Magic Wires--don't be fooled

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I set down a magnet on my table.  When I picked it up, a bunch of jumper wires came with it...Strange, I thought.  

Turns out about half the assorted ones I had, displayed this mysterious effect....the wires even look like copper, but apparently are steel coated copper, or have ferrous deposits in the mix (maybe they just melt a bunch of different scrap metals together).

They snapped strongly to the magnet so it's more than a little iron residue.   The good jumpers weren't even slightly attracted to the magnet.  I want a refund!!  Calling China to speak with Happy Luck Treasure. 

 

I've noticed this with some resistor leads & headers, but never jumper wires.

 

The stripped wire pic has both ends cut off...so it is wire only...looks like nice shiny pure copper---not!

 

  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Interesting, I wonder what a geiger counter would read when placed near them?

 

Jim

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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I don't know about your Americon coinage.

 

But UK "copper" coins have been magnetic since decimalisation.    The old big copper pennies were made of copper.

UK "silver" coins have been made from cupro-nickel since the 1920s.

 

Yes, a lot of connectors, header strip, ... are magnetic nowadays.

Likewise resistor leads, diode leads, ...

 

This implies iron content but is probably an alloy of some description.

Presumably these alloys have acceptable corrosion resistance,  conductance, ... compared to pure copper.

 

For things like connector pins copper alloys are better than pure copper.   Traditionally many used nickel plated brass.

 

I doubt if the price of copper is significant in a leaded resistor.

But it is certainly too expensive to use in coins.

 

David.

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david.prentice wrote:
I don't know about your Americon coinage.

They started taking the silver out of US coins starting in 1965, and completely out by 1970. You could see a brass colored layer until lately, now it appears to be a much harder mix and the impressions are barely visible now.  I thought pennies were still made of copper, but picked one up off the ground the other day to find the copper plating had been rubbed off.

Wonder how long its been that way....    You can still get .999 Silver/Gold $'s, and I see Silver hit a 5 year high today in US$.   To infinity and beyond! 

 

Jim

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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david.prentice wrote:
UK "copper" coins have been magnetic since decimalisation

No - it's more recent than that.

 

Original "new" pennies were not magnetic

 

EDIT

 

1992:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_(British_decimal_coin)#Metallic_composition

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Last Edited: Mon. Jul 20, 2020 - 09:49 PM
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avrcandies wrote:
apparently are steel coated copper

You mean copper-coated steel ?

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I expect my copper wires to be copper!....gonna check out my Pomona leads next!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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It's probably copper-clad steel. It's stronger (higher tensile strength) than pure copper but has the corrosion resistance of copper.

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Are those Neodymium magnets?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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ki0bk wrote:

I thought pennies were still made of copper, but picked one up off the ground the other day to find the copper plating had been rubbed off.

Wonder how long its been that way....

 

Some 1982 pennies are copper and some are copper coated I think nickle, depending on which mint made the pennies.  After 1982 all of them are copper plated.  I made a battery when they first started doing it making a stack of alternating types and immersing it in battery acid.  I might have sanded some of the copper plate off on alternate pennies.  I dont really understand batteries, but I think I got a couple of volts out of it.  They switched when the price of copper got to be two cents per penny, and people were melting them down and selling the copper.

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This reminded me I have two 1oz 0.999 silver coins dated 1986 that are almost black from oxidation i got them so long ago.  I think silver was $7/oz at the time.  Now it is $19.05, so I have made $24 since 1986.  Many years ago my mother in law gave me a $10 Canadian coin dated 1982 that says 1/4 oz 9999 fine gold.  It is still bright and shiny and now worth $454.  I totally forgot about them.  I used Tarnex on the silver coins and now they are bright and shiny and probably worth less from the mg's of silver oxide removed.  I dont care.  I like shiny.

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The US penny are made of zinc (and cobber), and that is why they make "good" batteries ;)  (just sand one side).

 

It's funny in DK it's actually not legal to destroy money, but US don't seem to care. 

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sparrow2 wrote:
... (and cobber), ...

cobber - Wiktionary

...

2. (Australia) A sweet consisting of a small block of hard caramel covered in chocolate.

...

Tasty export from Australia?

 

edit : wink

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Jul 20, 2020 - 11:36 PM
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Are those Neodymium magnets?

Yes (or some close cousin); you must be careful, these pack a quite a punch!  I got them at some cheapo place like 10 for $3....they are about 100x stronger than some other magnets I purchased.  I keep them up on the duct vent pipe, away from all the stuff I don't want magnetized, erased, or damaged.  Plus, I read that putting magnets on your ductwork induces a gammabeta field in the airflow that reduces hallucinations, palpitations, and quacking.  So far, it seems to really work!

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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you must be careful, these pack a quite a punch!

I know, I have the scars on my fingers to prove it.  They are great for generators. wink

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Sorry avrcandies, I think you need more magnets.

 

(Of course, you just said they were to reduce, not necessarily eliminate..) devil

David

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sparrow2 wrote:

The US penny are made of zinc (and cobber), and that is why they make "good" batteries ;)  (just sand one side).

 

It's funny in DK it's actually not legal to destroy money, but US don't seem to care. 

 

Yeah, I think that's what I did, sand one side.  It was almost 40 years ago, though.  Right, zinc, not nickle.

 

Goggle says:

According to Title 18, Chapter 17 of the U.S. Code, which sets out crimes related to coins and currency, anyone who “alters, defaces, mutilates, impairs, diminishes, falsifies, scales, or lightens” coins can face fines or prison time

 

But then says:

It is not illegal to melt, form, destroy, or otherwise modify US coins, including pennies, unless the objective is fraudulent or with the intent of selling the raw materials of the coins for profit. Projects that use coins as materials are entirely legal in the United States

 

It's the intertubes, so who knows what the truth is.

Last Edited: Tue. Jul 21, 2020 - 01:53 AM
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avrcandies wrote:
Plus, I read that putting magnets on your ductwork induces a gammabeta field in the airflow that reduces hallucinations, palpitations, and quacking.  So far, it seems to really work!

 

I need to get some more magnets.  The quacking is driving me crazy.  I don't mind the hallucinations or palpitations.

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MarkThomas wrote:
not nickle

 

No, not nickle. NICKEL damnit, Nickel. See e.g. https://ptable.com/

 

Away with these wierd Americanisms... and while we're at it, it's *sulphur*.

 

Neil <g,d,r>

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Don't confuse silicon with silicone ...I used to see that all the time.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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barnacle wrote:
No, not nickle. NICKEL damnit, Nickel.

That is just me being a crummy speller.  Sorry.  The spell checker didn't raise a fuss, though it did look weird to me.  Turns out Nickle is some programming language.  That's a nice periodic table.  I just bookmarked it.

 

barnacle wrote:
Away with these wierd Americanisms... and while we're at it, it's *sulphur*.

I go both ways with sulphate and sulfate.  The PT you sent shows "Sulfur".  You Europeans, tsk tsk.  Although I am ashamed to be American these days.    What does <g,d,r> mean? 

 

avrcandies wrote:
Don't confuse silicon with silicone ...I used to see that all the time.

Yeah, me too.  I get that one right, having worked in the silicon industry, and always wondered what a silicon boob job would be like.

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MarkThomas wrote:
always wondered what a silicon boob job would be like.

 

Firm.

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david.prentice wrote:
Firm.

LOL.  I was thinking you could do a couple of piercing and an underwire bra and have some pretty powerful computing ability.

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<g,d,r>? Grin, duck, run...

 

Neil

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barnacle wrote:
<g,d,r>? Grin, duck, run...

Good philosophy.

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MarkThomas wrote:

sparrow2 wrote:

The US penny are made of zinc (and cobber), and that is why they make "good" batteries ;)  (just sand one side).

 

It's funny in DK it's actually not legal to destroy money, but US don't seem to care. 

 

Yeah, I think that's what I did, sand one side.  It was almost 40 years ago, though.  Right, zinc, not nickle.

 

Goggle says:

According to Title 18, Chapter 17 of the U.S. Code, which sets out crimes related to coins and currency, anyone who “alters, defaces, mutilates, impairs, diminishes, falsifies, scales, or lightens” coins can face fines or prison time

 

But then says:

It is not illegal to melt, form, destroy, or otherwise modify US coins, including pennies, unless the objective is fraudulent or with the intent of selling the raw materials of the coins for profit. Projects that use coins as materials are entirely legal in the United States

 

It's the intertubes, so who knows what the truth is.

 

The important point is: Who's gonna know?

 

So I melted 200 US pennies to get zinc for a small sandcast part I was making. Prove it.

 

Gentlemen may prefer Blondes, but Real Men prefer Redheads!

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Krupski wrote:

The important point is: Who's gonna know?

Well, they seem to be able to make copper such that after re smelting it still is marked, they might also do that to the pennies. All they have to do is prove you used one or more.....

I found that interesting as there was a lot of copper theft specially on the rail ways. Now they have replaced the wiring with marked one, and have convicted a couple of people the theft has reduced a lot.

 

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Krupski wrote:

So I melted 200 US pennies to get zinc for a small sandcast part I was making. Prove it.

Did the copper float to the top?

 

meslomp wrote:
Well, they seem to be able to make copper such that after re smelting it still is marked, they might also do that to the pennies.

They must mix in some impurities that identifies it.  I think they do that with plastic explosives too.