What do you think about this online course?

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What do you think about?

http://www.deccancode.com/embedded%20C%20With%20AVR%20Atmega32.asp

it's 99$, included dev-board: http://www.deccancode.com/AVR-LiP-Flyer.pdf

a 2cd course.

Do you suggest it?

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The bundled hardware is worth quite a few dollars. Most people probably spend at least another 50 dollars on books.

So if you are keen and have not already invested in hardware, books etc you cannot go wrong.

If you have some experience then the value all depends on the quality of the teaching material. Good luck, and please report on how you get on. You will probably make a lot of Indian friends.

If you have fellow students with identical hardware and course projects then you will all help each other. The biggest difficulty with this forum is to coax any information from a query. If only you knew which compiler/version/chip/speed/library/wiring was involved.

David.

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David,

Quote:
The biggest difficulty with this forum is to coax any information from a query. If only you knew which compiler/version/chip/speed/library/wiring was involved.

Which forum are you referring to?
And
Are you pointing to the compiler, version, chip of the hardware provided along with the course?

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No. Most messages posted on AvrFreaks ask about problems to which they give insufficient information.

It is very difficult to answer questions when you have to guess about the hardware or software.

This course would be VERY helpful to its students because they would all have the same system. I think that it sounds an excellent arrangement. The other advantage could be in the shear numbers of international students.

David.

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Quote:
This course would be VERY helpful to its students because they would all have the same system.

Thats true. During learning, it is preferred to have a pack instead of bits-n-pieces.

And I found many students start with buying a low cost experiment board, later they find that the board has no microcontroller on board, so they buy a controller, later a need of ISP programmer is fulfilled with additional purchase, still students find no way out to start learning as they don't have sample codes books and tutorial to explain them thus spend more money on buying a book and at the end of it they spend more than require.

Instead this course by http://www.deccancode.com/embedded%20C%20With%20AVR%20Atmega32.asp
has all in one pack from softwares to hardware, from computer based tutorial to online technical support.
A good deal for students at $99

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Some preview of the course, for free, anyway, would be useful to help in the choice.

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Tutorial preview posted for the course

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I have no first hand experience with that course. But from the website it worries me that it is claimed it will make you an Embedded Engineer and get you a job in that area.

I have dealt with outsourcing to India. And when it came to quality it was usually not pretty. I do believe that such a course could land one a job as an embedded engineer in some outsourcing company, as these companies seem to hire everyone with a pulse (and I am not even sure about the pulse thing). I don't believe it makes you into an embedded engineer. In particular not someone who should let be loose on a real-world project.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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Arnold,

I am sure that everything in life has a price.

Someone interested in AVRs could:

1. buy books at random, self study at random, choose hardware at random. Pay $99 very easily.

2. enrol in a real life university. Probably cost a lot more than $99 even without living expenses.

3. enrol in commercial training courses. Pay $1000s

4. an Indian $99 online course will be far better than (1) and depending on circumstances is better value than (2) and (3).

A student is only as good as the work she has done. Her training should focus her studies. An employer will only know her value when she starts employment.

An online course will survive on its industry reputation.

David.

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david.prentice wrote:
An online course will survive on its industry reputation.

I disagree, an online course, or any other couurse, will survive on it's marketing.

Most people that go for these types of courses have very little knowledge of the industry, and thus would have no information about the reputation of the course, unless they go looking for it, and there are plenty of "suckers" that won't look. I'm not saying all of these types of courses are bad, but there are more than a fair share of them that are.

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.

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david.prentice wrote:
I am sure that everything in life has a price.
David,

I am not talking about the price (which seems very reasonable). I am talking about a promise the advertising contains, but the course can't fulfill. At least not when applying a reasonable definition of what an embedded engineer should be capable of.

The course contents descriptions looks OK for an introduction course. But I really don't see how completing that course, and doing a final project can be enough to "succeed as an Embedded Engineer".

My complaint would be the same if the course was for free or ten times more expensive.

I do believe that completing the course can improve your chance of landing a job in India. That is more an issue I have with the hiring policy of Indian outsourcing companies than with the course contents.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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Has anyone listened to the sample content posted? It is a PowerPoint slide which sounds like the Microsoft Text to Speech engine narrating it. It is very hard to listen to and understand as the words are at a very constant monotone sound. The concept of the course is ok. But if the CD's use a speech engine, it would be very difficult IMO to use in real-life.

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jbtech wrote:
Has anyone listened to the sample content posted?
Yes, it is fun, isn't it :-)

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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I have ordered the course couple weeks ago. Still waiting on shipment. I will provide updates as soon as I get it.

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I have the same questions posted on a thread in the off topic section of this site called "OPINIONS"

I have been using assembler for 20+ years, and am finally accepting that I need to learn 'c'.

This is the kit I am looking at, but posted asking for opinions.

Check the off topic where my post is, you will get some good advice there too.

I am going to probably purchase the kit anyway though.

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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I agree with ArnoldB and glitch in that just couple of courses does not make an engineer in any field. It takes a school to grow into the trade, but with some experience on HW/SW this kind of course may give a jump start. I, myself, am a SW engineer, and I mostly have been working with embedded (RT) systems (10+ years of experience) with very little edjucation on embedded systems. I had courses on processors, programming and digital electronics. I am basically just a SW engineer capable of reading datasheets.

Debugging is for sissies and delivery for surgeons. Real men do demonstration.

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Turbo,
I agree with you, Arnoldb, and glitch. But if you look at my thread on this device I am looking to learn a programming language that I can work on during my commuter train ride, which is two hours+ each way. Plus, since I can do this on my own time and for a reasonable($99.00) is fine with me.

In no way would I consider this package a true course, but if I learn something valuable in it. Worth the money.

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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You ought to get one of those arduino things with a usb. You could sit on the train with your laptop, edit, compile, download and run right to the avr thru the usb. It has lights and switches and a/ds and stuff on it.

Imagecraft compiler user

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bobgardner wrote:
You could sit on the train with your laptop, edit, compile, download and run right to the avr thru the usb. It has lights and switches and a/ds and stuff on it.

...and in the UK receive a flying visit from a MI-5 based SWAT team who would consider you to be up to no good at all.

Mind you, the withering glances of your fellow commuters would be enough to put you off before they ever arrived

:wink:

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MartinM57 wrote:
bobgardner wrote:
You could sit on the train with your laptop, edit, compile, download and run right to the avr thru the usb. It has lights and switches and a/ds and stuff on it.

...and in the UK receive a flying visit from a MI-5 based SWAT team who would consider you to be up to no good at all.

Mind you, the withering glances of your fellow commuters would be enough to put you off before they ever arrived

:wink:


Yes, if it had blinking LEDs, you would find yourself dead rather quickly from 7 gunshots to the head. :roll:

Math is cool.
jevinskie.com

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i would suggest buying a board and trying your hands on it than books...
besides the tutorial are good a use learn as you do more than the books :wink:

change without any change is no change ;-)

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I don't suffer from that problem as I am actively working for the railroad that I commute on and they know me well :mrgreen:

What intrigues me on this is that the 'course' starts at the very beginning and supposedly explains the dopey things like why VOID is not VOID etc.

The kit for $99.00 is not a bad deal or us 'c' dummies

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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You Americans lead a charmed life.

If the director of the English Underground Railway flashed a few LEDs he could have his head blown off. Especially if he had got a suntan on his holidays.

David.

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I think everyone needs to take a chill pill

My mindframe is done. I am going to purchase the kitI posted.

I am not worried about the rail police since I workk as a contractor for them and they know me well.

Thanks for all the information

To everyone though,
Keep your paranoid thoughts about the MI5,CIA and any other shit to yourselves. This site is not dedicated to terrorism, nor am I.

Once and for all,

Knock the shit off

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:
Turbo,
I agree with you, Arnoldb, and glitch. But if you look at my thread on this device I am looking to learn a programming language that I can work on during my commuter train ride, which is two hours+ each way. Plus, since I can do this on my own time and for a reasonable($99.00) is fine with me.

In no way would I consider this package a true course, but if I learn something valuable in it. Worth the money.

Jim

Like I said, it is probably no good for getting into embedded business, but it might give a good start for learning. It is more fun to try things out than to just imagine doing something.

Also I tried to point out that to get into the embedded world, you do not need any "embedded"-courses. Just attitude to learn and tools to try out ideas.

For learning C I would rather suggest that you try console applications using GNU toolchain on PC/laptop. It is easier to get the first programs running, and the library support is far better - there is a lot more memory in a PC/laptop so that you don´t need to worry if libraries fit in.

You can start with PC/laptop programming even if you had the course stuff ready for the next step. Anyway, to learn about embedded SW you need a way to try things out.

Debugging is for sissies and delivery for surgeons. Real men do demonstration.

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Turbo,
Good advice. I will look into it. Nice to see something relevant as opposed to the crap I ranted about in my last post. I still, have made up my mind and am purchasing the kit. One poster noted that if it was not worth anything, then why is it on the opening page of the freaks website? Advertising dollars maybe, but I do wonder how many opinions will change if I write a glowing review of the kit when I am done?

Oh well, back to work.
Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Hi,

I just received this dev-board today. Arrived in about 5 days. I'm still waiting for my usb to serial converter, so I cannot do anything now. If anyone interested I posted some pictures. I will update with my impressions on learning software. As I am totally new to AVR.

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jgmdesign wrote:
I think everyone needs to take a chill pill

My mindframe is done. I am going to purchase the kitI posted.

I am not worried about the rail police since I workk as a contractor for them and they know me well.

Thanks for all the information

To everyone though,
Keep your paranoid thoughts about the MI5,CIA and any other shit to yourselves. This site is not dedicated to terrorism, nor am I.

Once and for all,

Knock the shit off

Jim

I think it's you that needs the pill my friend.

I'm perfectly chilled....

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Hello again!

So I got the usb to com adapter, and can confirm that this device works with generic usb-->serial converter from ebay. So that's a good thing.

but no really good thing i could say about the course itself.

First of all, YOU __WILL GET__ CHARGED A DUTTY FEE for the package. So be warned. Mine came couple weeks after I actually have received the package.

The slides, are narrated by generic windows robot-like sounding voice. And this is not advertised in the web site anywhere (or at least I did not found it). In some cases it's hard to understand what it is saying, as the slides do not come with transcripts. It makes things worse for me, as English is not my native language.
Secondly, the example source codes course comes with are really poor. For me, as I know very little C++ programming, is very hard to get around them, and understand it.
Speaking about example source code there are simple too little of it. There is no simple 'hello world' or 'flash the LED' source code whatsoever.

The material in slide is not bad. It tells a bit about programming in C and and about the development kit. But sometimes I would wish some things were explained more in detail.

In general I would say this is a very average course. It is still not expensive, and you get technical support (which I did not tried yet) over website forums and email.

So this is only my opinion. Would be interesting to her from anyone else to who bought this kit.

Thanks!