The reasons of ARMs controller.

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Hai All

 

Liitle consider that ARM type Controllers will be the next projects,Cause some reason about voltages and I/O capabilities.

There's numberous type of ARMs.

I'm very pleasant with SAM types,STM32 types,Nuvoton,NXP,Renesas types or probably ARM clone types made in China.

 

To made finished products something like picture below for beyond projects.

NextConsole

 

Any info for ARM kits type will be welcome.

 

Many Thank's

 

 

www.tokopedia.com/madagang .Buy and Donated cheap electronics and manuscripts.

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I have no idea what you are asking here. Are you simply looking for Cortex dev boards? Obviously this is a Microchip site so one would probably be moved to recommend:

 

https://www.microchip.com/en-us/...

 

But the range of ARM devices is immense from 8pin DIP Cortex M0 up to 300+ BGA packaged Cortex A application processors. So you first need to identify the level of project you want to use an ARM in. If you are talking about "equivalent to 8bit AVR" then perhaps start at the Cortex M0/M0+ end of things ? That would be "SAM-D" products in the Microchip world:

 

https://www.microchip.com/en-us/...

 

Specifically something like this $21 board that includes a debugger might be a good "entry level":

 

https://www.microchip.com/en-us/...

 

or perhaps look at "Arduino Due" which uses a Microchip SAM3.

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Thank's Cliff for Info's inclueded the prices

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ST also has a nice collection of affordable dev boards. Just go to your favorite distributor and search for "STM32 Nucleo".

 

edit: whoa, stocks really are running low...

Last Edited: Mon. Mar 28, 2022 - 12:34 PM
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Thank's El Tangas for info

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I find ARM very complex, I wish microchip had microcontrollers which are classic AVR8 but made faster. Retaining the original architecture.

“Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you're as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?” - Brian W. Kernighan
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Last Edited: Mon. Mar 28, 2022 - 12:44 PM
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Heisen wrote:
I wish microchip had microcontrollers which are classic AVR8 but made faster. Retaining the original architecture.

 

I'd like multi-core AVR, I think that would be useful for real time applications. And this reminded me of the Raspberry Pi Pico, which is a dual core cortex-M0.

The RP Pico is actually the only raspberry product still in stock at my local distributor. I think I'll go there and buy a couple :)

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Heisen wrote:
I wish microchip had microcontrollers which are classic AVR8 but made faster.

 

So far, all my projects have been fast enough in assembler.  It often needs 4 MHz at most.

 

Instead, I would urgently wish for a more intelligent architecture. Easily adjustable clock, easier to use usart/spi/i2c interfaces, wireless interfaces, universal equivalent registers with automatic status saving in interrupts. Universally configurable equivalent pins, automatic inputs at all ADC and DAC  channels ....

 

The current ARM controllers don't do anything better here, just more complicated.

Last Edited: Mon. Mar 28, 2022 - 02:25 PM
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GermanFranz wrote:
universal equivalent registers with automatic saving in interrupts.

 

Yup an alternate register file that would be swapped automatically for interrupt routines. The Z80 had something like that (not automatic IIRC but still very useful).

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El Tangas wrote:
The Z80 had something like that

 

The Z380 was even better equipped in this respect if I remembered correctly. Crazy to shed a tear over such old chips today.

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Heisen wrote:
I find ARM very complex, I
Actually they aren't really that much more complex than AVR these days as the AVrs have been headed to meet them! Sure they are possibly more complex than the very traditional tiny/mega but all these new Xmega derived AVR have very "ARM like" peripherals.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. Sep 3, 2022 - 05:24 PM
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Yeah, I meant the traditional tiny/mega only. The simple nature is addictive.

“Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you're as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?” - Brian W. Kernighan
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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gchapman wrote:

Some consider RISC-V.

I'd stick with the ARM "herd" for the time being for more widespread knowledge and support.

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El Tangas wrote:
I'd like multi-core AVR,
Almost as rare as hen teeth.

El Tangas wrote:
I think that would be useful for real time applications.
MPCM is usually enough (in system design, create communication links by increased latency or reduced data rate)

El Tangas wrote:
The RP Pico is actually the only raspberry product still in stock at my local distributor.
The ones at Raspberry Pi made an excellent decision on wafer fab.

 


megaAVR 0-series | Page 4 | AVR Freaks

SecureAVR® are now at WISeKey.

Secure Microcontrollers - WISeKey

 

Common Functionality | USART | Migration from the megaAVR® to AVR® Dx Microcontroller Families

 

Raspberry Pi is now a microcontroller | AVR Freaks

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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easier to use usart/spi/i2c interface

They seem petty simple to use. set a few adjustment & use them.... Maybe adding arbitrary bit length selection to spi would be nice, or assign some memory to an automatic UART ring buffer. 

 

They should be able to make a 100MHz version...maybe worried about eating into other products, like PICs.

 

I wish the megas offered the PLL multiplier, rather than just the tiny's.  They could dump some prescalers & add 32bit timers​​​​​​​

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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avrcandies wrote:
set a few adjustment & use them

 

How about just setting the baud/speed rate in plain text, staging the data into a buffer, and "pressing start" in an IO register bit? How about simply finding received data in a buffer? Same principle for Uart, SPI, I2C.

So many simplifications could be made.  Instead, more and more stupid configuration/programming effort. 

This is the wrong direction of development, makes software more complex, more error-prone, less portable between such stupidly structured, different controller architectures.

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How about just setting the baud/speed rate in plain text

Not sure what that means, nothing we send to the avr is in plain text, even opcodes (ADD, BRNE), etc are not sent as plain text. 

 

Now that might be an interesting idea---the AVR could include some decoder, so we could send it plain text, but just as well to let the compiler handle the conversion.

 

Maybe you are referring to newer AVR's that have almost too many options...then it can be information overload of possible adjustments.

 

So far you have had good luck with AVR, let it continue!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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avrcandies wrote:
... assign some memory to an automatic UART ring buffer. 
DMA though typical is double buffer.

avrcandies wrote:
They should be able to make a 100MHz version...maybe worried about eating into other products, like PICs.
100 MHz is the realm of dsPIC33C.

CMOS power dissipation is proportional to frequency and the square of the voltage (AVR Dx, coin cell instead of battery)

avrcandies wrote:
I wish the megas offered the PLL multiplier, rather than just the tiny's.
megaAVR follow-on AVR Dx has a PLL.

 


AN8046 AVR1304: Using the XMEGA DMA Controller | Application Note | Microchip Technology

[PDF, top of page 8]

3.1 Double buffering

 

Design Code Separately and Integrate Seamlessly with Dual-core dsPIC Digital Signal Controller | Microchip Technology

dsPIC33CH128MP508 | EEMBC Benchmark Score Viewer

 

Clock Sources | Migration from the megaAVR® to AVR® Dx Microcontroller Families (PLL in next to last paragraph)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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megaAVR follow-on AVR Dx has a PLL.

 

THANKS!  I will keep that thought, since I often need the higher freq.   It has been a while since I did a search, sadly they don't tally that feature

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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GermanFranz wrote:
wireless interfaces,
Wireless is difficult to compete in though LoRa has significant future growth.

 

https://www.mouser.com/c/semiconductors/wireless-rf-integrated-circuits/rf-system-on-a-chip-soc/?q=%22RISC-V%22 (RISC-V, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5)

conversely

https://www.microchip.com/en-us/product/pic32mz1025w104132#buy-from-store

via

PIC32MZ-W1 Wi-Fi® SoC and Module Family | Microchip Technology

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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avrcandies wrote:

 

megaAVR follow-on AVR Dx has a PLL.

 

THANKS!  I will keep that thought, since I often need the higher freq.   It has been a while since I did a search, sadly they don't tally that feature

 

Yeah... but the only peripheral that is connected to the PLL is the type D timer, you can't clock anything else from the PLL, including the CPU.

And the type D timer is the most complex peripheral I've ever seen on an AVR, it takes quite a while to figure out.

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I'd like multi-core AVR

I'd like AVR......if I could get any....crying

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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js wrote:
I'd like AVR......if I could get any....crying

 

Yeah... it's getting hard. There are still some AVR-Dx around, at least there were some last time I checked.

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Yeah... but the only peripheral that is connected to the PLL is the type D timer, you can't clock anything else from the PLL, including the CPU.

And the type D timer is the most complex peripheral I've ever seen on an AVR, it takes quite a while to figure out.

I haven't looked into the timer D, but as long as it can gen PWM, I'd happy.  I always wished the '328 had PLL. Because of the PWM fine time slicing, a fast clock is often needed to gen a speedy PWM. 

Strange, in the other AVRs let the PLL connect to more than one timer (I think).

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Somewhat concur as the RISC-V ecosystem is growing.

 

GitHub - espressif/arduino-esp32: Arduino core for the ESP32

Been stated that ESP32-C3 is the follow-on to ESP8266.

A comparison of ESP32-S3, ESP32-C3 and ESP8266 modules (Sponsored) - CNX Software

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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At least one AVRxm in yesterday's microchipDIRECT lead time report is heading in the right direction (37 weeks instead of 52)

AVRe+, and such, logjam should break sometime this year.

Maybe similar for most AVRxt though some (most?) AVR Dx have the lesser lead time.

 

https://www.microchipdirect.com/product/ATXMEGA128A1U-ANR

Lead Time | World's Largest Inventory of Microchip Products

 

edit : that specific XMEGA is back to 52 weeks

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Apr 1, 2022 - 06:27 PM
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avrcandies wrote:
... the other AVRs let the PLL connect to more than one timer (I think).
Indeed

Atmel AVR XMEGA D Manual

[page 57]

Figure 6-1. The Clock System, Clock Sources, and Clock Distribution

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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ATXMEGA32E5-AN  

Out of Stock - Arriving Soon

 

Additional Stock Arriving. Order Now to Secure

2,750 can ship on 19-Jan-2023

 

Lead Time For Additional Quantities

Additional quantities can ship by 04-Apr-2023

So SOON for MC is at least 9 months! One can make a human in the same time......

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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js wrote:
One can make a human in the same time......
laugh

yet the first three months of one's life after birth is a fight for life.

Said that our gestation is really twelve months ... kinda like some projects ... 9 months to get the parts then 3 months of all-nighterssmiley

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Additional quantities can ship by 04-Apr-2023

 

I keep getting excited, then notice the wrong year!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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avrcandies wrote:
They should be able to make a 100MHz version...maybe worried about eating into other products, like PICs.
yes

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I think if I was starting out to use ARM I would be very tempted to look at Raspberry Pico RP2040. They manufactured tons of stock "up front" so there do not seem to be supply problems like other silicon right now.

 

Your $4 buys you a board with a DUAL-core 133MHZ ARM on it:

 

 

among other things they have these intriguing (9 opcode) sub-processors on board ("PIO") that can be programmed to do pretty much any kind of common "bit shifting" IO operation (like I2C, SPI, I2S and even things like VGA and HDMI signaling!). One key thing is the quality of the supplied libraries and especially the class leading documentation:

 

https://www.raspberrypi.com/prod...

https://projects.raspberrypi.org...

https://www.raspberrypi.com/docu...

 

The two CPUs can be overclocked to 300-400MHz for the more "demanding" project ;-)

 

I've had a couple of exchanges with Eben Upton on Twitter (man behind "Raspberry") and he seems a thoroughly pleasant kind of guy.

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Ok,I’m looking the big parts here..

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Jeckson wrote:
the big parts here..
Do you mean Cortex A ?

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clawson wrote:

Jeckson wrote:
the big parts here..
Do you mean Cortex A ?

 

Thank you very much for info

What I meant small parts are ARM32 micro's such as:STM Discovery,STM32 Nucleus,STM32 Black pills and Blue Pills,Nuvoton kits,wch-ch32v2(X)03 kits,(SAM32/PIC32) kits,NXP Arm32 kits and Raspberry Pico.

Meanwhile the big parts:

For WS-2B A200 are:Very expensive...above >>100US$ uhh

 

Pipes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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re Arm Cortex-M and Cortex-A, the ones at Emcraft Systems create SoM that run Linux in addition to some RTOS; an RTOS may be a match to your requirements (IIRC in post #1)

Jeckson wrote:
wch-ch32v2(X)03 kits,
In addition to WCH for RISC-V is Allwinner.

Jeckson wrote:
(SAM32/PIC32) kits,
PIC32MZ DA are somewhat inexpensive with zero price RTOS though am unaware of third party kits whereas SAMA5 does (Linux and RTOS)

PIC32 can run BSD variants.

 


Linux and System-On-Modules: i.MX RT1050, STM32F7, SmartFusion2, i.MX 8M, i.MX 6ULL, i.MX 6SoloX (Emcraft Systems)

 

Sipeed LicheeRV Nezha CM C906 RISC V Core Board Supports Linux WAFT|Demo Board| - AliExpress

 

PIC32MZ DA | Microchip Technology

What screen resolution does the PIC32MZ DA support? (Microchip Technology Technical Support)

HUGE Memory MCU | AVR Freaks

threadx/LICENSED-HARDWARE.txt at master · azure-rtos/threadx · GitHub

guix/LICENSED-HARDWARE.txt at master · azure-rtos/guix · GitHub

Giant Board | Crowd Supply (SAMA5D2)

Giant Board - Crowd Supply | Mouser

Home · sergev/LiteBSD Wiki · GitHub (PIC32MZ)

RetroBSD · GitHub (PIC32MX)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Yeah, ARM is great, I just love it when my posts disappear because someone smelt something ARMish about them. 

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Fianawarrior wrote:

Yeah, ARM is great, I just love it when my posts disappear because someone smelt something ARMish about them. 

posts about ARM do NOT "disappear". They get moved to the ARM section of this message board. 

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clawson wrote:

Fianawarrior wrote:

Yeah, ARM is great, I just love it when my posts disappear because someone smelt something ARMish about them. 

posts about ARM do NOT "disappear". They get moved to the ARM section of this message board. 

 

I know, but no one goes there.  It's very lonely in that community.

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but no one goes there.  It's very lonely in that community.

I go there!  It's better attended the the ARM Forums at ARM :-(
But yeah, I think The Industry in general lacks an appreciation of the value of "community support", where "community" means includes a large number of people asking "stupid" questions that in fact lots of people need/want to know the answers too...

 

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Raspberry Pico had 2/4/8/16 MB versions yes

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avrcandies wrote:
Not sure what that means, nothing we send to the avr is in plain text, even opcodes (ADD, BRNE), etc are not sent as plain text. 

 

I meant clear, concrete information: How many MHz, how many bauds...  No cryptic parameters that only arise after studying the data sheet.  Sensor data could also be output in the same way.  For example, temperatures in °C and not first calculated in a cumbersome way using any calibration data.

 

gchapman wrote:

Wireless is difficult to compete in though LoRa has significant future growth.

 

Not over long distances, but for example as a low-performance I2C replacement.

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ST derivatives also cheap and Raspberry Pico seems rationally in experiments.

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Jeckson wrote:
ST derivatives also cheap

 

There are several companies that make "STM32 compatible chips", they are somewhat cheaper but I don't think it's such a big difference. Probably not big enough to risk using a clone with is less known and less supported.

 

Here is an article about them:

https://hackaday.com/2020/10/22/stm32-clones-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly/

 

However, in this era of shortage, having several drop-in replacements to choose might be a good thing (?) if they really do behave the same, or close enough for a given application.

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A recent thread on Twitter:

 

 

The point being that RP2040 is apparently about 10 times cheaper than any near competitor.

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yes remind us when over clocked the PCs and added Aluminum plates.

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Video about overlocking RP2040 from 133MHz to 420MHz...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...

 

 

Apparently you use the ability to access flash around the 300MHz mark.

Last Edited: Tue. Apr 5, 2022 - 01:43 PM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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clawson wrote:
Apparently you use the ability to access flash around the 300MHz mark.

 

'Use' or 'lose'?

 

Neil

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yes,No SWD but Nano could handle.
barnacle wrote:

clawson wrote:
Apparently you use the ability to access flash around the 300MHz mark.

 

'Use' or 'lose'?

 

Neil

No respons from Cliff lately.

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barnacle wrote:

clawson wrote:
Apparently you use the ability to access flash around the 300MHz mark.

 

'Use' or 'lose'?

 

Neil

it was a typo. Should say "lose". Beyond that speed you can only execute out of RAM

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I believe the days of ARM products coming from China is numbered.   They are likely investing in RISC-V.

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MattRW wrote:
They are likely investing in RISC-V.

 

If you had Litography machine then you could built your own RISC-V.

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GigaDevice Arm Cortex-M4 giveaway :

Freebies and Discounts | The Embedded Muse 453 by Jack Ganssle

 


GD32 ARM Cortex-M4 Microcontrollers (GigaDevice)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller