O/T your language of 'origin'?

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Sean,

So (with my Sherlock Holmes hat on) I guess that makes you 41-42 ?

Cliff

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Hey, Sean! Nice to se you de-lurk!

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I wasn't alive for most of these =]

Here's my path starting around 99'

Perl
C
C++
Java
PHP
Obj-C
C#

These days I generally use C/Java/PHP for most things. At this point, aside from assembly it's become more of a syntactical nuisance to switch/learn new languages.

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I started learning computer languages as a progression from learning analog electronics after getting a worthless college degree in Economics. I learned op amps, then digital logic, then Bill Gate's BASIC on a Radio Shack Color Computer.
A gut feeling that there had to be a better way of doing programming led to reading about 6809 assembler. The more 'advanced' Commodore computers led to 6502 assembler, with a very brief exploration into FORTH I remember going to Toys-R-US to buy the FORTH cartridge for the VIC-20 and being amazed that the only place that one could get an advanced programming language for a home computer was at a toy store.
Abandoned the Commodore 64 for a PC in 1989 and learned Intel 8051 assembler. Attempted to learn 8080 but the bizarre kluge of the segment/offset addressing scheme for that processor led me to Turbo C instead for MS-DOS programs. Abandoned programming for eight years in the 1990s.
Briefly learned AVRs when they came out in 1998. Having Flash memory and peripherals on chip meant never again using ultraviolet EPROMs and wire-wrapping a hundred connections between the CPU chip, the memory chips, the peripherals, and the TTL glue logic. Happy days had come finally.
Learned Visual BASIC for a job connecting air quality monitors with embedded systems to Windows PCs. Introduced to object-oriented programming in order to customise Microsoft Word and Excel applications to work directly with data received from embedded systems using VBA (Visual Basic for Applications, a strange and fascinating language-very far from BASIC)
Relearned AVR assembler in 2003 to develop flexibility in using inexpensive microcontrollers to replace TTL clusters and to do things that weren't possible before. Studied PICs and wish that I could convince all the PIC users to switch to AVR.
Currently studing embedded-systems C for the AVR by rewriting my assembler code into WINAVR C.
Hope to be fluent and flexible in C by the time that 8-bit controllers like AVRs are replaced by 32-bit controllers like ARM.
Some day I might even be able to get a job in this field, but I'm beginning to doubt it. I always seem to be five years behind the level where people are hiring. Advice and suggestions requested and warmly received.

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Quote:
A gut feeling that there had to be a better way of doing programming led to reading about 6809 assembler. The more 'advanced' Commodore computers led to 6502 assembler,

6502 "more advanced" than 6809? I don't think so! The 6809 was the perfect 8 bit processor.
8080 segment/offset? I think alpha-particles(now whatever happened to them?) have affected your memory!

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Simonetta wrote:
Attempted to learn 8080 but the bizarre kluge of the segment/offset addressing scheme for that processor...
Surely the 8086. The 8080 had no segment/offset addressing.
Simonetta wrote:
Some day I might even be able to get a job in this field, but I'm beginning to doubt it. I always seem to be five years behind the level where people are hiring. Advice and suggestions requested and warmly received.
Put your experience on the resume and concentrate on embedded. Embedded experience seems to be strongly desired in the marketplace right now, if the calls I get from headhunters are any clue.

Although your experience is "light" (I wouldn't put it that way :wink: ), don't be afraid to put "hobby" experience down on your resume -- some "hobbyists" I know are far better at this than I am!

Good luck!

Stu

Engineering seems to boil down to: Cheap. Fast. Good. Choose two. Sometimes choose only one.

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Just a side note: I had been always fascinated by the Transputer technology, but never met anybody that worked with it... It's nice to know that someone had already used them.

Simonetta, although I'm an ARM fan as I'am an AVR fan, I seriously doubt that 8 bit microcontrollers would be replaced by ARM's or similar in a near future, only the 'big ones', like ATmega256 or similar.

Anyway, I also would recommend you to check Cypress PSoC. I'm pretty convinced that this 'fresh air' in the microcontroller market would have some future. And they also are programmed in C. But it seems that the 8 bitties ones will still be something like a PIC core, while I'm awaiting for the new ones, probably ARM-CortexM3 based cores.

Ah, and the 'hobbyst' side of me was what let me switch from a SAT to R+D job.

Guillem.
"Common sense is the least common of the senses" Anonymous.

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Oh hell, why not......

BASIC (1979)
Assembler for 80c51 (1987)
Ladder logic for Modicon PLC's(1990)
ladder logic for Omron PLC's(1991)
Ladder logic for Allen-Bradley PLC's(1991)
Ladder logic for GE/FANUC PLC's(1992)
Assembler for Microchip PIC (1995)
ISP Synario for Lattice semiconductor CPLD's(1998)
Assembler for Atmel AVR's(2004)
WinCUPL for Atmel CPLD's(2006)

Whew!!

What was the original question? :mrgreen:

Jim

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John_A_Brown wrote:
Quote:
A gut feeling that there had to be a better way of doing programming led to reading about 6809 assembler. The more 'advanced' Commodore computers led to 6502 assembler,

6502 "more advanced" than 6809? I don't think so! The 6809 was the perfect 8 bit processor.
8080 segment/offset? I think alpha-particles(now whatever happened to them?) have affected your memory!
I think he meant that the Commodore was more advanced than the CoCo (at least that's what I hope he meant). I'm pretty sure he confused the 8080 with the 8088 which many PC clones used at the time. I hated the 8088 memory arch. too. I hated doing C on the 8088/86 also, nasty far and near pointers would drive me mad.

My favorite assembly language was 6809, I learned that before C and I thought C looked a lot like it.

Neil Cherry
Linux Home Automation
Author: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies.

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