Anybody know where "command.h" is?

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Long story short, AVR068 refers to a file called "command.h" which "can be downloaded from the Atmel web site".  It is supposed to have all of the command codes and responses for the STK500 command set.  Does anybody have this file, or know where I can get it?  I need it (or at least the codes) because I'm going to implement the command set myself, and the aforementioned apnote doesn't list anything.  It only calls the signals by their symbolic names, I need the hexcodes.

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Last Edited: Thu. Nov 18, 2021 - 10:41 AM
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There's a copy in with the STK500v2 Arduino Bootloader:  https://github.com/arduino/Ardui...

 

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Well that was fast, thanks a ton!

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Welcome to AVRFreaks

googling "STK500 command set command.h" finds a few; eg,

 

https://github.com/dhylands/projects/blob/master/host/boothost/stk500-command.h

 

Would be good to raise a ticket with Microchip so they're aware of this ...

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Hmm, I tried searching for similar things, nothing came up.  I've always had bad luck with using search engines lol.

 

Also thanks for the welcome!

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when looking specifically for code, a search directly on GitHub is often a good start ...

Top Tips:

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I realise you have your file now but another way to get it is to take a step back in time.

 

At the Internet Archive you can take a look back at how www.atmel.com used to be. If I navigate (back in 2016) to a page such as "atmega16" and then "documents" I get to:

 

https://web.archive.org/web/2016...

 

That has:

 

 

The icon on the left accesses the PDF you already have, the icon on the right has a ZIP for the code (I'll attach it to this post).

 

What it contains is:

 

 

You can probably use this same technique to get the code for any "old" application note now that microchip.com seem to have chosen to keep all the PDF and hide all the ZIP!

Attachment(s): 

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Or from the horse's mouth so to speak: https://www.microchip.com/conten...

via https://www.microchip.com/en-us/...

 

Found using a popular search engine.  I often struggle to locate information using Microchip's website itself.