Newbie questions about AP7000/AP7001

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#1
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Just a quick question, I have the STK500 and the older ISP programmers for AVR8 bit controllers, and I have seen many plans for DIY programmers...

Is there any similar inexpensive methods for a some playing around with them as a hobby to program the AVR32 line of chips, either an updated firmware or build it yourself programmer able to write to the new chips?

thanks

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Nope, raw programming of the chips can only be done at this stage with an Atmel JTAGICEmkII. But, if you're going to be using a bootloader for your app - and that bootloader never becomes corrupted - you can use it to program any other part of the chip.

See, for example, https://www.avrfreaks.net/wiki/in...

There are people around saying you get get a JTAGICEmkII from digikey for $150 atm, it comes bundled with an STK500, you could have 2! Yay for redundant dev gear ;)

-S.

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Is that a limitation of the design of the CPU? or of current programming accessories?

Without stepping on anyones toes, is there a possibility of a clone of the mkII jtagice? or something like the Usbprog with the mkII firmware loaded being able to work on these new chips?

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The chip's only programming interface is JTAG, that is indeed a limitation of the chip, though not a huge one for the most part.

The fact that the JTAGICEmkII is the only adaptor which works at this stage is simply because no-one else has made a mkii compatible adaptor AFAIK. There should be no reason other companies can't make a mkii clone like all the mki clones there are out there. Unless Atmel have done something tricky and legal with the mkii they didn't do with the mki.

I think the main limitation is that the mki protocol could be implemented on a single atmega16 and that was it. The mkii has 2x atmega128s and a bunch of FIFO ram etc etc. It's more complex, more expensive and at this stage the only thing you can do with it you can't do with a mki is program AVR32s. For the most part it isn't (at least wasn't) worth the time of a 3rd party to make a clone.

Hopefully that will now change.

-S.

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Note that the actual JTAG protocol (i.e. the protocol between the mkII and the target chip) is not the same on AVR32 and regular AVRs. The spec isn't public, but you can try asking Atmel if they will give it to you. Also, the Nexus standard as well as the OCD chapter in the AVR32 AP technical reference might give you a few hints.

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EDIT: Nice to see that now Atmel gives all information - thanks.

---
Really bad that specs for JTAG of AVR32 is not public :-( Shame on Atmel.

It's very important to have Open and cheap/community supported, developments tools like USBprog.

JPCasainho,
www.Casainho.net
.Portugal

Last Edited: Wed. Dec 26, 2007 - 11:32 AM
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AFAIK the part of the JTAG spec you need is in the latest datasheet for AP7000.

Hans-Christian

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Yeah, the spec actually went public at some point after I wrote that. The AP7000 data sheet contains most of the information you need to write a programmer or debugger. The AVR32 AP Technical reference (also public) contains the Nexus register definitions.