Why are Japanese versions of the AVR datasheets so 可愛い?

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#1
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Sometimes, while googling for AVR stuff, I come around the Japanese versions of AVR datasheets (and other documents). They are always much cuter than the English version.

Why is that? I like their version best...

 

Just an example:

Vs

 

Last Edited: Fri. Dec 18, 2020 - 01:39 PM
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You mean all those little colourful houses, sky hooks, TV antennas etc?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Yeah, I mean everything is so colorful, while "our" version is so dull...

 

Are these documents official?

https://avr.jp/

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Also the pages load fast from that avr.jp site. I can't read it, but I like it, is MC the ones doing that, if it is someones pet project... I don't know what to think.

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I opened one at random and translated the red box on the first page and got:

 

Please note that this document was created by volunteers for the convenience of the general public and has nothing to do with Atmel. Please note the contents in [Introduction] of the bookmark.

 

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So they recreated all those documents from scratch! That's crazy and impressive at the same time.

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I had an Introduction to Japanese class long ago at a local college. 

 

I am intrigued at the Japanese characters (kanji) in the message header box.

I tried click-and-drag on these chars using Firefox browser, but this did not work.

If it had worked (if it had copied the numeric representation of those chars into a buffer), then I would have pasted the chars into the Google Translate window.

I googled "do Japanese chars kanji with mouse" and arrived at https://kanji . sljfaq . org  .  Here I drew each of the three chars into the box with the mouse.

 

A selection of completed kanji appears. I clicked on the correct one, and was taken to Jim Breen's WWWJDIC site.  The first char identifies there as Unicode:53e5 (Japanese: "phrase, clause, passage") with five strokes.  The second char is more complex at 13 strokes, and comes in as Unicode:611b (Japanese:"love, affection, favorite").  The third char is the phonetic representation for Japanese words (hirigana) for the forward vowel "i".  "...eee.." as in see, be, me...

 

How the message author got these chars into the message header, I haven't a clue.

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Simonetta wrote:

I tried click-and-drag on these chars using Firefox browser, but this did not work.

...

How the message author got these chars into the message header, I haven't a clue.

Your Firefox must be broken.

 

Attachment(s): 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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Is it okay to write Japanese here?

 

(*´·ω·) 可愛い (·ω·`*)

 

edit: (・ω・) It seems to be okay.

 

 

Last Edited: Mon. Dec 21, 2020 - 02:48 PM
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I would stick to English because of the precision of the technical terms discussed on a web site like this that is highly focused.

 

Until a few years ago, I would have said that you should use English because it's the only language that I know.   Then all the European readers would just snicker to themselves because I'm just another dumb American that only knows one language, while they learned three or four in school.  But now, through the magic of Google, (and a trillion dollars in USA government-funded research since the end of WWII),  I can copy-and-paste any weird language that you can get on the screen into Google Translate and get between a level 2 and level 3 translation into English.

 

Machine translation levels:  (each level is about an order-of-magnitude higher in computer resources)

Level 1: word for word substitution  : Unicode Western gliph recognition

level 2 :  sentence, short paragraph  : kanji optical-char recognition

level 3: full paragraph cohension   : printed Arabic (letters combined in handwriting)

level 4: conversational comprehension, common idioms   : handwritten script

level 5: literature, diplomacy, legal documents    : OCR on historical handwritings - Rosetta Stone level

 

But a "system clock" is different from a "background timer" in embedded systems, while a machine translator would not tell them apart.  Especially with non-European languages.

 

I know one phrase in the three main Asian languages (Mandarin Chinese, Korean, and Japanese).  " <this language> is difficult to master."   When you say this when people are speaking "Asian", they don't know if you know only that phrase or the whole language.  They usually switch to English at this point, or just stop talking altogether.   Silence is golden.

Last Edited: Mon. Dec 21, 2020 - 04:25 PM