What are the AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128 ??

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Feb 14, 2020 - 01:49 AM
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Wow, package pinouts, they are looking goofy on my browser, better start tonight before they get out the Neuralizer.

 

my projects: https://github.com/epccs

Debugging is harder than programming - don’t write code you can’t debug! https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/help-it-doesnt-work

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Microchip direct appear to have some parts in stock. There is some confusion over the MOQ but, as a test, I've just ordered 25 pcs of the 128DA48. I'll see if the order gets accepted. If they arrive I'll be happy to bung a few out to fellow freaks in the UK and Europe.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Thanks!

 

https://www.microchipdirect.com/product/search/all/AVR128DA48

very low MOQ for QFN; QFP is MOQ one tray.

Haven't read the datasheet to see if QFN has wettable flanks (drag soldering is akin to wave soldering)

AVR128DA48 - 8-bit Microcontrollers

 

edit : Microchip - Samples Web Site (AVR128DA48)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. Mar 21, 2020 - 06:05 PM
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That moq on the qfp parts confused me. I chanced it and placed an order for 25pcs and the system accepted it. At the moment it looks like I might get them.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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QTouch® Modular Library Peripheral Touch Controller User's Guide

Appendices A and K for revision history and link to the library documentation

 

Touch Sensing | Release Notes - Developer Help

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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It certainly looks like the chip family I would have loved to have had 5 years ago...

Now, it's competing with those 120MHz CM4 chips...

 

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No DMA?  Bummer.

Letting the smoke out since 1978

 

 

 

 

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AVR DA-series may be seen as a follow-on to XMEGA D which doesn't have DMA.

IIRC, MPLAB X v5.35 has precursor for more AVR Dx-series.

edit : MPLAB X IDE | Microchip Technology

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. Mar 24, 2020 - 04:14 PM
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TB3233 Using ZCD to Implement Special Functions

...

B 03/2020 Updated repository links

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
That moq on the qfp parts confused me. I chanced it and placed an order for 25pcs and the system accepted it. At the moment it looks like I might get them.

 

I've just had notification that 25pcs of AVR128DA48 are on their way to me!

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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***Datasheets are now on the Microchip Website***

 

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloa...

 

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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***DIP parts now available on Microchip Direct***

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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I ordered a few of the DIP ones, taking advantage of the free shipping offer this month.

Something to play around while the quarantine continues...

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This DA family is impressive,

 

my projects: https://github.com/epccs

Debugging is harder than programming - don’t write code you can’t debug! https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/help-it-doesnt-work

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Wow, those pin currents and the clamp currents are much higher than the "old" chips.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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They've escaped from the factory and landed on my bench...

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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AVR128DA32 arrived to me today.

It attaches without modification to the breakout for mega4808.

 

 

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Just installed the new packs. So this is "xmega4", hum? Yeah, the architecture is different, of course 128Kb can't fit in the 64Kb linear address space. They use some kind of memory paging, or else it's back to progmem...

Time to do some experiments while waiting for the actual chips.

 

edit: and yes, as I feared constant strings are being processed like on classic AVRs, by being copied to SRAM first. So PROGMEM is back...

Last Edited: Thu. Mar 26, 2020 - 04:03 PM
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So PROGMEM is back...

Looking at the data sheet, it seems that you should be able to get away with up to 32K of flash mapped into the data address space.

I'm not sure you can convince the compiler that you've set that up, though.  (Linker scripts?  Can you just move the .rodata section to the 32k of high flash and have the linker complain if it overflows?)

 

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westfw wrote:
Linker scripts?  Can you just move the .rodata section to the 32k of high flash and have the linker complain if it overflows?

 

Well, the xmega3 have this

 

  .rodata  ADDR(.text) + SIZEOF (.text) + __RODATA_PM_OFFSET__    :
  {
    *(.rodata)
     *(.rodata*)
    *(.gnu.linkonce.r*)
  } AT> text

 

I'm guessing the AT> text means that .rodata is in the text memory region, whose size is known to the linker, so it should complain.

 

I really don't know what I'm doing, but maybe something like this for the xmega4?

  .rodata  0x8000 : AT __TEXT_REGION_LENGTH__ - 0x8000
  {
    *(.rodata)
     *(.rodata*)
    *(.gnu.linkonce.r*)
  } AT> text

 

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I may be misunderstanding your problem.

 

I have used the last 64KB of program memory as data on xmega128A1U.
There was no problem using far pointer and pgm_read_byte_far, is that frustrating?

 

#include <avr/io.h>
#include <avr/pgmspace.h>

uint_farptr_t pgm_ptr = 0x10000;
volatile uint8_t bar;

int main(void){
    bar = pgm_read_byte_far(pgm_ptr);
    asm("nop");
    while (1);
}

 

 

Edit:--------------------------------

Oh, I just noticed.
Declared in __flash and wanted to read from the RAM address without using pgm_read_byte_far.
I have no idea.

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 27, 2020 - 08:15 AM
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kabasan wrote:
I may be misunderstanding your problem.

 

As you know, on classic AVR we have 2 choices for using constant data:

  • let the compiler do it's thing, and we will be wasting SRAM, because all constant data is copied there
  • Use the facilities of pgmspace.h; this way you save SRAM, but now you need to use PROGMEM and cumbersome pgm_whatever to access the data

 

The flat address space of the AVR-0/1 had solved that problem, we could use standard C for constant data and not waste RAM. But now with the DA series the problem is back, so I'm just complaining a bit, I like to complain from time to time indecision

 

edit: and also complaining because they decided to recycle xmega4 scripts for the DA instead of going to the trouble of writing new ones that could make use of the linear mapped flash area.

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 27, 2020 - 09:56 AM
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Hmmm, nice, AVR128DA28 in a DIP package.

 

 

I really need to get the current project finished and shipped so I can free up some play time.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Mine have arrived too, they come in narrow 28 pin DIP packages like the mega328p. Background is my IKEA silicon mat that I use for soldering, it was on sale smiley

 

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Does anyone have EAGLE libraries yet?

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OMG, I am retarded, I used the wrong package, will try again...

 

update:

 

well that 48pin pitch seems wrong, but the DS is saying 0.5mm, it is not tested.

 

so less retarded, but probably mostly

Attachment(s): 

my projects: https://github.com/epccs

Debugging is harder than programming - don’t write code you can’t debug! https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/help-it-doesnt-work

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Woo hoo!

Both my AVR128DA28 (ordered via microchipDirect) and AVR128DA48 (ordered as samples) seem to be working and talking to MPLABX via a SNAP, and doing the whole Blink thing...
 

void my_delay() __attribute__((noinline));
void my_delay() {
    _delay_ms(300);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    PORTA.DIRSET = 1 << 7;
    while (1) {
        PORTA.OUTTGL = 1 << 7;
        my_delay();
    }
    while (1) {
    }
}

The 28-pin DIP is on a protoboard, and I dropped the 48pin chip onto a 4809 board that I have around...

AVR128da28 on protoboard

 

avr128da48 on a PCB designed for ATmega4809

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(interestingly, the MPLABX programmer doesn't seem to complain if I have the wrong chip connected.)

 

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TB3233 Using ZCD to Implement Special Functions

...

C 03/2020 Updated AVR-DA to AVR® MCU DA (AVR-DA), per latest trademarking

...

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Microchip has published some information about the new DB series!

 

AVR128DB64

AVR128DB48

AVR128DB32

AVR128DB28

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Sigh.  It would be nice if the NVM Controller wasn't COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from the mega0/xtiny series :-(

 

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New Functional Safety Ready AVR® DA Microcontroller Family Enables Real-Time Control, Connectivity and HMI Applications | Microchip Technology

Next-generation AVR MCU family features core independent peripherals, advanced analog and on-chip communications

Chandler, Arizona

May 5, 2020

...

 

Development Tools

Microchip’s AVR DA family of MCUs offers several options for software and hardware support. Software support includes Microchip’s MPLAB® X, MPLAB Xpress and Atmel Studio, code configuration tools including MCC and START, and compilers including GCC, XC8 and the IAR Embedded Workbench. A functional safety certified version of the XC8 compiler is available via Microchip’s Functional Safety Ready program. Hardware support is included in debuggers/programmers including MPLAB PICkit™ 4, MPLAB SNAP, Atmel ICE and the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano evaluation kit.

Pricing and Availability

The AVR DA family of MCUs is available in volume production in 10,000 quantities starting at $0.87. For additional information, contact a Microchip sales representative, authorized worldwide distributor, or visit Microchip’s website. To purchase products, visit our purchasing portal or contact a Microchip authorized distributor.

 

...

...

via https://www.microchip.com/RSS/recent-PRProduct.xml

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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New Functional Safety Ready MCU Features Real-Time Control and HMI - Embedded.com

by 

May 6, 2020

[third paragraph from bottom]

The AVR DA family of MCUs’ high memory density and SRAM-to-flash ratio make them suitable for both wireless and wired connected sensors nodes, as well as other stack-intensive applications.

 

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I know I'm a bit late, but I want in on the action too.

 

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Heh.  I got a couple of the Curiosity boards.

I observe that the slightly-staggered pin-header arrangement (AFAIK, invented by SparkFun to help hold the headers in place during soldering - I don't think they're tight enough to make soldering unnecessary) is really annoying when used with that long a strip of pins...  My poor fingers!

 

 

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Agree. I could never get the whole thing to go in on my 4809 CNANO. But I could test out my projects with a few header pins without soldering them, so the connection seems to be pretty decent (even with a 230.4k baud serial comm happening through the stuffed-in-but-not-soldered pins).

-Sam

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westfw wrote:

... is really annoying when used with that long a strip of pins...  My poor fingers!

I hear you. My fingers suffered too, but I managed to get the two full strips in.

While playing with the analog comparator, I found the first error in the (admittedly preliminary) datasheet. It says that the voltage reference for AC is using the DAC reference. This is not so. The AC has its own independent reference.

 

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new arrival, 91 parts, 3 in stock, 8 on order, ETA 12-Jun'20 to 7-Dec'20, 6 week to 30 week lead-time

AVR DA 8-Bit Microcontrollers - Microchip Technology | Mouser

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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new arrival, 100 in stock, 1 week lead time

AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kit - Microchip Technology | Mouser

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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via a banner on the home page

AVR DA | Microchip Technology

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Hello to everyone!

Unfortunately I have no AVR DA chips yet, so I cannot make the following test by myself. I need more PWM channels, so I’d like to use timer type A (TCA type) in split mode. Hoverer, I have some bad experience with this mode on XMEGA32E5, and in many other XMEGAs split mode doesn’t work as expected.

So, can you please confirm that in split mode timer really can generate 6  8-bit PWMs? XMEGA32E5 in this mode can generate 8-bit PWM but the number of available channels is not doubled as stated in datasheet.

TIA

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I tried it. The device used is DA32.

The test code is here.

The clock is 4MHz by default.

#include <avr/io.h>

FUSES = {
    .WDTCFG     = FUSE_WDTCFG_DEFAULT,
    .BODCFG     = FUSE_BODCFG_DEFAULT,
    .OSCCFG     = FUSE_OSCCFG_DEFAULT,
    .SYSCFG0    = FUSE_SYSCFG0_DEFAULT,
    .SYSCFG1    = FUSE_SYSCFG1_DEFAULT,
    .CODESIZE   = 0,
    .BOOTSIZE   = 0,
};

int main(void){
    PORTA.DIRSET = PIN0_bm | PIN1_bm | PIN2_bm | PIN3_bm | PIN4_bm | PIN5_bm;
    TCA0.SPLIT.CTRLD = TCA_SPLIT_SPLITM_bm;
    TCA0.SPLIT.CTRLB =  TCA_SPLIT_HCMP0EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_HCMP1EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_HCMP2EN_bm |
                        TCA_SPLIT_LCMP0EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_LCMP1EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_LCMP2EN_bm;
    TCA0.SPLIT.LPER = 99;   // WO0-2:40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HPER = 199;  // WO3-5:20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.LCMP0 = 9;   // WO0:10% @40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HCMP0 = 49;  // WO3:25% @20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.LCMP1 = 49;  // WO1:50% @40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HCMP1 = 99;  // WO4:50% @20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.LCMP2 = 89;  // WO2:90% @40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HCMP2 = 149; // WO5:75% @20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.CTRLA = TCA_SPLIT_CLKSEL_DIV1_gc | TCA_SPLIT_ENABLE_bm;
    while (1);
}

Observation on the scope seems to work well.

 

This is available not only in the DA series but also in all of the AVR0 / 1 series.

 

Edit: Add fuse settings

Last Edited: Sun. May 24, 2020 - 09:48 AM
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Thank you very much! I really appreciate your help.

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The pack seems to now have core version 4, the assembler in studio has an error with this version.

1.0.27 (2020-03-16) Corrected CRC selection. Added PTC interrupt vector and renamed NMI vector. Added LOCKBITS_DEFAULT.  
1.0.21 (2020-01-31) Added PTC information. Corrected SPI1 alternative pins for AVR128DA48 and AVR128DA64. Updated external clock and clock output signals. Corrected CORE_VERSION.  
1.0.16 (2019-11-07) Initial release.
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While trying to get the USART and CCL to do automatic collision detection and backoff on a half-duplex line, I came across something that isn't documented in the datasheet. In the USART CTRLA register description, there is one bit allocated for RS485/XDIR pin signalling:

But when looking in the device headerfile (at least ioavr128da48.h), it looks like there are two bits related to RS485:

 

/* RS485 Mode internal transmitter select */
typedef enum USART_RS485_enum
{
    USART_RS485_OFF_gc = (0x00<<0),  /* RS485 Mode disabled */
    USART_RS485_EXT_gc = (0x01<<0),  /* RS485 Mode External drive */
    USART_RS485_INT_gc = (0x02<<0),  /* RS485 Mode Internal drive */
} USART_RS485_t;

Is this a hidden feature, or just an error in the headerfile?

 

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