Pinout of "new" AVR's

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Hello everybody ...

I use a STK200 board, together with Kanda's ISP2, to program the "traditional" AVR's (Mega 8515, Mega162). I saw that the "newer" AVR's are supported by the software, unfortunately the location of pins has changed, especially the power pins ... Is there a piggyback adapter for them ? Thanks for any answer !

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Quick answer is 'no' and I don't see that anyone would make one commercially.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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It's also worth noting that the newer chips use a completely different type of programmer.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Thanks for the answers.

Last Edited: Sat. Oct 10, 2020 - 06:08 AM
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lemiceterrieux wrote:
the "newer" AVR's are supported by the software

 

I am wondering what software you are referring to? The peripherals are entirely different, so your old libraries will not work on the new chips. So far, the new chips are amazing, but I am nearing a coding burnout.

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For example, the Mega168 is listed in AVRISP-U

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The new programing interface is UPDI. The programmer I am using is pyupdi.

 

https://github.com/mraardvark/pyupdi

 

My project is (probably full of errors)

 

https://github.com/epccs/MacGyver

 

pyupdi has worked from Ubuntu and an R-Pi so far, I assume it works from Windows but from AS7 you may want to use a programmer from MC.

 

I have a crazy idea that the debugger (MDB) will someday have a UART based option to UPDI; it is just a hunch.

 

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Mega168 is not really what folks talks about when they say "new" AVRs. Try Mega4809.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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lemiceterrieux wrote:

For example, the Mega168 is listed in AVRISP-U

 

But the 168 is supported on the STK200.

 

Perhaps tell us what processors you want to use it with?

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

Last Edited: Sat. Oct 10, 2020 - 06:51 AM
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I wonder how the 168 could be programmed on the STK200 ... The power pins are in other locations ! STK200 needs that the power pins are in the "corners".

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ron_sutherland wrote:
I have a crazy idea that the debugger (MDB) will someday have a UART based option to UPDI; it is just a hunch.
Please breathe while you wait wink

https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/xc8-pro-compiler#comment-2970521

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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The 168 is an ISP chip. You have an ISP programmer. I don't really see what the issue is? If it's about getting the right programming signals to the right pins just stick the chip in breadboard then run the wires from the programmer's header to the right place.

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It looks as if the STK200 had a 28-pin socket e.g. for ATmega168

 

Quite honestly,  I would just buy an Arduino Uno clone.   Do anything you want.  It does not need an external programmer.

 

I seldom get out my STK500.  Or my old Futurlec development boards.

I don't regret buying them but since Arduino clone boards have been available it seems the most convenient hardware to use.

 

If you want to try the "newer" Microchip devices,  the Curiosity Nano or the Xplained Pro boards have on-board debugger and are pretty cheap.

 

David.

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Thanks for all Your answers. I must add that I am still using a STK200 bought in ... 1999, with the parallel programming dongle (I upgraded it with the ISP2), and it had no 28 pin socket, only 8, 20 and 40 pin sockets. Fortunately all "original" Mega's are still available at my usual dealer, Reichelt of Germany ; and they don't even sell the 4809 yet (but I saw it at Mouser) ! wink

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It looks as if the 1999 vintage STK200 had DIP-8 DIP-20 and DIP-40 sockets.

But a later version STK200-P had additional DIP-28 socket.

 

When there is a major hardware change manufacturers normally change the model number.   Not just append a letter.

 

You can still use your STK200.   e.g. with ATmega164P, 324P, 644P, 1284P which are DIP-40 chips that will fit your socket.

 

You can always program DIP-28 ATmega48P, 88P, 168P, 328P chips on their pcbs.

As I wrote earlier,   Arduino clone boards are cheap.  And don't need external programmers.

 

If you want to play with hardware,  buy an XMINI or XPRO or Curiosity.

 

David.

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And man, UPDI programmers are so expensive too! I mean, I paid $250 for mine after shipping from halfway across the world...! Ah, er... that's a decimal point not a speck of dust isn't it? $2.50 shipped, huh?

 

Mmm... I guess that would explain why I have half a dozen of them in the bin with all my USBAsps, USBTinyISP's and serial adapters... (er, actually not all of them... I've got bags of serial adapters stashed in four different places depending on how much I dislike them - the answer is "enough to design my own better serial adapters", the bin just has the least disappointing ones until my new design comes in... then there will be five bags of serial adapters)

 

You can seriously make a UPDI programmer with one resistor and a serial adapter and dupont line to connect it to the thing you're programming... (I had to play with the value of the resistor a bit; if you want it to work with Arduino and AVRdude, instead of pyupdi, you need to step up to what I use - a 2.50 Arduino Nano running jtag2updi....). The 4809 didn't set the world on fire, sure (though it was a better part than the classic AVRs), but that and the tinyAVR 0/1-series were just the prototypes... Between the DA/DB-series (I've managed to lay my hands on a few DB-series parts so far, but only the crumby 28-pin ones... I want the TQFP 64's with the full 8 MVIO pins... that MVIO functionality is one of the best quality of life upgrades I've seen on a part - not like you can't wire up a level shifter, but there are all sorts of complications to that... which just vanish with MVIO... The only question is, do you run the chip at 3.3v and the MVIO pins at 5 for the 5v peripherals? Or the chip at 5v and the MVIO port at 3.3 for the low voltage accessories? I found a programmable voltage LDO - I'm gonna pair that with a AVR128DB64, so you'll be able to set the voltage of the MVIO port (you can do it live!) from software... that'll be cool, and I'll bet I could sell em for a pretty penny)... and the tinyAVR 2-series (Digikey is estimating that they'll have them in stock in early december... but 2 weeks ago they were saying thanksgiving - the 2-series, like, you compare it to the 1-series and it's like...mmmm you lose the DAC and the TCD, you get 2 more CCL LUTs and a few features... you lose the second ADC (what a wacky feature THAT was on the 1-series!), but we do get the extra 2 bits on the ADC... and what are these new features? I can't even do it justice, the datasheet for the 16k 2-series parts is out, and the ADC is just mind blowing... not looking forward to implementing the arduino wrapper for it though, heh... My prediction is they'll sell the tinyAVR 2-series for a few years, then start rolling out that sort of ADC to whatever letter of the alphabet they pick for the followon to the Dx-series - like how the tinyAVR 0/1-series had the prototype of the CCL/EVSYS system, then they did the syncrhonizing right, added the obvious missing features in the megaAVR 0-series, and that's basically what you get for CCL/EVSYS in the latest parts)... and then there's the DD series! Who ISN'T excited for those? MVIO in packages as small as 14 pins? Yes please! They also finally figured out how to get more channels into the ADC mux, so the DD-series has ADC on all pins (except MVIO pins when MVIO is enabled).... Everyone loves DDs, am I right? And for the budget conscious, there's the EA-series coming too (it looks like there's probably going to be an Ex-series with lower specs, less memory, and lower price - I think those are likely aimed at all the people currently building stuff with m8's and m88's)... Anyway... I should stop rambling and either get some sleep or continue my rampage of productivity (megaTinyCore 2.1.0, optiboot for DA/DB-series in 512b, etc... some guy was complaining about the EEPROM library or something on the DA-series... he wants it to store data or something, but avrlibc's eeprom.h doesn't know about the new nvmctrl peripheral)

 

But yeah - I think it's time to face the fact that your STK200's time in the sun ended a decade or so ago. Check out the datasheets for the DA-series, DB-series, and 2-series parts. Just lean back while you read them so you don't drool into your keyboard... You'll do a double-take when you see the prices too. I was sure Microchip was just gonna take AVR out behind the woodshed, but instead... they're doing exactly what AVR needed to stay relevant, and that Atmel couldn't or wouldn't do 

Arduino Cores: megaTinyCore - github.com/SpenceKonde/megaTinyCore (all tinyAVR 0-series and 1-series, 2-series when they finally release the damned things) and ATtinyCore - github.com/SpenceKonde/ATTinyCore (all classic ATtiny with part in family with at least 4k flash), and now, DxCore, with support for the AVR DA-series and DB-series: github.com/SpenceKonde/DxCore
I sell breakout boards for tinyAVR parts, prototyping board, and MOSFET boards in my Tindie store: tindie.com/stores/drazzy

Last Edited: Sun. Oct 11, 2020 - 12:32 PM
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DrAzzy wrote:
some guy was complaining about the EEPROM library or something on the DA-series... he wants it to store data or something, but avrlibc's eeprom.h doesn't know about the new nvmctrl peripheral)

 

That was me. And I wasn't complaining, merely requesting. I've sent you the implementation code from MPLABX MCC. If I could do it myself I would.

 

 

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Did anything about the above post sound like it was meant to be taken particularly seriously? :-P

Like, not that I don't agree with the sentiments expressed there, but I think it was a pretty conspicuously flippant post. I'd been working on optiboot chasing down 2 instruction words here, 1 instruction word there, etc, trying to make it fit in 512b for several hours at that point. 

Arduino Cores: megaTinyCore - github.com/SpenceKonde/megaTinyCore (all tinyAVR 0-series and 1-series, 2-series when they finally release the damned things) and ATtinyCore - github.com/SpenceKonde/ATTinyCore (all classic ATtiny with part in family with at least 4k flash), and now, DxCore, with support for the AVR DA-series and DB-series: github.com/SpenceKonde/DxCore
I sell breakout boards for tinyAVR parts, prototyping board, and MOSFET boards in my Tindie store: tindie.com/stores/drazzy

Last Edited: Sun. Oct 11, 2020 - 06:55 PM
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If something can be misread, it will be. And I use the same username on Github.

 

Anyways, I've sent you some working code. I can now write to my DA's EEPROM so I'm happy :)