How many bits of error can be corrected by LDPC method?

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How many bits of error can be corrected by LDPC method?

mahdi damirchilu, my blog : dmf313

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How many miles per gallon can I get with my toyota pick up?

 

Answer: it depends on how it is driven!

I don't think your question can be answered given the info provided

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 

Last Edited: Tue. Dec 31, 2019 - 01:32 PM
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md3848 wrote:
LDPC method

You mean this:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-density_parity-check_code ?

 

Which, as Jim says, leads to the answer: "It depends".

 

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+

 

Well, Depends on what? Would you explain a little more?

mahdi damirchilu, my blog : dmf313

Last Edited: Tue. Dec 31, 2019 - 04:34 PM
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You're the one that's asking - what research have you done?

 

From what I can tell from that article, "LDPC" is not just one single thing - it's a whole class of a certain type of codes.

 

Therefore, the performance is going to depend on the particular type of LPDC you choose, and how you implement it.

 

So your question is a bit like saying "how many bits of error can a CRC detect" - that depends on which particular CRC you choose!

 

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This is kind of interesting... historically, parity has been a very weak error management process. When applied byte by byte, a parity violation could tell you that there has been at least a single bit error. But, it was very possible to have errors of two or more bits in which parity is preserved. 

 

LDPC seems to be potentially a lot stronger than that (re: above referenced Wikipedia article). And, there appears to be several classes of applications in which it is superior to turbo codes. 

 

I wish that I understood this stuff better. Maybe, some time, if I have nothing better to do, ... ha, ha, ha!

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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ka7ehk wrote:
I wish that I understood this stuff better

 

Me too. I use to work with ATCA-9305:

 

https://www.smartembedded.com/ec/product-datasheets/1398193020-ds.pdf/Artesyn-ATCA-9305.pdf

 

And a few boards like it, it had the LDPC 10GBase-T network fabric on the backplane in which it plugged in. I mostly recall struggles with the error correction code (ECC) memory that would self-correct (LDPC?). To detect if errors were happening during burn-in, we had to load a bare metal test application from the CPU manufacturer rather than running the Linux that was used for other tests. It needed some timing values that caused the struggle. At any rate, once the timing was figured out it was flawless, I don't recall seeing errors, and I probably unloaded 5000 of those things from burn-in.