What are the AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128 ??

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gchapman wrote:

Revision History | AVR® Low-Power Techniques

D

01/2022

...

  • Added a new section on Voltage Regulator Configuration for DA and DB devices

...

 

edit :

AN2515 AVR Low-power Techniques | Application Note | Microchip Technology

 

 

Section 8 BOD is interesting. The app note suggests turning off BOD when the MCU is sleeping. It has a sampled mode which I used on the XMEGA series in sleep mode as it is pretty good on power consumption, but they recommend turning it off entirely.

 

I'm not convinced that the MCU will be able to wake up if you do that. I think it could latch up during sleep if there are power issues.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Thanks

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Feb 24, 2022 - 12:59 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I have to say, I really like having the examples documentation and code published on github...

 

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I like the ASCII art on the project smiley

 

********************************************************************************************************
*        MMMMMMMMMNddhysyyyysyyhdmMMNNNMMMMM                                                           *
*        MMMMMMmhssssssssssssssssshMNmmMMMMM                                                           *
*        MMMMdyssssssssssssssssssssyNMMMMMMM                                                           *
*        MMmyssssso-`.ossssssso-.-osymMMMMMM                                                           *
*        Mdssssss/`   `/sssss:    `+ssdMMMMM       __  __ _                     _     _                *
*        mssssss/       -sss-       /ssyNMMM      |  \/  (_)                   | |   (_)               *
*        yssssoso-       .oso.       -ssymMM      | \  / |_  ___ _ __ ___   ___| |__  _ _ __           *
*        ysso- -ss/`      `/ss-       .ossdM      | |\/| | |/ __| '__/ _ \ / __| '_ \| | '_ \          *
*        ys+`   .os+`       :ss/`      `/ssh      | |  | | | (__| | | (_) | (__| | | | | |_) |         *
*        y:      `+so-       .os+`       :sh      |_|  |_|_|\___|_|  \___/ \___|_| |_|_| .__/          *
*        m`      -osss/       -sso-       /M                                           | |             *
*        Mh`   `/ssssss+`    :sssss/     -NM                                           |_|             *
*        MMm: -osssssssso-`.+sssssss+`  +NMM                                                           *
*        MMMMhysssssssssssssssssssssso+mMMMM                                                           *
*        MMMMMMNdysssssssssssssssssydNMMMMMM                                                           *
*        MMMMMMMMMNmdhyyysssyyhhdmMMMMMMMMMM                                                           *
********************************************************************************************************

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I've been reviewing the DA series as they seem to be still made whereas it looks like Microchip isn't in a rush to replenish the global stock of Megas.

 

Looking at the Errata document, I'm shocked how many mistakes there are on the silicon, some without any workarounds. Something that stands out to me is the flash endurance. The datasheet rates the flash endurance at 10,000 cycles, consistent with older Mega's and most microcontrollers. In the datasheet errata, page 14, it states that the flash write endurance is only 1000 cycles.I know it's unlikely that it will limit most users, as flash will only get erased/written a handful of time in production scenarios, but it does make me wonder what they did wrong with the silicon design that led to a huge de-rating. In the past I have taken advantage of the faster speed of flash vs. eeprom to store non-volatile data, but I'm not sure that would be possible with the DA series.

 

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trevorg wrote:
... whereas it looks like Microchip isn't in a rush to replenish the global stock of Megas.
The order backlog is impressive at distributors including microchipDIRECT but can't work the orders until there are lead frames.

Automotive manufacturers may have first cut which preloads the megaAVR wafer fabs (IIRC, Colorado Springs, Tempe Arizona, and Gresham Oregon); distributors are either secondary or tertiary.

Some megaAVR are wafer fab by SMIC and likely packaged relatively nearby so those may have greater availability.

trevorg wrote:
... but it does make me wonder what they did wrong with the silicon design that led to a huge de-rating.
AVR Dx is likely a new wafer fab process for the ones in the Microchip Technology 8-bit MCU design group (core voltage regulator, wide voltage, increased SOA, IDK where AVR Dx is wafer fab though first guess is TSMC)

Some AVR Dx characterization may have completed; characterization takes time due to sampling a significant number of wafers and batches and operating an environmental chamber(s)

 


Lead Time | World's Largest Inventory of Microchip Products

ATMEL parts are running out of stock due to wafer shortage ? | AVR Freaks

How to search for Microchip PCNs (SMIC, '12 and earlier)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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trevorg wrote:

I've been reviewing the DA series as they seem to be still made whereas it looks like Microchip isn't in a rush to replenish the global stock of Megas.

 

Looking at the Errata document, I'm shocked how many mistakes there are on the silicon, some without any workarounds. Something that stands out to me is the flash endurance. The datasheet rates the flash endurance at 10,000 cycles, consistent with older Mega's and most microcontrollers. In the datasheet errata, page 14, it states that the flash write endurance is only 1000 cycles.I know it's unlikely that it will limit most users, as flash will only get erased/written a handful of time in production scenarios, but it does make me wonder what they did wrong with the silicon design that led to a huge de-rating. In the past I have taken advantage of the faster speed of flash vs. eeprom to store non-volatile data, but I'm not sure that would be possible with the DA series.

 

 

My possibly flawed understanding is that the DB series are basically the DA with the bugs fixed, so if you are developing anything new try to use a DB. If it's old try to port to a DB.

 

They did the same thing with the XMEGA, the original A1 chips were pretty buggy and quickly replaced by the A1U parts.

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You might be onto something Mojo, the DB series is remarkably similar. There are a few bugs still present in the errata, but the flash endurance is back to 10,000. I'm annoyed the Microchip haven't updated the datasheet for the DA series and put the discrepancy in the errata. It makes me think that they intentionally don't want to advertise the poor flash endurance in the datasheet. A few years ago I found an error in a datasheet for a ATTiny that caused me to swap the SDA and SCL lines on a board that I had made, they were happy to correct the datasheet for that so it's not hard to do.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 25, 2022 - 03:32 AM
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You've got to be kidding me! angry

I literally just designed the symbol in Altium.

 

Why aren't they updating the datasheet!!??

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trevorg wrote:

You've got to be kidding me! 

I literally just designed the symbol in Altium.

 

Why aren't they updating the datasheet!!??

 

Which bits of the errata affect the pin-out? And what of the errors is going to cause you issues? 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-ac-mplabx: This repository contains 3 bare-metal code examples that show how to use the AC peripheral of the AVR64DD32 device in different modes.

 

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-adc-mplabx: Code examples for using the ADC peripheral.

 

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-bod-mplabx: Code examples for the BOD peripheral.

 

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-ccl-mplabx: This repository contains 3 bare-metal code examples that show how to use the CCL peripheral of the AVR64DD32 device in different modes.

 

<placeholder for CPU>

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-cpu-mplabx: This project demonstrates the interrupt handling features of the AVR® CPU.

 

edit :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-dac-mplabx: Code example for the DAC peripheral.

 

edit2 :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-rtc-mplabx: Code examples for the RTC peripheral.

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-tca-mplabx: Code examples for using Timer/Counter Type A (TCA)

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-tcb-mplabx: Code examples for the TCB peripheral.

 

edit3 :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-mvio-mplabx: Code examples for using the MVIO pins.

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-tcd-mplabx: Code example for the TCD peripheral

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-wdt-mplabx: Code example for the Watch Dog Timer peripheral.

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-zcd-mplabx: Code examples for the ZCD peripheral.

 

edit4 : TWI

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-i2c-mplabx: Code examples for the I2C peripheral,

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-i2c-mplabx-mcc: Getting Started with Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C) Using the AVR64DD32 Microcontroller with MCC Melody

 

edit5 :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-gpio-mplabx: Guide for using the GPIO of the AVR64DD32 Microcontroller

 

edit6 :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-spi-mplabx: Guide for using SPI for the AVR64DD32 Microcontroller

 

edit7 :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-ac-mplabx-mcc: Getting started with AC and MCC for AVR64DD32

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-spi-mplabx-mcc: Getting Started with SPI on AVR64DD32 using MCC Melody

 

edit8 :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-adc-mplabx-mcc: Getting Started with ADC on AVR64DD32 using MCC Melody
GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-bod-mplabx-mcc: Getting Started with BOD on AVR64DD32 using MCC Melody

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-ccl-mplabx-mcc: Getting Started with CCL on AVR64DD32 using MCC Melody

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-cpu-mplabx-mcc: Getting Started with CPU on AVR64DD32 using MCC Melody

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-usart-mplabx: Guide for using USART on the AVR64DD32 Microcontroller

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-usart-mplabx-mcc: Getting Started with USART on AVR64DD32 using MCC Melody

 

edit9 :

GitHub - microchip-pic-avr-examples/avr64dd32-getting-started-with-tca-mplabx-mcc: Guide for using TCA for the AVR64DD32 microcontroller.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. May 10, 2022 - 02:50 AM
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Rev. B - 04/2022 | AVR® DD Family [AVR64DD32, AVR64DD28]

...

  • Update Connection for UPDI Programming section

Connection for UPDI Programming | AVR® DD Family

[second paragraph[

The recommended UPDI connection has changed since its first introduction. For this reason, both connections are described below, with the initial UPDI connection layout named UPDI Connection v1 while the new UPDI connection layout is named UPDI Connection v2. The difference between the two connections is the inclusion of a RESET signal in the connection for v2.

UPDI connection v2 for MPLAB PICkit 4.

 

edit :

AVR64DD28/328 Preliminary Data Sheet (PDF)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Apr 22, 2022 - 01:56 AM
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gchapman wrote:

edit :

AVR64DD28/328 Preliminary Data Sheet (PDF)

 

 

Same wrong SPI-IF "is cleared by hardware when executing the corresponding interrupt vector"

description like in all other Series 0/1/2 controller data sheets frown

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AVR DD released.

PIC® and AVR® Microcontrollers Anchor the Majority of Embedded Designs Today | Microchip Technology

Microchip grows its commitment to the 8-bit PIC and AVR MCUs by releasing five new product families and over 60 new devices

Chandler, Arizona

April 28, 2022

[end of fourth paragraph]

For example, a WS2812 LED array, which requires unique timing to be driven correctly, can be controlled easily by configuring a super peripheral consisting of a Pulse-Width Modulator (PWM), an SPI interface, and the Configurable Logic Cell (CLC).

 

[end of sixth paragraph]

“We have also built a robust supply chain for 8-bit PIC and AVR MCUs­, the vast majority of which are manufactured in Microchip-owned facilities. This allows us to control the production process in ways that are not common in the industry.” [Greg Robinson, vice president of marketing for Microchip’s 8-bit MCU business unit]

 

Development Tools

[Melody]

 

Availability

All five product families are currently sampling or in production. For more information click here. To purchase, contact a Microchip sales representative, authorized worldwide distributor or Microchip’s Purchasing and Client Services website, www.microchipDIRECT.com.

 

...

Come Join Us (MPLAB Now Supports AVRs) | Page 8 | AVR Freaks (Melody)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. May 6, 2022 - 02:39 AM
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Processing Analog Sensor Data with Digital Filtering

  • median
  • IIR
  • FFT
  • Kalman

GitHub URL currently generates a 404.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
AVR DD released.

 

Is this more vaporware like the AVR-EA series?

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No answer

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. May 24, 2022 - 01:58 AM
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I'll just copy the signature bytes for the DD series here for reference, so I can find them easily in the future.

Since some AVR-DD are finally in production, it's time to update jtag2updi to support these chips.

 

AVR16DD32 0x1E 0x94 0x31
AVR16DD28 0x1E 0x94 0x32
AVR32DD32 0x1E 0x95 0x38
AVR32DD28 0x1E 0x95 0x39
AVR64DD32 0x1E 0x96 0x1A
AVR64DD28 0x1E 0x96 0x1B

 

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Is there a Microchip news ticker somewhere for new data sheet releases? Or are they accidental finds?

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

RSS

 

Thanks. Good service yes

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Jun 2, 2022 - 03:04 AM
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MCU Forecasts (If You Believe Them) | The Embedded Muse 447 by Jack Ganssle

[end of last paragraph]

Another graph in Jacob's article shows lowly 8-bit MCUs still hugely successful, despite so many analysts having condemned them to the scrap heap for so long. Cheap processing has driven this industry since its earliest days; 8 bits are cheap; and I expect that force will continue to open new and unexpected markets for computing of all sorts.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
8 bits are cheap

 

Above all, 8 bits are:

Much simpler and at the same time sufficient for so many things. Why should this change in the next 100 years?

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Jack Ganssle wrote:
8 bits are cheap
8-bit MCU are inexpensive (a reply by a pedanticsmiley

GermanFranz wrote:
Much simpler and at the same time sufficient for so many things.
Concur

GermanFranz wrote:
Why should this change in the next 100 years?

  • wafer fab EOL (die respin has a price and cost though the ones at Microchip Technology can acquire reconditioned wafer fabs)
  • improvements in wafer fab processes (relatively large geometries are currently a match to requirements for high temperature and radiation tolerance)
  • RISC-V (its ecosystem growth)
  • memory-safe computer languages

8-bit MCU may fill a current 4-bit MCU niche (watches are first to mind)

 


Exchange - RISC-V International

Memory safe computer languages | AVR Freaks

Electronic Systems | Brands & Companies - Swatch Group (EM Microelectronic)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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64 KB AVR DD, some in stock, as low as 1.3USD each for 100, remainder arriving early July'22

AVR DD MCUs - Microchip Technology | Mouser

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
RISC-V (its ecosystem growth)

 

Well, I don't see any major competition in RISC-V and its devices.  Hardly more menacing than ARM.

 

gchapman wrote:
memory-safe computer languages

 

So I would say rather fundamentally simpler programming. So simple that the hardware no longer plays a role in the thinking effort.

 

gchapman wrote:
64 KB AVR DD

 

The raison d'être of the new DD devices hasn't really opened up to me yet...

 

Last Edited: Sat. Jun 11, 2022 - 10:30 AM
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GermanFranz wrote:
The raison d'être of the new DD devices hasn't really opened up to me yet...
Reduced pin count (eventually)

AVR® DD | Microchip Technology

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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GermanFranz wrote:

The raison d'être of the new DD devices hasn't really opened up to me yet...

 

My take...

 

the AVR range has felt to me to be a bit fragmented. You'd have, at most, maybe 3 similar devices in a group, with varying memory sizes. Compare this to PICs where you'd have the same basic device available in 4 or 5 package sizes with 4 or 5 memory sizes.

 

This has changed with the Dx series.

 

We already have the DA, and DB series in almost full production. The DD is starting to come online, we can assume that there will be a DC range, and for smaller devices (tiny?) we have the EA range. Need more flash? Just move up a memory size. More pins? Pick a bigger package. The same underlying features will still be there.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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AVR-da/db seems aimed at the ATmega space (28 pins is the low end.)   AVR-dd seems aimed at ATtiny (32 pins is the high end.)

(and OMG the overlapping package sizes seem to have compatible pin-outs!  What is the world coming to?)

 

 

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Hard/Software solutions that already exist in abundance.

It would have been interesting to be able to use this network capability simply in assembler. The knowledge required for this is still much more extensive than it could be- - and probably also the implementation.

Last Edited: Tue. Jun 21, 2022 - 06:43 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Correction of two minor defects.

Revision 6 | AVR-IoT Cellular Mini Hardware User Guide

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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press release

New 8-bit MCU Development Board Connects to 5G LTE-M Narrowband-IoT Networks | Microchip Technology

The AVR-IoT Cellular Mini Development Board is the latest to join Microchip’s AVR® family, providing developers an easy blueprint for building IoT devices

Chandler, Arizona, June 21, 2022

[end of first paragraph]

... Microchip Technology Inc. (Nasdaq: MCHP) today announces the AVR-IoT Cellular Mini Development Board based on the AVR128DB48 8-bit microcontroller (MCU). This solution provides a robust platform to start building sensor and actuator nodes on 5G narrowband IoT networks.

[end of third paragraph]

The ATECC608 device can easily be configured to most major cloud service providers through Microchip’s IoT Provisioning Tool.

[end of sixth paragraph]

Microchip partnered with Sequans to include its Monarch 2 GM02S single-chip radio equipped with 5G LTE-M and narrowband IoT. Microchip also partnered with Truphone to provide the SIM card for cellular service that offers reliable coverage worldwide.

[end of ninth paragraph]

It is also Arduino®-compatible and is supported by Microchip’s Github Library which provides functionality for HTTPS, MQ Telemetry Transport (MQTT), low power and more.   

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Thank you for the nice example gchapman, maybe someone will find it useful.

 

I only program in assembler- because the 8Bit AVRs make it relatively easy too.

I can therefore do very little with high-level language examples including obscurely imported functionalities.

Conversely, if I were to program in high-level language, there would be no reason to limit myself to AVRs.

Then it would be better to use a powerful 32Bit controller right away.

Let's start with practical use: Data is to be exchanged between two distant wireless circuit boards.

All I want its important to know is: Where is the data to be copied to, where to get the data,

what is the security key if necessary, and how are the cellular modules to be configured? 

It could be so damn easy.

 

As it is such modules are useless for me and I prefer to use other wireless options plus existing,

permanently installed internet connection, even if that may be more cumbersome overall.

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 22, 2022 - 09:40 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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