"Generic" board with atmega2560 programming

Go To Last Post
17 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello guys,

 

Just registered here and complete newbie to everything microcontroller programming world! I have though experience with PLCs and motor controllers.

 

Let me know if this section of the forum is not suitable for what I am asking.

 

I sourced a board with an atmega2560 controller from an old 3d printer. I want to try and program it but I have no idea where to start from or if its even possible to do so.

 

I tried the arduino IDE for which I had no luck. What do you think I should go about it? Is there any software I could use to program a "generic" board?

 

Another issue is, I don't have a clue what IO is on the board. Is there any way I could copy the program of the controller and save it on my pc for further digging?

 

Thanks in advance!

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 9, 2020 - 05:26 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I guess you'll need to look if the board has a 6-pin ISP connector.  Post a good photo of the top of the board.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

sanyc wrote:
Is there any way I could copy the program of the controller and save it on my pc for further digging?

Not if the lock bits are set, no.  Post a picture of your board.

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Wow blazing fast replies...

 

The only 6 pin I can see is the circled one.

Attachment(s): 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

sanyc wrote:
Just registered here and complete newbie to everything microcontroller programming world!

I would suggest you pick up an Arduino UNO or MEGA, it is made for learning microcontrollers, and AVRs in particular.

Either of these could be used as a programmer to read/write your 3Dprinter board.

Your board would take some experience to reverse engineer to see what was there, or do you have a schematic of the board?

 

Jim

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

sanyc wrote:
complete newbie to everything microcontroller programming world!

Welcome to the world!

 

But trying to reverse-engineer an unknown board is a challenge even for experienced people - so I really wouldn't recommend it as a starting point.

 

Do you even know that the board is 100% functional ?

 

I think you'd have far greater chance of success, and far less frustration, if you were to start on a well-known and well-supported development board.

 

Arduino would be the obvious starting point, or there's the XPlained boards for "bare metal" work:

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

have you tried putting those photos into a Google image search?

 

especially if you have an make or model names to go with it.

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Guys thanks for the input.

 

To be fair I have played with arduino before just nothing major. 

 

ki0bk wrote:
Either of these could be used as a programmer to read/write your 3Dprinter board.

 

Could you elaborate on that ?

 

I even have a touch panel display for this board, maybe I could use it in the arduino uno starter kit that I have.

 

ki0bk wrote:
do you have a schematic of the board

 

No, nothing.

 

 

I found a link for the board: https://www.ebuy7.com/item/panow... Chinese is not my stregth though :)

 

 

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Look what I found!

Attachment(s): 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

awneil wrote:
Do you even know that the board is 100% functional ?

 

yes the factory software works perfectly

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

https://us.kodama3d.com/pages/do...

 

I think these are compatible firmwares I can install on the board. Some of them are open sources meaning maybe I could play with it

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0


sanyc wrote:

ki0bk wrote:

Either of these could be used as a programmer to read/write your 3Dprinter board.

 

 

Could you elaborate on that ?

There is an example sketch that turns the arduino board into an ISP programmer, see File/Examples/ArduinoISP

Google for the many examples of using this to program another AVR using an UNO/MEGA/NANO as an ISP programmer.

 

Jim

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

found some details on changing firmware

 

https://3dprinting.stackexchange...

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Yes, you certainly could reuse this board.   You would program it through J11, which appears to be the ISP jack.

 

But why?   It's a $70+ board and you could get a better (meaning you could program it directly through Arduino) board for $8: from here:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/2-5-10P...

 

And then:  you have  an 8-bit AVR-based CPU that has been tricked into believing that it is a CPU that can handle more than 64K of Flash.

 

For the same price you could buy a STM32F411CEU7 ARM Cortex-M4 core with DSP and FPU, 512 Kbytes Flash, 100 MHz CPU  with an Arduino interface that will run any code worth running at 10x the speed of the Mega2560-based unit.

 

My point is that; yes, you can "recycle" any old PCB with microcontroller on it.  But: no, in this day and age, it's not worth the time and money to do so.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

sanyc wrote:

Wow blazing fast replies...

 

The only 6 pin I can see is the circled one.

Yep, that looks like the ISP connector.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Did you try downloading Atmel studio?  It has everything needed to get programs going, since its explicit purpose is to write programs for the AVR micros.

Best of all, it is free for the taking:

 

https://www.microchip.com/mplab/...

 

Install & get your first  led blinking.

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Simonetta wrote:
you could get a better (meaning you could program it directly through Arduino) board for $8: from ...

You could get an ATmega328P XPlained Mini for that money.

 

That'd give you:

  • A full debugger
  • A fully documented & supported board
  • A board that is recognised by Atmel Studio - so you'd have ready-to-go examples

 

https://www.microchip.com/Develo...

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...