What AVR's are you guys using lately?

Go To Last Post
29 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Are many of you onto the new 0 series/1 series?

 

Or still using the mega/tiny series before these?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I have one product using M328P that will probably persist for a couple of years, at a rate of 20-50 per year (usually purchased in lots of 2-10). I use pocket programmers with these when they need to be updated in the field. When shipping exceeds programmer value (e.g. foreign country with heavy import controls either way, either end), the programmer is "used up".

 

I have a new product in development, similar in behavior to the first, using ATmega4808 or 4809. I am concerned about being able to do field software upgrades on these.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

Last Edited: Mon. Feb 17, 2020 - 10:10 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I've used the ATtiny817 in a couple of things recently.

 

Letting the smoke out since 1978

 

 

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Currently lots of mega328s and tiny4313s with some mega1284 thrown in for good measure. I am considering the mega4809 but may well skip over them once the new DA series is available.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I used Tiny412, Tiny212 and also Tiny214...all part of 1-series, seems to work fine so far. I've struggled a bit with the documentation at the beginning but MC looks like they updated them recently and a lot of documentation corrections have been made.

 

One point which I see it as quite important is that in these series (0/1 AVR) like many others, when the chip is not programmed then the pins are floating...that means you you will always need pull-up or pull down resistors (depending on your application) for the specific pins you are driving e.g. MOSFET with them.

 

for series programming you will need a good programmer, I've contacted many of the manufacturer and they seem not to have one except a company called Softlog. the programmer costs around 600 - 700 $

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 18, 2020 - 09:10 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ka7ehk wrote:

I have one product using M328P that will probably persist for a couple of years, at a rate of 20-50 per year (usually purchased in lots of 2-10). I use pocket programmers with these when they need to be updated in the field. When shipping exceeds programmer value (e.g. foreign country with heavy import controls either way, either end), the programmer is "used up".

 

I have a new product in development, similar in behavior to the first, using ATmega4808 or 4809. I am concerned about being able to do field software upgrades on these.

 

Jim

 

In the last time I have favored M328PB because of the low price. The 3208/4808 seems to be a very interesting alternative, and it has a lot of new features.

 

Erwin

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ka7ehk wrote:
I am concerned about being able to do field software upgrades on these.

 

If only I knew how to write mobile apps, probably could make some good money by writing a UPDI programmer via the audio jack of a mobile phone frown

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

El Tangas wrote:
a UPDI programmer via the audio jack of a mobile phone
The usual "way out" of a mobile phone is Bluetooth so you could make an AVR (or PIC?) based UPDI programmer with a BT interface then talk to it from inside the phone.

 

BTW I didn't understand Jim's comment which seemed to imly that bootloader updating might be "more difficult" in a 4808/4809 than a 328. Not sure why that would be - they can all do SPM.

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 18, 2020 - 12:06 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

My development system has been optimized for price, reliability, ease-of-use, and documentation. 

But I am limited to the ATMega328P and the ATMega2560 devices for everything to work reliably.

These devices have enough memory and range-of-peripherals for my current use.

I use exclusively the Arduino IDE and the Nano v.3 module development platform.  

Generally people stick with their current IDE until there is an order-of-magnitude performance increase of the MCU with only a doubling of price-per-unit.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Let's see, there's a Tiny 4313 on this board...

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

El Tangas wrote:
the audio jack of a mobile phone

phones have audio jacks?

 

I'm still using t25-t85, along with m32u4's(leonardo), may also use M328p(b)'s(nano).

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I've typically NOT used a bootloader. Rationale?

 

1) Some kind of non-bootload programming tool has to be used the first time (e.g. factory programming) so no saving there.

 

2) Customers are typically biologists, climate scientists, and such. For them, I think that dealing with a bootloader (with the corresponding laptop, cables, etc) in the field (think of "in the forest" and "in the rain") would be (a lot) more challenging than using one of alank2's little pocket programmers. 

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 18, 2020 - 08:12 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

328pb and 324pb on the board I have on the bench. I am looking at 4809, but I am starting to think I may skip it and go to the DA family. The DA48 looks like nearly a drop-in replacement to the 4809. Some pins had different ports if I recall.

 

update: I will just show themy schematic for each...

 

 

That side by side worked, was not expecting it to do that. Now... I don't see any difference, well it was late.

my projects: https://github.com/epccs

Debugging is harder than programming - don’t write code you can’t debug! https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/help-it-doesnt-work

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 18, 2020 - 08:15 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

1) factory (PCBA manufacturer), distributor, or microchipDIRECT

 

2) concur given, IIRC, how tight the current AVR is for that application.

A deeply embedded system doesn't have ICSP/TPI/PDI/UPDI available as these are at-risk (ESD/EFT/lightning/EMC/EMI) whereas a hardened UART is available.

A bootloader can be simple (low sizing) and the loader can be simple; Microchip has typical of each.

 


Value Added Capabilities | DigiKey

[1/4 page]

Custom Programming

AVR8 on Microchip Direct | AVR Freaks

GitHub - nerdralph/picoboot: Automatically exported from code.google.com/p/picoboot via picoboot v3 beta release | AVR Freaks

platformio remote run — PlatformIO 4.2.2a1 documentation

Remote Firmware Updates

...

edit :

Serial Port JSON Server (SPJS)

Programming Your Arduino from SPJS

...

For folks using SPJS in other environments [not Arduino Create] like ChiliPeppr, this means you'll be able to do firmware updates on your boards without much effort.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 18, 2020 - 11:02 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

A nice lovely SAMA5D44.....

EDITED, shite, don't say I put up another ARM post in an AVR forum.  smiley

Last Edited: Tue. Feb 18, 2020 - 09:24 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

mega2560 (legacy product)

PIC24FJ256...

PIC32MZ1024

 

As you can see I need flash, flash and more flash for heavily UI centric products, and I honestly can't see myself using AVR again or indeed any other 8-bitter.

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

They are already replacing the 0 series/1 series with something called the DA series?  Will it be UPDI as well?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

alank2 wrote:

Will it be UPDI as well?

 

Yes.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

alank2 wrote:
They are already replacing the 0 series/1 series with something called the DA series?
An improvement to an existing AVR CPU architecture instead of a replacement for unified-memory megaAVR.

What are the AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128 ?? | AVR Freaks

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

alank2 wrote:

They are already replacing the 0 series/1 series with something called the DA series?  Will it be UPDI as well?

Microchip doesn't seem to replace anything... 

OTOH, I don't see why would you use mega 0-series anymore once you have these DA's

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

They are already replacing the 0 series/1 series with something called the DA series?

 Well, the DA series isn't shipping yet, or even "announced", really(??)  Info is just leaking, or maybe we're being teased (maybe "real" customers have NDA info and timelines and such.)

It sort-of looks like Microchip marketing decided that Atmel's "Mega-0" name was silly, and wanted something more distinctive than a random 0 in the middle of the part number to distinguish the follow-on chips (the current mega-0 "family" is pretty small.)

If it's like other family releases (ie XMega), some of the rumored chips might take a long time to show up even after others are real (I don't think the Xmega128a4 ever showed up (though the A4U seems to exist now.))

 

In theory, I really like the Xtiny and Mega0 chips; the memory mapping in particular is a big improvement.  But I do miss the crystal oscillator (and it seems like a particularly weird thing to have left out.  Perhaps the low-end market served by 8bit microcontrollers was found to rarely need clock accuracy more than required for Serial Comm...)  In reality, I'm not a "real customer"; I just fiddle...

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I'm not sure how Mchip/Atmel has run out of names...is there some sort of limit?...all the names sound confusingly similar.  

I heard there will be an XtinymegaXDA-1 328PB  shipping within 3 leap years.

 

I'm still trying to figure out what is the name of their ICE programmer/debugger, so I can get some info on it. 

 

As far as bootloading...it can be problematic...I recently bought a moderate priced peripheral device & was PC interfacing to it (sending various settings/commands from the poor manual)...apparently I triggered some hidden bootloader sequence & also completely erased whatever the unit's code was, rendering it a useless junk hunk of plastic and circuit boards...now it doesn't so much as blink an LED, or power up.  The crew in China couldn't offer more help than "push the reset button". 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Fri. Feb 21, 2020 - 09:20 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

westfw wrote:
I do miss the crystal oscillator

 

On the DA, I guess the internal oscillator is good enough now to replace a resonator, and for accurate time, a TCXO is an option.

 

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/cts-frequency-controls/588S240X2CTT/588S240X2CTT-ND/7250604

 

The 5V TCXO is not common, but that may change.

 

Apparently, MC was trying to gear up for a late February release at a trade show in China, but that hit a hiccup due to ... well, it is well known what the problem is. So now we have to wait for late March while they build stock (I am guessing, but it sounds correct, doesn't it.)

my projects: https://github.com/epccs

Debugging is harder than programming - don’t write code you can’t debug! https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/help-it-doesnt-work

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Oh, the DA series has an hardware auto-tuner? That's cool.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

El Tangas wrote:

Oh, the DA series has an hardware auto-tuner? That's cool.

Have a look at the block diagram, there is an intriguing line inside the oscillator block.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

 

I found it, yes it must be the auto-tune tap.

 

 

edit: there is also a PLL, I wonder why they didn't connect the 32kHz crystal to it?

Last Edited: Sat. Feb 22, 2020 - 10:44 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

 I wonder why they didn't connect the 32kHz crystal to it?

My guess is that the PLL and internal 32K osc, is only one block. (and there is a good change that the OSC is 2x or even 4x) 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The PLL allows some of the timers to run at 48Mhz.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."