Soldering the ATSAMW25

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#1
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I have got a project working nicely with the Xplained  version of the ATSAMW25. 

 

I would like to make my own PCB now.

 

I was wondering whether anybody had managed to solder the module version on to a PCB.  I am about to build a little reflow oven to do this sort of more awkward module and i/c where the contacts are not accessible, but has anybody had managed to do it with a hot air gun?

 

Regards

Mike

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you could try and first put on tin on the pads of the module. then with a hot air gun heat the PCb from the other side and place the module. you might get all pins connected with enough flux and perhaps a little tap on the module to force it down and have all the tin make a contact from the module to the PCB. But it will be a challenge.

 

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For something like this I bite the bullet and have a pcb assembled. It's far cheaper than bottles of Advil in the end. See marketplace for vendors in the USA and elsewhere.

Jim

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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This looks incredibly challenging to do. How will the heat get to those pads sandwiched between 2 PCBs?

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My personal approach to modules like this is stencil + low-temp solder paste + hotplate. I prefer the hotplate over the oven because I can nudge components around while the solder is molten. The low-temp solder allows for cheaper low-Tg PCBs and avoiding unsoldering components on the module. I use my oven far less than I thought I would. It's primary use is double-sided SMT boards that can't be done on the hotplate.

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I was thinking that if I had to solder that module I would use a hotplate / frying pan, also.

The hard part, however, is that it appears that the pads to not extend to the edge of the PCB, and they are a pretty fine pitch.

That means that aligning the device as you laid it on the PCB, prepped with a tiny dap of solder paste on the pads, would be the most challenging part of the project.

 

If I was going to do that I would likely verify the pad's alignment with respect to the case, and draw a case outline on the silkscreen, so as to allow one to visually center the module.

If the Ground pads under the module had a via then one could easily check connectivity of the ground pads, via the via, to another ground pin.

In that way one could insure that they were properly soldered.

 

Of course Tom has his own Pick and Place machine, maybe you could lay out your own small PCB and pay him to do a weekend run of making your own modules.

 

JC