Can't find datasheet for 64 pin 6502 [solved]

Go To Last Post
10 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Back in about 1985 I build a 6502 based controller.

 

But it used a 64 pin 6502 (about same size as a 6502 but the pins had different lengths, like some older LCD's )

And as I remember it also had build in RAM, and only needed a crystal to run.

 

Can any one tell me the name ? 

Last Edited: Mon. Jun 8, 2020 - 02:27 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

 

 

 

I'm sseing if i can get a link

 

finally got an actual link  

https://www.datasheetarchive.com/pdf/download.php?id=afe9fcf82358eb4440ef0b14600c6f39876b02&type=O&term=Rockwell%25206502

 

It was 1985!!

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2020 - 09:07 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

That chip had the option of Forth in rom.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks

 

For some reason I wanted it to have 192 in the part number, but that was the RAM size.

 

Was it not made in 1985 since you make that comment? 

I did not make the PCB but as I remember was the layout from a magazine probably Elector, and at the time it was a new chip.  

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ok it looks like it was a 6511Q, and from a photo I can see one made in (19)88 and that is probably correct for the time.

 

add:

there was also a 6511Q from (19)83 so 1985 was about correct I think

 

 

 

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 7, 2020 - 11:35 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

did you see

Back in about 1985 ...

It was 1985!!

Was it not made in 1985 since you make that comment? 

I don't understand your comment    ...I exclaimed (you are correct):   It was 1985!!

 

Maybe next time I will say:  You won a million dollars!!  &  hope that is more exciting.   After taxes are paid, it will feel like it is 1985.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Mon. Jun 8, 2020 - 12:46 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Great Scott Marty, We have got to get you back to the future! (1985)

 

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

This is mostly because of the thread about writhing to eeprom all the time.

 

And this chip was the first I have seen with a special Vcc for a part of the RAM (32 bytes) that can be used as a raw kind of eeprom, but I was not sure anymore it's so long ago :) 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

And this chip was the first I have seen with a special Vcc for a part of the RAM (32 bytes) that can be used as a raw kind of eeprom, but I was not sure anymore it's so long ago :) 

Wasn't there an actual processor module that included a battery (like a Dallas Semi type "block" chip)? I know they had RTC's, but I'm thinking of on that included a microcontroller.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Yes but that was just a LP static RAM with a batt. on top .