which avr developement board to buy

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hello I am planning to start 8 bit programming with avr.

 

which is the best development board for the beginning.

 

thanks

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What is your definition of "best"?

 

What is your programming/engineering background?

 

Your location may limit the availability of choices.

 

What language are you hoping to use? (Assembler, C, C++, Basic, etc)

 

ps. And welcome to AVRFreaks.

 

 

 

 

Ross McKenzie, Melbourne Australia

Last Edited: Mon. Jun 11, 2018 - 09:48 AM
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Atmega328p Xplained mini.
Cheap, includes debugger, compatible with Arduino.

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As Ross says, "best" is essentially meaningless.

 

But the most obvious suggestions are:

 

  1. Arduino.
     
  2. As already mentioned, an XPlained Pro, Mini or Nano
    See: https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

 

EDIT

 

Found my previous answer on this topic - with pictures!

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

December 2020 Update: Microchip Curiosity Nano boards to add to the list of ones with built-in debugger/programmer.

 

#ArduinoXPlained

 

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Last Edited: Thu. Dec 10, 2020 - 10:39 AM
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awneil wrote:
An XPlained Pro, Mini or Nano
In this day and age I wouldn't buy any of Atmel's boards that didn't also include a debugger. So if you choose an Atmel board over Arduino verify that it is also one with a debugger too.

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clawson wrote:
In this day and age I wouldn't buy any of Atmel's boards that didn't also include a debugger.

Absolutely agree!

yes

(and not just Atmel/Microchip)

 

To be clear, the XPlained Pro, Mini and Nano are the ones with the built-in debugger.

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Last Edited: Mon. Jun 11, 2018 - 10:25 AM
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awneil wrote:
clawson wrote:
In this day and age I wouldn't buy any of Atmel's boards that didn't also include a debugger.

Absolutely agree!

yes

(and not just Atmel/Microchip)

 

To be clear, the XPlained Pro, Mini and Nano are the ones with the built-in debugger.

Pardon my ignorance:

What is built in to the XPlained boards that you are calling a debugger?

My previous development board was an STK500.

Moderation in all things. -- ancient proverb

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What is built in to the XPlained boards that you are calling a debugger?

Nothing.  The Xplained Pro boards have an EDBG (Embedded Debugger) that can program and debug code.  It also includes a CDC/COM port and the DGI (Data Gateway Interface) for capturing TWI, SPI and USART traffic.  The Xplained Mini boards have an mEDBG (mini Embedded Debugger) that can program and debug code.  It only has the CDC/COM; no DGI.

 

The Xplained boards have no such capabilities, although the ones that have a separate UC3B Board Controller do provide the CDC/COM.

 

 

edit: typos.

 

Greg Muth

Portland, OR, US

Xplained/Pro/Mini Boards mostly

 

Make Xmega Great Again!

 

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 24, 2018 - 01:33 AM
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Atmega328p Xplained mini.
Cheap, includes debugger, compatible with Arduino.

+1.  yes 

Greg Muth

Portland, OR, US

Xplained/Pro/Mini Boards mostly

 

Make Xmega Great Again!

 

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To be clear, the XPlained Pro, Mini and Nano are the ones with the built-in debugger.

It wasn't clear to me.

Xplained Pro: EDBG (UC32) debugger

Xplained Mini, Xplained Nano: mEDBG (32u4) debugger

Xplained: no debugger.  (I had been unaware of suffix-less Xplained boards.  I guess they pre-date the newer boards.  The "MEGA-1284P Xplained" is particularly annoying.)

 

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Two weeks since the OP asked his question. Maybe he has found a new hobby over on knitters 'r' us...

 

Ross McKenzie, Melbourne Australia

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westfw & Greg_Muth both wrote:
Xplained: no debugger

Correct.

 

westfw wrote:
I had been unaware of suffix-less Xplained boards.  I guess they pre-date the newer boards.

Yes, they do.

 

They also have a different "standard" for the IO header connectors.

 

valusoft wrote:
Two weeks since the OP asked his question. 

Indeed.

But this does come up frequently - hopefully the distinctions have now been fully spelled out in detail to avoid any future confusion ... ?

 

#XplainedProMiniNano

 

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Last Edited: Mon. Jun 25, 2018 - 07:54 AM
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Pro? Mini? Nano? None? Doesn't seem the crazy naming scheme was Xplained all that clearly  crying

 

Atmel's ICE development tools...called Atmel ICE...creative!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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The point is that wether it's Xplained, Xplained Pro, Xplained Mini or Xplained something else forget the name. Just ask yourself "is it a chip I'm interested in developing with?" and "does the description include the word 'debugger'?". Buy anything where both answers are "yes".

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clawson wrote:
"is it a chip I'm interested in developing with?" 

Or, at least, a close relative of one you're interested in developing with.

 

Obviously, manufacturers can't produce dev boards for every single variant of every single chip that they make - so they will tend to choose one that's "representative" of a whole family.

 

Typically, they will tend to choose the "biggest" member of the family - to cover the widest number of possible users.

 

If you're interested in a "smaller" member of the family, then just bear its restrictions in mind as you use the dev board ...

 

EDT

 

* can't

 

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Last Edited: Thu. Jun 28, 2018 - 07:45 PM
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i want to buy a programmer that is also a debugger. i would like to have  CDC/COM port and the DGI  and parallel programming if it is possible to program dip chips ?   because i am new to microcontrollers and i don't have smd soldering station.

i am thinking about buying  ATSTK500 or to buy a curiosity kit .  what is best ?

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How about Atmel ICE? It's the real deal

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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simosis34 wrote:
i would like to have  CDC/COM port and the DGI
MPLAB PICkit 4, might not be simultaneous so two or an MPLAB Snap for USB CDC ACM for AVR.

simosis34 wrote:
... and parallel programming ...
that differentiates; usually unnecessary

simosis34 wrote:
i am thinking about buying  ATSTK500 ...
reduced availability and limits to megaAVR and such (no follow-on like AVR D in PDIP)

simosis34 wrote:
... or to buy a curiosity kit .
fits on a breadboard

simosis34 wrote:
what is best ?
Your preferred AVR in PDIP plus a debugger

 

P.S.

simosis34 wrote:
... and i don't have smd soldering station.
Consider that as the skill is useful; can transfer from breadboard to protoboard though straight to protoboard may be preferred.

Breadboards are well for proof-of-concept (bench test); protoboards for first prototype (enclosure)

 


Pinouts for Interfaces | MPLAB® PICkit™ 4 In-Circuit Debugger User's Guide

MPLAB Snap | Page 2 | AVR Freaks (MPLAB X)

on sale this month :
MPLAB PICkit 4 In-Circuit Debugger

somewhat inexpensive :

MPLAB Snap

MPLAB® Snap vs. MPLAB® PICkit™ 4 - Developer Help

 

https://octopart.com/search?q=ATstk500&currency=USD&specs=0&in_stock_only=1

STK500 | Microchip Technology

AVR128DB28 - 8-bit Microcontrollers

 

Solderable PCB BreadBoards | BusBoard Prototype Systems

Thru-hole PCBs for Hammond Enclosures | BusBoard Prototype Systems

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I'd start with any Arduino until it doesn't meet your project's requirements. This will ease you into coding and basic hardware use.

Then move to Atmel Studio 7 or MPLAB X and one of the Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kits like the DM320115 - ATmega4809 Curiosity Nano Evaluation kit. 
https://www.microchip.com/Develo...
Have fun.

"If you find yourself in an even battle, you didn't plan very well."
https://www.gameactive.org
https://github.com/CmdrZin

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Did you read all  the previous posts - from 2018?

simosis34 wrote:
i want to buy a programmer that is also a debugger.

As a standalone unit - Atmel-ICE

 

i would like to have  CDC/COM port and the DGI

The XPlained boards give you that

 

 

 and parallel programming if it is possible to program dip chips ?

Why not program them with the debugger/programmer?

 

   because i am new to microcontrollers and i don't have smd soldering station.

Again, see the XPlained boards - or Curiosity

 

i am thinking about buying  ATSTK500

Why?

 

Just the STK500 is the price of half a dozen XPlained or Curiosity

 

EDIT

 

and STK500 has no debugger - you'd have to buy that separately.

 

Atmel-ICE currently on offer: https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/atmel-ice-dec20

 

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Last Edited: Tue. Dec 1, 2020 - 08:34 PM
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i am newbie in this field and i want to ask what is parallel programming? . i dont know if it is better to program an avr mcu 8bit parallel and not in isp.

 

as far as atmel -ice     it looks nice .  

 

Last Edited: Wed. Dec 2, 2020 - 10:14 PM
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simosis34 wrote:
as far as atmel -ice     it looks nice .
yet minus the UART interface that's on Power Debugger

Connecting the Atmel-ICE | Atmel-ICE

CDC Interface | Power Debugger

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Why did you say you want to have it if you don't know what it is?

 

 

simosis34 wrote:
 i dont know if it is better to program an avr mcu 8bit parallel and not in isp.

ISP is far superior.

 

These days, parallele programming is really of historical interest only.

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

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Last Edited: Wed. Dec 2, 2020 - 11:11 PM
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gchapman wrote:
minus the UART interface

The current User Guide suggests that current models have it as part of the DGI ?

 

EDIT

 

https://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/Atmel-ICE_UserGuide.pdf

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Last Edited: Wed. Dec 2, 2020 - 11:15 PM
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Another answer to the duplicate question:  https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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 i want to ask what is parallel programming?

Welcome to the Forum.

 

Short answer, forget about parrallel programming!

 

AVR chips come in several "generations", and the older ones included parallel programming as an option.

To do parallel programming one could drop a PDIP chip in a ZIF socket on a Dragon or STK500 programmer to program the chip, or to reset the "fuses" if one inadvertantly messed them up.

 As mentioned above, it is a relic from the past.

 

The newer generations of chips have newer hardware programming interfaces betweent he programmer and the micro.

They can (usually) program the chip while is is still in-circuit, (not pulled from a socket on the PCB).

Some of they use dedicated programming lines, so having the chip in circuit isn't an issue at all.

 

If you use some Arduino - type boards, or Microchip development boards, to get started you will likely never need a parallel programmer.

 

JC

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Also note that on the (hopefully) very rare occasion you might actually want parallel programming it is almost always cheaper to simply throw away the AVR and write it off to experience than to actually buy a device capable of doing parallel programming which, as others have said, would involve lifting the AVR out of circuit and programming it separately which won't be possible if it's already built into (esp soldered into) an application circuit.

 

In the tutorial forum read my article about "locked out" AVR to understand the potential pitfalls and how to avoid ever needing to resort to parallel.

Last Edited: Sat. Dec 5, 2020 - 05:51 PM
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DocJC wrote:
The newer generations of chips have newer hardware programming interfaces betweent he programmer and the micro.
The NVM controller limits programming speed.

DocJC wrote:
Some of they use dedicated programming lines, so having the chip in circuit isn't an issue at all.
If programming speed is an issue, AVR distributors and PCBA manufacturers have gang programmers (off-the-shelf or ad hoc)

 


Atmel-ICE Features | Atmel-ICE

...

  • Supports UPDI baud rates from up to 750 kbit/s

...

Memory Programming Specifications | AVR® DB Family

16b / 70 μs = 230Kb/s

 

AVR8 on Microchip Direct | AVR Freaks

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller