TONE control with AVR/8051 without I2C

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Yo! AVR freaks.

 

I am looking for a schematics to attach a tone control IC to your AVR/8051

 

Like this, they advised on another forum:

 

https://320volt.com/en/lm1036-at...

 

But only i can not find the according schematic on the website.

 

Does anybody have a alternative schematic to attach a tone control IC on your ATMEL MCU ?

PS: I can not use I2C, its taking to much time already

 

so it must be control voltage or PWM

 

This is mainly what i am looking for.

 

To place the TLV271 between the MCU and the tone IC, is also fine.

 

Greets, Wouter van Wegen

 

Last Edited: Thu. Feb 4, 2021 - 08:28 PM
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that 'other forum' wrote:
lm1036 

Which Google says is,  "a DC controlled tone (bass/treble), volume and balance circuit for stereo applications in car radio, TV and audio systems. An additional control input allows loud- ness compensation to be simply effected"

 

Plenty of datasheet & other links: https://www.google.com/search?q=lm1036

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Last Edited: Thu. Feb 4, 2021 - 03:34 PM
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Note Rhom makes some low-cost  serial quad DACs that might send a voltage to your tone contoller chip....Of course, pwm is fine too, though you prob want to heavily filter out any ripple......the DAC might be faster if you are in a hurry & less fuss.   AVR also has some devices with DACs built in.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Are you asking us if we know of any inexpensive available ICs that accept digital input to change the tone filter response of a stereo audio signal?

I don't know of any, but there must be some that are used by the millions of audio playback devices out there.  Most likely these ICs would be proprietary to the big companies that make home audio equipment.

 

The LM1036 is about 30 years old and it is a fully analog chip.  It uses four potentiometers to control the tone/balance/volume of the stereo audio.  The high voltage on these pots is +5.4V from an on-board Zener diode.  You could probably use four DACs with a +5V_ground range to create the voltages that would be coming from these pots.   Using a straight PWM signal might either drive the LM1036 into oscillation, or it might have an audible 9KHz tone because 9KHz is about the frequency used by Arduino for PWM generation.

 

I suspect that modern MP3 players would turn the MP3 data into raw audio DAC data and then apply digital-signal-processing algorithms to simulate tone-controls before sending the modified audio digital data to the left and right output DACs and amplifiers. 

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Simonetta wrote:
The LM1036 is about 30 years old

looking at the scope screen photos, I think the article must be pretty old, too!

 

Indeed, modern applications would probably just do it all digitally.

Top Tips:

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  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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