would you like to share your industrial experience

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#1
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Although this is a stupid question, But if someone wants to share their industrial experience, then it is highly appreciated. How did you get your first job? Mainly in which area have you worked?

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Even since the first industrial revolution, work has usually been on an industrial scale. I can say I've been quite industrious in my working career.

Care to be a bit more specific with your question? Seems awfully open-ended and why would you ask this question?

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Kartman wrote:
why would you ask this question?
Troll?

 

(seems to follow the same pattern as previous posts from ansh11, sky33, etc etc)

Last Edited: Tue. Apr 28, 2020 - 12:26 PM
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Aye. Kill it before it grows.

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How about you start - at least, by filling-in your profile ?

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I am studying electronics engineering in India. I am a student of the second year The reason for asking this question is that I will come to know a little bit about which skills are required in companies. What tool is mostly used for the role of embedded engineer? I can use the tool that is used the most for practice

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When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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muke12 wrote:

What tool is mostly used for the role of embedded engineer?

 

That question is impossible to answer. [EDIT] (Actually the answer is very simple - see below...)

 

Embedded engineering covers a very wide field of applications. My bread toaster has a microcontroller in it; it is an embedded application. My car has many microcontrollers in it; it too is an embedded application. The nuclear power plant supplying my electricity also uses microcontrollers. See where I am going? Every application needs a different set of tools.

 

Me, I've been 'doing' embedded for a long while. I started in a big company, worked for small companies in a variety of fields and now work for myself doing low-volume special projects. My commonly used tools will be different to someone like user clawson who works in a very different field.

 

It will also depend on what bit of 'embedded' you end up doing. In some companies you will just do hardware, in some just software, and in others both. Again, different tools are needed.

 

If I had to pick one tool, the answer is simple...your brain.

 

If I had to add another...it would be a pencil and paper.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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muke12 wrote:
What tool is mostly used for the role of embedded engineer? 

As Brian says, the single most important tool is the one between your ears!

 

IBM famously have the motto, "THINK!" 

 

 

The key thing you need to learn is to THINK - critically and analytically - about a problem: to analyse the situation, research options, and devise solutions.

 

Engineering is, at heart, a problem-solving exercise.

 

Don't get into the habit of just dumping questions on forums, and expecting everyone else to do the thinking for you.

 

EDIT

 

It has been said that the product of a good education is not what you know - but that you know how to find out.

 

This industry moves very quickly, so knowledge is soon out-of-date. What is important is that you understand the underlying  principles - and how to apply them.

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  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Wed. Apr 29, 2020 - 07:38 AM
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OK - So who still wears a tie at the office ?

I gradually stopped around 1998/1999 or so. It was about a year after "Dress Down Friday" came into existence.

 

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I understood, the most important is a problem-solving. Which means we should practice so much.  The more we practice, the more problem-solving skill will increase.  I shouldn't worry too much about which tool is more being useful in companies.  

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muke12 wrote:
I am a student of the second year 

So probably the most important thing is that you pay full attention in your classes. ask questions of your teachers. attend & participate in tutorials. do all the homework exercises. follow-up all suggested reading.

 

Don't run off on tangents (eg, RTOS)  - focus on the basics being taught.

 

EDIT

 

You still haven't filled-in your profile:

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Wed. Apr 29, 2020 - 08:56 AM
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Think! (or thwim).

 

Neil

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"Knowledge" is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.

 

"Wisdom" is understanding not to put it in a fruit salad.

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Brian Fairchild wrote:
Every application needs a different set of tools.
A rather wonky analogy...

 

If you have an interest in music you could take it in a few directions. Perhaps you play (overdriven) guitar and will join a thrash metal rock band. Perhaps you play piano and will become an expert in recording music for lifts and shopping malls. Perhaps you play violin and will join the London Royal Philharmonic. At the end of the day they are all "musicians" but the kind of music you play and the environment in which you do it can vary wildly.

 

Same is true of "embedded software engineers". So during your course of study you have to see what area interests you most (or perhaps which you think may be the most profitable if you haven't yet understood what is really important in life) then you build a specialisation in that area whether it be rock guitar, middle of the road piano or concert hall violins.