Atmel JTAGICE MKII Power question

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I've got a (real) Atmel JTAGICE MKII and I don't have any details on the power. I have a 5v board (running a Mega128) and I'v like to know if I can power it off the 5v PS I'm running (750 ma).

I've already got the board running with the ISP but I'd really like to take advantage of it under Linux (I think I have all the tools).

Thanks

Neil Cherry
Linux Home Automation
Author: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies.

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THe JTAG MK2 draws power from the USB port ( so not more than 500mA )

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It's all in the AVRstudio JTAGICE MKII manual under help.

External power supply DC range 9 to 15 Volts DC
External power supply AC range 9 to 9 Volts AC

If the JTAGICE MKII is powered from the USB only, it's required that the USB can deliver minimum 500 ma (self powered hub).

The older manual used to warn that if a low power USB hub was the only power source during a JTAGICE MKII firmware upgrade that the upgrade could fail. Now it appears to have changed to simply requiring a 500 ma self powered USB hub. The target being emulated cannot provide power to the JTAGICE MKII through the JTAG cable.

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Don't forget always to follow the steps:

1. connect the MK2 pins to the test circuit
2. power the MK2
3. power the test circuit.

The MK2 green led must be ON

Good Luck

Michael.

User of:
IAR Embedded Workbench C/C++ Compiler
Altium Designer

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Mike B wrote:
It's all in the AVRstudio JTAGICE MKII manual under help.

External power supply DC range 9 to 15 Volts DC
External power supply AC range 9 to 9 Volts AC

If the JTAGICE MKII is powered from the USB only, it's required that the USB can deliver minimum 500 ma (self powered hub).


Thanks, that explains why I can't find it (I'm running Linux not Windows)! I do a search via Google but found nothing useful. I just tried the MKII with the USB on my Linux laptop and it is recognized.

Thank!

Neil Cherry
Linux Home Automation
Author: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies.

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One more reason why PDF help files would be nice.

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You could try using wine for AVRstudio.

My primary OS is Linux, but my pair of PC computers are dual boot Win2k SP4 and Linux. I disable all network interfaces in any Windows OS because they have repeatedly proven to be so vulnerable when exposed to any network connections. Because I have no Win2k network connection and only use Win2k for AVRstudio plus a shrinking number of legacy applications, I don't bother trying to keep up with any MS updates. Linux has a new ntfs-3g file system interface that improves its ability to interface with the MS ntfs partition format (if you are willing to trust it, it is supposed to be able to write ntfs files without corrupting the file system). You can create a fat32 drive partition in order to have a common file system that both Linux and MS will recognize and be able to write to. I just keep my AVRstudio projects, ATMEL data sheets and AVRstudio download updates in a fat32.

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Mike B wrote:
You could try using wine for AVRstudio.

My primary OS is Linux, but my pair of PC computers are dual boot Win2k SP4 and Linux. I disable all network interfaces in any Windows OS because they have repeatedly proven to be so vulnerable when exposed to any network connections.


???
No offense but I have no need of AVR Studio. I dislike IDE products. If I want to use one touch compiling I can program the keys in emacs. I really prefer to use emacs, shell and make with my tools. My favorite editor has been emacs since 1978. I love the side by side editing (or top/bottom or a mix there of). I have the key strokes memorized and I haven't found a decent IDE that uses the same keystrokes. Some have come close but never the same.

Maybe I'm missing something. What does AVR Studio buy me that I don't already have?

Neil Cherry
Linux Home Automation
Author: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies.

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ncherry wrote:
Maybe I'm missing something. What does AVR Studio buy me that I don't already have?

The CHM help files and programming hardware updates, both of which can usually be fished out of the mix.

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The_village_idiot wrote:
ncherry wrote:
Maybe I'm missing something. What does AVR Studio buy me that I don't already have?

The CHM help files and programming hardware updates, both of which can usually be fished out of the mix.


Well, that makes me look stupid! :oops: I've just downloaded AVR Studio and I'll set it up under Wine. (or I'll boot to Windows and install it). I can then upgrade the MKII to the latest firmware.

I've got tools to read the chm files under Linux.

Thanks

Neil Cherry
Linux Home Automation
Author: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies.

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ncherry wrote:
Maybe I'm missing something. What does AVR Studio buy me that I don't already have?

Studio contains an decent AVR Simulator/Debugger too (required for the ISP/Dragon debugging capability).

Studio doesn't work out of the box in Wine at this time. We need someone with some Wine skills to get it to work first.

Markus

Markus

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markus_b wrote:
ncherry wrote:
Maybe I'm missing something. What does AVR Studio buy me that I don't already have?

Studio contains an decent AVR Simulator/Debugger too (required for the ISP/Dragon debugging capability).

Studio doesn't work out of the box in Wine at this time. We need someone with some Wine skills to get it to work first.


Lesson learned, looks like I need to install it under Windows.

BTW, the ISP is available under Linux as well as the debug using the MKII and gdb. If I can find the correct Insight I'll able to debug with that under Linux. I'm just trying too remember if it was Insight that I liked to work with or not.

Thanks.

Neil Cherry
Linux Home Automation
Author: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies.