elements. There will be a small anount of heat generated by the enclosed electronics and there are temp sensors to monitor intenal and external temperatures. Will test in a cold store (-30C) or better.

The information about the GPS devices not working above 20+K is very useful I'll make sure I research it
carefully.
Thanks

Robert

Last Edited: Sat. Jul 26, 2008 - 10:52 AM
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My impression from reading about other similar projects are, that making all the hardware work is a piece of cake compared to solving the problem with the camera lens fogging up (!).

/Jesper
http://www.yampp.com
The quick black AVR jumped over the lazy PIC.
What boots up, must come down.

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ATmega32 + 16 MHz clock = much more fun.

but you need to well define the context of your software first in order to ease the way for yourself and state whether you will need RTOS or not.

Regards,
--A.El-Saeed

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can we interface gsm mobile with atmega32 to send sms?

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Quote:
ATmega32 + 16 MHz clock = much more fun.
ATmega324p + 20 MHz clock + lower power etc. = MUCH MUCH much more fun.:)

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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shakirmes wrote:
can we interface gsm mobile with atmega32 to send sms?

Yes, there are many examples on the internet about using AT commands over a UART to send SMS. I've head that the cell service only works fairly close to the ground so beware.

Math is cool.
jevinskie.com