become a pro in embedded systems for just $6

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Claims this website: https://boingboing.net/2021/12/0...

 

I have no experience with this site, found it in the latest "The Embedded Muse" #436

 

 

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

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There are two basic approaches to education:

 

The first is the traditional way.  The student enrolls in a school, buys the recommended textbook, and attends sessions with other students where a teacher talks for an hour or more several times a week about the current subject in the textbook.  The teacher will occasionally ask the students whether they understand what he is talking about.  At best, the students learn most of what the teacher wants them to learn.   Students pay money to the school: school gives some money to the teachers.

 

The other way is when a student wants to know a lot about specific subject, quickly.  He goes to where people who know this subject hang out and says, "this is how (the topic that he wishes to learn about) works...", and then he explains how he thinks that it might work.  The other people laugh in amazement at his stupidity.  So he say's "I'll buy coffee, donuts, or burgers for the person who can show me why what I said isn't right".  Then for the price of a donut, he learns all that he wants to/needs to know about a specific topic about previously, he knew nothing.  Cheaper than school tuition, but everyone believes that he is a true idiot.

 

Becoming a pro in embedded systems for $6 is possible, but you got to be willing to go the second approach to education.  And don't give your $6 to the guys who promise to sell you a learning package.  Instead spend it on getting a Node32 module from eBay and the cable that lets it plug into your PC's USB slot.   Then download all the Arduino IDE and json package for the ESP32/Node32 device that you spent $6 on from eBay.  Then watch all the YouTube videos about connecting and testing it.  Then all the intro, hobbyist, and tutorial webpages about loading and running demo programs.  Then start on the background studies:  learn WiFi web/internet interfacing and protocols, learn SD cards and disk storage interfacing and programming.   At the same time, start a collection of sensors and their libraries.  Study the library software for various complex devices like TFT displays and GPS modules.

 

   More than any other profession, there is real disagreement about what a "pro" is in electronics, especially microcontroller programming.   Is is anyone who gets paid and does anything remotely related to the field like adding a blinking LED to indicate power, or is a 'pro' the old seasoned lab guy who eats data books for breakfast, and dreams in code languages that you've never heard of, and thinks that you're an idiot?

 

 

Last Edited: Mon. Dec 20, 2021 - 06:35 PM
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Yahh, and then you stand there with all the knowledge and skills, but no diploma, and noone will believe you amount to anything (because noone == HR; and they dont understand shit)

 

:)

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The embedded-systems industry is one of the few in the world where it is possible to bypass the HR departments of the corporate world through your knowledge and skills.

 

The reason that you deal with HR is to get employment into a corporation so that you can have the money needed to live in these modern times.  The HR will hire you if the amount of money that you bring into the corporation though your work is more than they pay you (and all the government programs that they must contribute into when they hire you).   If you can use your embedded-systems skills to solve the problems that the people who are hiring the HR's corporation to solve, and if you can do it cheaper than the corporation is charging them, then you can get the money that you need from them directly.  

 

  Embedded-systems consultancies and companies have huge overheads and have to charge a lot for their services.   Say a customer will pay $10,000 for a network of IoT that will monitor plant growth in a remote field.    If you know the new IoT module boards as a result of having bought a few $10 development boards on eBay and got them connected to the Internet using Arduino example code and YouTube videos, then you can bid $5000 for the project because you know which inexpensive parts to buy on eBay and how to program them all together to fit the customer's exact specifications.   You can make a living/survive doing this even though the HR department that you used to want to work for won't give you the time of day because you don't have a degree from a very expensive school.

Last Edited: Thu. Jan 6, 2022 - 09:19 PM
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Simonetta wrote:
then you can bid $5000 for the project because you know which inexpensive parts to buy on eBay and how to program them all together to fit the customer's exact specifications.   You can make a living/survive doing this even though the HR department that you used to want to work for won't give you the time of day because you don't have a degree from a very expensive school.

since your "working from home" now, unless HR had you sign an exclusive contract with them, your free to pursue this while still employed, i.e. multiple streams of income!   wink

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

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Ok, all fine. So you suppose one could run a chance of income trickle then.... :)

 

Can you also attract/ find customers that are not all that bothered about coding following latest coding practices and standards ? 

Just fairly well structured code, fairly self explicative, complex avoiding code.

 

And how do you find them ?

 

(btw I have a tendency to try to find ref.man where possible (and readable) not Ytub :) )

 

 

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Yes, there are customers that are not particularly concerned about the internals of the code - but will want to see that you have understand and have experience in working successfully on projects.

 

I doubt they'd be impressed if you tell them you just did a $6 internet "course" from somewhere called "Boing Boing".

 

 

But why would you not want to be following current  coding practices and standards ... ?

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Not following, well, dont know, since I dont spend time studying them. Im not so much for learning form, than understanding and solving.  Guess I find it a waist of time. Also I have seen some large overbuilt, to me, rubbish, whence I have tried to look (eg. itil....)  :)