AVR128 DA/DB and 4809 Microchip Curiosity Boards

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Hello,

 

Since the release of the newer AVR series Curiosity series and new chips I have been trying to find a boards package to use these with the Arduino environment as is but haven’t had any luck, I also own a few of the Nano Every boards and even they seem to have issues in Arduino. That said I am a complete new guy with programming and Studio 7 and Microchips own IDE is way too much for my brain to handle to get a feel for programming that’s why I’m looking for support packages for Arduino.

 

Does such a beast exist yet for the newer 128 DA/DB chips and the Curiosity Boards, if so can someone provide a link or other information? If you have a better idea for IDEs I’m open to that as well, I have found a couple of support packages on GitHub, but they don’t support the 128 DA/DB series fully? But do state they do not support the Curiosity Boards as of now. I have already purchased the boards and the Nano Everys so I would prefer not to buy additional boards at least till I can use the chips first.

 

My intended projects are Radio/hobby related but these newer AVRs provide more features and power than my original 328 and 1284 based boards.

 

Thanks for any help or advice,

 

jim

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IMHO, and from some experience using Spence's Arduino DxCore with AVR-DA, it comes down to why you would want to use AS7 MS7. The obvious reason reason would seem to be debugging, which is clearly not possible in the Arduino IDE.

 

The problem with the Curiosity boards has been the absence of support for the onboard nEDBG programming and debug interface. It has always been possible to burn the Arduino bootloader using UPDI and then access the chip using an external USB/serial adapter, effectively ignoring and bypassing the nEDBG interface. This is basically what I do with the 28-pin thru-hole AVR-DAs on a breadboard or with my own design boards. 

 

I note that Spence has recently updated his core to support nEDBG: https://github.com/SpenceKonde/D...

Starting in 1.3.0, DxCore includes a version of pymcuprog, written by Microchip - this adds support for two exciting new programming tools - Microchip nEDBG (used in, among other things, the Curiosity Nano boards), and Serial adapter + 4.7k resistor (like pyupdi). The construction of a low cost UPDI programmer goes from "easy and cheaper than a latte" (described above) to "truly trivial and cheaper than a cup of coffee" - simply connect the TX line of any USB-serial adapter with a 4.7k resistor (around 3.7k if it already has a 1k series resistor in series with TX; most serial adapters do) to it's RX line, and connect the RX line to the UPDI pin of the target. And power and ground, of course. Works with or without a 470 ohm protection resistor on the target board.

Once you have the Arduino bootloader installed, you can use the Arduino IDE as usual.

 

>> My intended projects are Radio/hobby related but these newer AVRs provide more features and power than my original 328 and 1284 based boards.

 

Does this imply that you design your own boards ? If so, just bring out the UPDI pin to a header, as well as one or more serial ports. Then just use an external USB/serial adapter, or put a USB/serial bridge chip on your board, e.g. CP210x.

 

Last Edited: Mon. Dec 14, 2020 - 06:22 AM
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obdevel wrote:
The problem with the Curiosity boards has been the absence of support for the onboard nEDBG programming and debug interface.
    

How so? When used with Atmel Studio 7 or MPLAB X, I get in-circuit hardware breakpoint debugging and memory views. If I need a printf() for old style debugging, I can use their Serial Monitor views.   I have several examples at https://github.com/CmdrZin/chips...   

 

 

"If you find yourself in an even battle, you didn't plan very well."
https://www.gameactive.org
https://github.com/CmdrZin

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CmdrZin wrote:

obdevel wrote:
The problem with the Curiosity boards has been the absence of support for the onboard nEDBG programming and debug interface.
    

How so? When used with Atmel Studio 7 or MPLAB X, I get in-circuit hardware breakpoint debugging and memory views. If I need a printf() for old style debugging, I can use their Serial Monitor views.   I have several examples at https://github.com/CmdrZin/chips...   

 

In the Arduino environment, which was the OP's starting point and the context of the discussion.