copy hex code

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Dear all,

Is it possible to copy hex code on the atmega micro? (also fuse bits are lock)

How is Xmega?

is it any way to solve this problem?

(I am building a software by AVR and I afraid from copy it by others!!)

Can e.b help me?

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Read the section of the datasheet on lockbit's, to prevent code from being read, although there is no absolute protection, as any protection method can be broken for enough $$$.

Lockbit protection is on all AVR's, tiny's, xtiny's, mega's, and xmega's

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 

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I am building a software by AVR and I afraid from copy it by others!!

Don't be afraid, just get one of these shirts

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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If you're in a situation where you are even thinking about copying the hex code on some other microcontroller and disassembling it, then you should instead be developing the flow chart/algorithm for a rewrite of the entire project. It will be easier in the long run.  

 

If you want to ensure that your code in the AVR that you distribute isn't copied and placed into some other AVR without paying you, then review the lock bit section of the datasheet and experiment until you can feel assured that your code can't be copied.

 

However, given the small size of the memory of the AVR (well most AVRs), I recommend that you go open-source for the firmware aspect of your product and concentrate your wealth/income generating on support and first-in-line updates of your product.

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Simonetta wrote:
I recommend that you go open-source for the firmware aspect of your product and concentrate your wealth/income generating on support and first-in-line updates of your product.

Do you mean open source - or just not locking the chip?

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hasanzadeh99 wrote:

Dear all,

Is it possible to copy hex code on the atmega micro? (also fuse bits are lock)

How is Xmega?

is it any way to solve this problem?

(I am building a software by AVR and I afraid from copy it by others!!)

Can e.b help me?

 

Dear friend,  protect your job is important, mostly when you work for money.

I don't want to be the one to ruin your day for writing what I think is the truth.

Based on your previous posts here in the forum, and considering that you are using AVR in your code to be protected, and you have no idea how to protect it, I can suspect and suppose that your are quite starting in programming AVRs, or perhaps, any other microcontrollers, and based on that, you need to produce a lot of code much before you will start to make money with that.  Don't be mad with me, but normally people starting programming already think they will create something that will make them rich, and they want immediately to protect it, patent, etc.  Except in very rare cases, that is not what happens in real life.  What happens is you learn such programming and hardware, you produce a bunch of code and devices, you distribute free to people enjoy your participation in the world of technology, you learn with other's job, you grow your technical capacity, some people may recognize your capacity and effort, some may even hire you to work in this area, you may touch basis with some high angel and he gives you a fantastic idea, you develop it, find a great investor that believe in you and your job, put money on it, you go for the market with that idea, and find that somebody else produced a similar product by 1/3 of your price and it is already being sold on AliExpress by 30 different sellers.  Life sucks, believe me, I went through that door in the past.

 

Other than that, no matter so much what you write of code for AVR, if somebody tells me what your devices does, I and several others here in the forum can write the same code, perhaps even better without even looking at your code.

 

Sorry, all of this to say that "locking the flash and the code" helps to avoid people to simply copy your code and use, but will not protect your idea and product.

To really protect something you need money, large money, so you can hire a group of lawyers, registry patents in several countries, put real money in the project, produce in many thousands, put more real money in advertisement, distributions, etc. This is how Apple, LG, HP, Lenovo and IBM protect their assets and technology.  Locking bits on a chip is just to block the 15 years boy neighbor to copy your chip.

 

But yes, all the AVR line of uCs have ways to block the flash/eeprom from external reading, just read the documentation, it is easy.

 

Wagner Lipnharski
Orlando Florida USA

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I would not expect any protection technology you can actually get to protect you against a highly motivated attacker.

 

Which is to say: If it's worth the money to steal it, they can probably do so. But also, the reality is, it's not worth the money to steal it. It never is. So I wouldn't worry about it in the first place.