Friday Playtime

Go To Last Post
4 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1


One of my new years resolutions was to 'play' more with various chips/boards/ideas so I decided to give Friday afternoons over to this. Earlier this week I found that, somehow, I'd manged to accumulate a total of 8, yes 8, ATmega4809 Curiosity Nanos.

 

So I bought a Curiosity Nano Adapter and mounted one on it, along with a FTDI chip breakout...

 

 

The 4809 Curiosity has an on-board nEDBG unit and so I was able to add an external tool into Codevision which uses atprogram to upload my .hex file to the 4809.

 

I've now accomplished the first two steps we should all take...a 1Hz blinky and an 115200 baud "Hello World".

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Brian Fairchild wrote:
the first two steps we should all take...a 1Hz blinky and an 115200 baud "Hello World".

how many of the problems posted here would have been avoided if people did that?

 

I'd say it's probably over 50%

 

frown

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I always start with blinking an led! For one thing, it tells me if I have the clock running the speed I think I do.

 

Then I start adding functionality until I have the whole project working.

 

 

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

Without adult supervision.

Last Edited: Sat. Feb 15, 2020 - 04:01 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

As well as that, it tells you that you have got the tools working, the downloader working, at least some of the hardware working, the CPU running at the speed you expect, etc, etc ...

 

And having a LED that you know you can control is a great asset in testing & debugging going forward.

 

Similarly for the "Hello World".

 

These 2 things are key basic functionality before moving on to anything else.

 

EDIT

 

And a prime example of what happens when you don't do that:

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

#KeyBasicFunctionality

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Mon. Feb 17, 2020 - 02:24 PM