What are the AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128 ??

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While working on avr-libc3 I cam across the 8 bit AVR family AVRDx  with the core AVR8X

 

Part numbers: AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128

 

I can't find ANY data on these parts.  Although they smell like new xmega type devices.  They have Large numbers of IO and peripherals [5 Usarts, 2 TWI, 2 SPI, Many timers, etc], large (for an 8 bit device) memories [128K Flash and 16k Ram].

 

Anyone have any insight? Are they new unreleased parts, or old old parts I have never seen before?

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https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/come-join-us-mplab-now-supports-avrs?page=5#comment-2744286

[after the first separator]

...

The new AVR devices are in beta form for all tools except AVR simulator peripherals, MPLAB XC8, MPLAB ICD 4 :

  • AVR64DA128
  • AVR48DA128
  • AVR32DA128
  • AVR28DA128

...

 

edit :

Follow-on to the popular mega1284?  No

 

edit2 :

https://packs.download.microchip.com/#collapse-Microchip-AVRDx-DFP-pdsc

 

edit3 :

Definitely an XMEGA.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sun. Aug 11, 2019 - 02:34 AM
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gchapman wrote:

 

edit3 :

Definitely an XMEGA.

 

 

Except XMEGAS have family="XMEGAA" (or B, C, D or E)  core="AVR8_XMEGA" these new devices are:

family="AVRDx" core="AVR8X"

 

So it seems like a new Core architecture.  Maybe a successor to XMEGA?  They also sport single pin UPDI Programming and Debugging like the mega AVR 0 (4809, etc) and new attinys (416 etc).

 

 

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How I became confused :

 

'specs-avr48da128'

...

*asm_arch:
	-mmcu=avrxmega4

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Ahh, well I am guessing its probably the same instruction set as the xmega4.  Maybe it IS a different core internally, but from a programming perspective its the same as a xmega4.

 

Anyway, interesting chips.  I will keep an eye out for data when it drops.

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They also have a new peripheral "Zero Cross Detect".

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I'm not on the right computer to check this, but didn't / doesn't the Xmega A have a zero crossing detection built into its ADC?

That is one of the stated reasons for the 0V offset at the low end of the ADC, so one can see the signal go through the zero.

 

JC

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I'm not familiar with xmega, just comparing with UPDI "xtiny" chips.

The differences I find are the presence of a RAMPZ register (I'm curious to see how extended flash is implemented) and the aforementioned Zero Cross peripheral.

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I see

'Microchip.AVRDx_DFP.pdsc.txt'

...

vccmin="1.8"
vccmax="5.5" 

...

"MAPPED_PROGMEM" [32KB]

...

XMEGA D : 1.6V .. 3.6V, 32MHz, no DMA, no USB, program and data spaces

AVR DA   : 1.8V .. 5.5V, 32MHz, no DMA, no USB, program and data spaces, 32KB of program space mapped to data space

 

AVR DA is an excellent response to LogicGreen mega328P clone (mostly clone)

https://www.electrodragon.com/w/Logicgreen#LGT8F08.2F88.2F328_.28AVR_Compatible.29

 


'ioavr48da128.h'

/* Frequency select select */
typedef enum CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_enum
{
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_1M_gc = (0x00<<2),  /* 1 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_2M_gc = (0x01<<2),  /* 2 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_3M_gc = (0x02<<2),  /* 3 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_4M_gc = (0x03<<2),  /* 4 MHz system clock (default) */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_8M_gc = (0x05<<2),  /* 8 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_12M_gc = (0x06<<2),  /* 12 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_16M_gc = (0x07<<2),  /* 16 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_20M_gc = (0x08<<2),  /* 20 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_24M_gc = (0x09<<2),  /* 24 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_28M_gc = (0x0A<<2),  /* 28 MHz system clock */
    CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_32M_gc = (0x0B<<2),  /* 32 MHz system clock */
} CLKCTRL_FREQSEL_t;

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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USART appear to have a 16-bit baud rate register, BREAK, SYNC (auto-baud, generic or LIN)

/* Auto Baud Window select */
typedef enum USART_ABW_enum
{
    USART_ABW_WDW0_gc = (0x00<<6),  /* 18% tolerance */
    USART_ABW_WDW1_gc = (0x01<<6),  /* 15% tolerance */
    USART_ABW_WDW2_gc = (0x02<<6),  /* 21% tolerance */
    USART_ABW_WDW3_gc = (0x03<<6),  /* 25% tolerance */
} USART_ABW_t;

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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What do the first number refer to in Part numbers: AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128   ?

Package pin count ?

The 128 seems 128k Flash ? - but it's a little unusual to have the package pin count up-front in a part number ?

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Who-me wrote:
Package pin count ?
Yes

Who-me wrote:
The 128 seems 128k Flash ?
Yes, program space (likely flash though competitor's have some F-RAM)

Who-me wrote:
but it's a little unusual to have the package pin count up-front in a part number ?
Indeed though the first problem bound is usually I/O (pin count) (bounds : CPU, memory, I/O, power) (power - current, voltage or wide voltage range)

 


https://packs.download.microchip.com/#collapse-Microchip-AVRDx-DFP-pdsc

unzip atpack

edc directory

a .PIC file

search for (very bottom) :

  <edc:PinList edc:ppsflavor="atmel">

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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This is the new naming-scheme going forward: AVR<pin-count><family-letters><flash-size>

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je_ruud wrote:

This is the new naming-scheme going forward: AVR<pin-count><family-letters><flash-size>

 

Really ? That seems quite a strange decision, from a company that gave us :

PIC12

PIC16

PIC18

PIC24

PIC32

 

and no, those are not 12/16/18/24/32 pin parts ;)

 

ST have STM8, STM32,   SiLabs have EFM8, EFM32 , STC have STC8F, STC8H,...

Can anyone spot an industry pattern here ?

 

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Trying to find the reason behind marketing decisions is rarely worth the effort...

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I guess the tiny/mega/xmega nomenclature was getting too blurred and messy. At least this way we can actually learn more from the names.

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One 10b DAC

ioavr48da128.h

/* DAC.DATA  bit masks and bit positions */
#define DAC_DATA_gm  0xFFC0  /* Data group mask. */
#define DAC_DATA_gp  6  /* Data group position. */
#define DAC_DATA0_bm  (1<<6)  /* Data bit 0 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA0_bp  6  /* Data bit 0 position. */
#define DAC_DATA1_bm  (1<<7)  /* Data bit 1 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA1_bp  7  /* Data bit 1 position. */
#define DAC_DATA2_bm  (1<<8)  /* Data bit 2 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA2_bp  8  /* Data bit 2 position. */
#define DAC_DATA3_bm  (1<<9)  /* Data bit 3 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA3_bp  9  /* Data bit 3 position. */
#define DAC_DATA4_bm  (1<<10)  /* Data bit 4 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA4_bp  10  /* Data bit 4 position. */
#define DAC_DATA5_bm  (1<<11)  /* Data bit 5 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA5_bp  11  /* Data bit 5 position. */
#define DAC_DATA6_bm  (1<<12)  /* Data bit 6 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA6_bp  12  /* Data bit 6 position. */
#define DAC_DATA7_bm  (1<<13)  /* Data bit 7 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA7_bp  13  /* Data bit 7 position. */
#define DAC_DATA8_bm  (1<<14)  /* Data bit 8 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA8_bp  14  /* Data bit 8 position. */
#define DAC_DATA9_bm  (1<<15)  /* Data bit 9 mask. */
#define DAC_DATA9_bp  15  /* Data bit 9 position. */

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Oo-er more 16K RAM AVRs !

 

Shame about:

 

 

though :-(

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je_ruud wrote:
AVR<pin-count><family-letters><flash-size>

Seems bizarre to make pin-count the "most significant" part !

 

surprise

 

but then je_ruud wrote:
Trying to find the reason behind marketing decisions is rarely worth the effort

Sad, but true.

 

frown

Top Tips:

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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awneil wrote:

je_ruud wrote:
AVR<pin-count><family-letters><flash-size>

Seems bizarre to make pin-count the "most significant" part !

 

Agreed, but the above links seem to suggest Microchip had second thoughts and it now is 

 

AVR<flash-size><family-letters>​​​​​​​<pin-count>

 

Maybe someone smarter pointed out to marketing, that AVR32 was already taken, and no one is expecting AVR32 to be a 32 pin 8 bit AVR  ?

 

Of course, they still need to now avoid 32k Flash parts ;)

​​​​​​​

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Right you are. Marketing decide to swap it, so the device naming is now:

  AVR<flash-size><family-letters>​​​​​​​<pin-count>

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smiley

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http://packs.download.atmel.com/#collapse-Atmel-AVR-Dx-DFP-pdsc

...

1.0.16 (2019-11-07)

Initial release.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Mar 12, 2020 - 06:56 PM
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GitHub - MicrochipTech/Bootloaders_for_AVR-DA_Family

Loader's computer language is Python (scripts directory)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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That is interesting the atpack (Atmel.AVR-Dx_DFP.1.0.16.atpack\gcc\dev\avr128da64\device-specs\) has

 

*self_spec:
    %<mmcu=* -mmcu=avrxmega4 %<mshort-calls %<msp8

 

which seems like it might work on my old 18.04 Ubuntu packaged tool chain that is presently complaining about my m4809 project (I'm working on other stuff though so don't worry about this issue).

 

$ make
avr-gcc -Os -g -std=gnu99 -Wall -ffunction-sections -fdata-sections  -DF_CPU=16000000UL   -DBAUD=38400UL -I.  -mmcu=atmega4809 -B ../lib/Atmel.ATmega_DFP.1.4.331.atpack/gcc/dev/atmega4809/ -I ../lib/Atmel.ATmega_DFP.1.4.331.atpack/include/ -c -o main.o main.c
main.c:1:0: error: unknown core architecture ‘avrxmega3’ specified with ‘-mmcu=’
 /* Blink LED
 ^
main.c:1:0: note: supported core architectures: avr2 avr25 avr3 avr31 avr35 avr4 avr5 avr51 avr6 avrxmega2 avrxmega4 avrxmega5 avrxmega6 avrxmega7 avrtiny avr1
<builtin>: recipe for target 'main.o' failed
make: *** [main.o] Error 1

 

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avr128da64 @ $1.88...

 

https://www.futureelectronics.com/p/avr128da64-e-mr-C215076749

 

and my AS7 just got updates for the parts, I think this is about to release.

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It's possible to create Atmel Start projects for these chips, browsing the options gives a good idea of their capabilities.

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Atmel START Release Notes - November 30th, 2019 release

[bottom]

AVR Content

New devices

  • AVRDA Device Family:

    AVR128DA28, AVR128DA32, AVR128DA48, AVR128DA64

New Board

  • AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano

...

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Device Support | MPLAB X IDE (v5.30)

[pages 48 and 49]

[AVR DA-series and AVR DB-series]

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Using ZCD to Implement Special Functions

Author: Gheorghe Turcan, Microchip Technology Inc.

The Microchip AVR-DA family of microcontrollers features up to three Zero-Cross Detectors (ZCD) with flexible input selection, requiring only one external component, and configurable output (interrupts on rising/falling or both edges, event generation, and output inversion).

...

apparently added to documentation today.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
Author: Gheorghe Turcan, Microchip Technology Inc.

Hey, this guy has authored some pretty interesting appnotes. I sense Microchip's analog expertise in him, so it seems the AVR-DA are already a product of Atmel+Microchip know-how. I'm looking forward to these and more products.

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Hmmm, only just got around to taking a closer looks at these. A stroll through the device packs is very interesting.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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https://packs.download.microchip.com/#collapse-Microchip-AVR-Dx-DFP-pdsc

...

1.0.18 (2020-01-03)

Initial release.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Wed. Feb 19, 2020 - 01:39 AM
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AVR-DA Product Family Sell Sheet

via

Product Brochures

[27-Jan-2020]

 

edit :

  • AVR DA-series will be in Microchip's functional safety MCU
  • 'Atmel' removed other than in one URL (Atmel START)
  • AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano
  • SPDIP AVR128DA28; likewise SOIC

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. Feb 1, 2020 - 06:47 PM
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opps

 

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Ideally, that typo is due to the rush to release (announcement to major media)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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also atpack update

 

Atmel AVR-Dx Series Device Support (1.0.21)

 

update: oops BUILDNUMBER leaking in atpack package.content file (e.g., <release version="1.0.BUILDNUMBER">Added PTC information...)

 

Last Edited: Sat. Feb 1, 2020 - 07:26 PM
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ron_sutherland wrote:
Added PTC information

 

Yay... PTC events, when the PTC operation itself remains a secret. Really, I don't get this policy... What's the big deal about revealing how it operates? Is it alien tech?

 

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laugh

El Tangas wrote:
Is it alien tech?
PB megaAVR tech though I don't recall

AVR-DA Product Family Sell Sheet

[mid-page 1, top of right column]

  • [PTC] Boost Mode ...

PTC Driven Shield is a part of ATTINY817 Water Tolerance demo kit (tinyAVR 1-series)

A capacitance sensor can be a part of a distance sensor though that can also be by inductance; PTC may have more than the obvious use cases.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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PTC has to do with capacitive touch sensing, right?

 

https://github.com/epccs/AVR-Dx_...

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Yes and thanks for the archived pack.

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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ZCD is not in any other AVR? Has anyone used this sort of hardware (e.g., perhaps on a PIC), I think it sounds correct for a variable reluctance sensor (e.g., flow meter, crankshaft...).

 

https://www.microchip.com/design...

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Wed. Feb 19, 2020 - 01:33 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Nice, lots of example software. Now all we need are the chips to try it on!

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Feb 14, 2020 - 01:49 AM
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Wow, package pinouts, they are looking goofy on my browser, better start tonight before they get out the Neuralizer.

 

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Microchip direct appear to have some parts in stock. There is some confusion over the MOQ but, as a test, I've just ordered 25 pcs of the 128DA48. I'll see if the order gets accepted. If they arrive I'll be happy to bung a few out to fellow freaks in the UK and Europe.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Thanks!

 

https://www.microchipdirect.com/product/search/all/AVR128DA48

very low MOQ for QFN; QFP is MOQ one tray.

Haven't read the datasheet to see if QFN has wettable flanks (drag soldering is akin to wave soldering)

AVR128DA48 - 8-bit Microcontrollers

 

edit : Microchip - Samples Web Site (AVR128DA48)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. Mar 21, 2020 - 06:05 PM
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That moq on the qfp parts confused me. I chanced it and placed an order for 25pcs and the system accepted it. At the moment it looks like I might get them.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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QTouch® Modular Library Peripheral Touch Controller User's Guide

Appendices A and K for revision history and link to the library documentation

 

Touch Sensing | Release Notes - Developer Help

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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It certainly looks like the chip family I would have loved to have had 5 years ago...

Now, it's competing with those 120MHz CM4 chips...

 

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No DMA?  Bummer.

Letting the smoke out since 1978

 

 

 

 

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AVR DA-series may be seen as a follow-on to XMEGA D which doesn't have DMA.

IIRC, MPLAB X v5.35 has precursor for more AVR Dx-series.

edit : MPLAB X IDE | Microchip Technology

 

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Tue. Mar 24, 2020 - 04:14 PM
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TB3233 Using ZCD to Implement Special Functions

...

B 03/2020 Updated repository links

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
That moq on the qfp parts confused me. I chanced it and placed an order for 25pcs and the system accepted it. At the moment it looks like I might get them.

 

I've just had notification that 25pcs of AVR128DA48 are on their way to me!

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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***Datasheets are now on the Microchip Website***

 

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloa...

 

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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***DIP parts now available on Microchip Direct***

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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I ordered a few of the DIP ones, taking advantage of the free shipping offer this month.

Something to play around while the quarantine continues...

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This DA family is impressive,

 

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Wow, those pin currents and the clamp currents are much higher than the "old" chips.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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They've escaped from the factory and landed on my bench...

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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AVR128DA32 arrived to me today.

It attaches without modification to the breakout for mega4808.

 

 

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Just installed the new packs. So this is "xmega4", hum? Yeah, the architecture is different, of course 128Kb can't fit in the 64Kb linear address space. They use some kind of memory paging, or else it's back to progmem...

Time to do some experiments while waiting for the actual chips.

 

edit: and yes, as I feared constant strings are being processed like on classic AVRs, by being copied to SRAM first. So PROGMEM is back...

Last Edited: Thu. Mar 26, 2020 - 04:03 PM
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So PROGMEM is back...

Looking at the data sheet, it seems that you should be able to get away with up to 32K of flash mapped into the data address space.

I'm not sure you can convince the compiler that you've set that up, though.  (Linker scripts?  Can you just move the .rodata section to the 32k of high flash and have the linker complain if it overflows?)

 

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westfw wrote:
Linker scripts?  Can you just move the .rodata section to the 32k of high flash and have the linker complain if it overflows?

 

Well, the xmega3 have this

 

  .rodata  ADDR(.text) + SIZEOF (.text) + __RODATA_PM_OFFSET__    :
  {
    *(.rodata)
     *(.rodata*)
    *(.gnu.linkonce.r*)
  } AT> text

 

I'm guessing the AT> text means that .rodata is in the text memory region, whose size is known to the linker, so it should complain.

 

I really don't know what I'm doing, but maybe something like this for the xmega4?

  .rodata  0x8000 : AT __TEXT_REGION_LENGTH__ - 0x8000
  {
    *(.rodata)
     *(.rodata*)
    *(.gnu.linkonce.r*)
  } AT> text

 

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I may be misunderstanding your problem.

 

I have used the last 64KB of program memory as data on xmega128A1U.
There was no problem using far pointer and pgm_read_byte_far, is that frustrating?

 

#include <avr/io.h>
#include <avr/pgmspace.h>

uint_farptr_t pgm_ptr = 0x10000;
volatile uint8_t bar;

int main(void){
    bar = pgm_read_byte_far(pgm_ptr);
    asm("nop");
    while (1);
}

 

 

Edit:--------------------------------

Oh, I just noticed.
Declared in __flash and wanted to read from the RAM address without using pgm_read_byte_far.
I have no idea.

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 27, 2020 - 08:15 AM
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kabasan wrote:
I may be misunderstanding your problem.

 

As you know, on classic AVR we have 2 choices for using constant data:

  • let the compiler do it's thing, and we will be wasting SRAM, because all constant data is copied there
  • Use the facilities of pgmspace.h; this way you save SRAM, but now you need to use PROGMEM and cumbersome pgm_whatever to access the data

 

The flat address space of the AVR-0/1 had solved that problem, we could use standard C for constant data and not waste RAM. But now with the DA series the problem is back, so I'm just complaining a bit, I like to complain from time to time indecision

 

edit: and also complaining because they decided to recycle xmega4 scripts for the DA instead of going to the trouble of writing new ones that could make use of the linear mapped flash area.

Last Edited: Fri. Mar 27, 2020 - 09:56 AM
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Hmmm, nice, AVR128DA28 in a DIP package.

 

 

I really need to get the current project finished and shipped so I can free up some play time.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Mine have arrived too, they come in narrow 28 pin DIP packages like the mega328p. Background is my IKEA silicon mat that I use for soldering, it was on sale smiley

 

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Does anyone have EAGLE libraries yet?

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OMG, I am retarded, I used the wrong package, will try again...

 

update:

 

well that 48pin pitch seems wrong, but the DS is saying 0.5mm, it is not tested.

 

so less retarded, but probably mostly

Attachment(s): 

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Woo hoo!

Both my AVR128DA28 (ordered via microchipDirect) and AVR128DA48 (ordered as samples) seem to be working and talking to MPLABX via a SNAP, and doing the whole Blink thing...
 

void my_delay() __attribute__((noinline));
void my_delay() {
    _delay_ms(300);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    PORTA.DIRSET = 1 << 7;
    while (1) {
        PORTA.OUTTGL = 1 << 7;
        my_delay();
    }
    while (1) {
    }
}

The 28-pin DIP is on a protoboard, and I dropped the 48pin chip onto a 4809 board that I have around...

AVR128da28 on protoboard

 

avr128da48 on a PCB designed for ATmega4809

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(interestingly, the MPLABX programmer doesn't seem to complain if I have the wrong chip connected.)

 

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TB3233 Using ZCD to Implement Special Functions

...

C 03/2020 Updated AVR-DA to AVR® MCU DA (AVR-DA), per latest trademarking

...

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Microchip has published some information about the new DB series!

 

AVR128DB64

AVR128DB48

AVR128DB32

AVR128DB28

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Sigh.  It would be nice if the NVM Controller wasn't COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from the mega0/xtiny series :-(

 

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New Functional Safety Ready AVR® DA Microcontroller Family Enables Real-Time Control, Connectivity and HMI Applications | Microchip Technology

Next-generation AVR MCU family features core independent peripherals, advanced analog and on-chip communications

Chandler, Arizona

May 5, 2020

...

 

Development Tools

Microchip’s AVR DA family of MCUs offers several options for software and hardware support. Software support includes Microchip’s MPLAB® X, MPLAB Xpress and Atmel Studio, code configuration tools including MCC and START, and compilers including GCC, XC8 and the IAR Embedded Workbench. A functional safety certified version of the XC8 compiler is available via Microchip’s Functional Safety Ready program. Hardware support is included in debuggers/programmers including MPLAB PICkit™ 4, MPLAB SNAP, Atmel ICE and the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano evaluation kit.

Pricing and Availability

The AVR DA family of MCUs is available in volume production in 10,000 quantities starting at $0.87. For additional information, contact a Microchip sales representative, authorized worldwide distributor, or visit Microchip’s website. To purchase products, visit our purchasing portal or contact a Microchip authorized distributor.

 

...

...

via https://www.microchip.com/RSS/recent-PRProduct.xml

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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New Functional Safety Ready MCU Features Real-Time Control and HMI - Embedded.com

by 

May 6, 2020

[third paragraph from bottom]

The AVR DA family of MCUs’ high memory density and SRAM-to-flash ratio make them suitable for both wireless and wired connected sensors nodes, as well as other stack-intensive applications.

 

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I know I'm a bit late, but I want in on the action too.

 

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Heh.  I got a couple of the Curiosity boards.

I observe that the slightly-staggered pin-header arrangement (AFAIK, invented by SparkFun to help hold the headers in place during soldering - I don't think they're tight enough to make soldering unnecessary) is really annoying when used with that long a strip of pins...  My poor fingers!

 

 

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Agree. I could never get the whole thing to go in on my 4809 CNANO. But I could test out my projects with a few header pins without soldering them, so the connection seems to be pretty decent (even with a 230.4k baud serial comm happening through the stuffed-in-but-not-soldered pins).

-Sam

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westfw wrote:

... is really annoying when used with that long a strip of pins...  My poor fingers!

I hear you. My fingers suffered too, but I managed to get the two full strips in.

While playing with the analog comparator, I found the first error in the (admittedly preliminary) datasheet. It says that the voltage reference for AC is using the DAC reference. This is not so. The AC has its own independent reference.

 

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new arrival, 91 parts, 3 in stock, 8 on order, ETA 12-Jun'20 to 7-Dec'20, 6 week to 30 week lead-time

AVR DA 8-Bit Microcontrollers - Microchip Technology | Mouser

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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new arrival, 100 in stock, 1 week lead time

AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kit - Microchip Technology | Mouser

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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via a banner on the home page

AVR DA | Microchip Technology

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Hello to everyone!

Unfortunately I have no AVR DA chips yet, so I cannot make the following test by myself. I need more PWM channels, so I’d like to use timer type A (TCA type) in split mode. Hoverer, I have some bad experience with this mode on XMEGA32E5, and in many other XMEGAs split mode doesn’t work as expected.

So, can you please confirm that in split mode timer really can generate 6  8-bit PWMs? XMEGA32E5 in this mode can generate 8-bit PWM but the number of available channels is not doubled as stated in datasheet.

TIA

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I tried it. The device used is DA32.

The test code is here.

The clock is 4MHz by default.

#include <avr/io.h>

FUSES = {
    .WDTCFG     = FUSE_WDTCFG_DEFAULT,
    .BODCFG     = FUSE_BODCFG_DEFAULT,
    .OSCCFG     = FUSE_OSCCFG_DEFAULT,
    .SYSCFG0    = FUSE_SYSCFG0_DEFAULT,
    .SYSCFG1    = FUSE_SYSCFG1_DEFAULT,
    .CODESIZE   = 0,
    .BOOTSIZE   = 0,
};

int main(void){
    PORTA.DIRSET = PIN0_bm | PIN1_bm | PIN2_bm | PIN3_bm | PIN4_bm | PIN5_bm;
    TCA0.SPLIT.CTRLD = TCA_SPLIT_SPLITM_bm;
    TCA0.SPLIT.CTRLB =  TCA_SPLIT_HCMP0EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_HCMP1EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_HCMP2EN_bm |
                        TCA_SPLIT_LCMP0EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_LCMP1EN_bm | TCA_SPLIT_LCMP2EN_bm;
    TCA0.SPLIT.LPER = 99;   // WO0-2:40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HPER = 199;  // WO3-5:20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.LCMP0 = 9;   // WO0:10% @40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HCMP0 = 49;  // WO3:25% @20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.LCMP1 = 49;  // WO1:50% @40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HCMP1 = 99;  // WO4:50% @20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.LCMP2 = 89;  // WO2:90% @40KHz
    TCA0.SPLIT.HCMP2 = 149; // WO5:75% @20KHz

    TCA0.SPLIT.CTRLA = TCA_SPLIT_CLKSEL_DIV1_gc | TCA_SPLIT_ENABLE_bm;
    while (1);
}

Observation on the scope seems to work well.

 

This is available not only in the DA series but also in all of the AVR0 / 1 series.

 

Edit: Add fuse settings

Last Edited: Sun. May 24, 2020 - 09:48 AM
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Thank you very much! I really appreciate your help.

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The pack seems to now have core version 4, the assembler in studio has an error with this version.

1.0.27 (2020-03-16) Corrected CRC selection. Added PTC interrupt vector and renamed NMI vector. Added LOCKBITS_DEFAULT.  
1.0.21 (2020-01-31) Added PTC information. Corrected SPI1 alternative pins for AVR128DA48 and AVR128DA64. Updated external clock and clock output signals. Corrected CORE_VERSION.  
1.0.16 (2019-11-07) Initial release.
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While trying to get the USART and CCL to do automatic collision detection and backoff on a half-duplex line, I came across something that isn't documented in the datasheet. In the USART CTRLA register description, there is one bit allocated for RS485/XDIR pin signalling:

But when looking in the device headerfile (at least ioavr128da48.h), it looks like there are two bits related to RS485:

 

/* RS485 Mode internal transmitter select */
typedef enum USART_RS485_enum
{
    USART_RS485_OFF_gc = (0x00<<0),  /* RS485 Mode disabled */
    USART_RS485_EXT_gc = (0x01<<0),  /* RS485 Mode External drive */
    USART_RS485_INT_gc = (0x02<<0),  /* RS485 Mode Internal drive */
} USART_RS485_t;

Is this a hidden feature, or just an error in the headerfile?

 

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Probably a mistake in the data sheet.
AVR0 / 1 series has that function.

 

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I tried "AUTO TUNE" of the clock controller.

I used AVR128DA28.

 

The crystal frequency is off by about 46ppm, but I don't have a more better caps.

In low power mode, oscillation margin 3 (147k in series) could not be achieved, so it is normal mode.

 

 

OSCHF 1MHz output.

It worked fine, but the adjustment steps seems to be around 0.4%, the same as manual. Don't expect too much.

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Spence Konde has made his DA/DB libraries for arduino public; there have been rumors of this for some time.

 

https://github.com/SpenceKonde/DxCore

 

One thinkg I looked at was TWI to see what he has changed between m4809 and the DA.

 

https://github.com/SpenceKonde/DxCore/commit/e647acc0b298fd122e087a115688b06f3997c827#diff-fc520982d3a1665f735bb2f0d3f61c09

 

update: think was wrong

Last Edited: Mon. Aug 10, 2020 - 06:54 PM
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No datasheet for the DB, yet?

That's a bit frustrating...

 

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arrived this mid-evening

AVR128DB28/32/48/64 Data Sheet

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Nice, the DB has an HF oscillator circuit.

 

 

But making it work needs some thought (like the 328pb and 324pb) I guess. At least the data sheet has guides.

 

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Wow, gotta love it.

 

Adding back the HF Xtal is, at least for my projects, a great improvement.

I've used the Xmega32E5 for some little projects, but having a wide selection  of Vrefs, and having 3 internal Op-amps for Analog Front End Signal Conditioning is a great feature.

The two level priority interrupt is a step down from the 3 Level interrupt controller in the Xmegas, but is a big step up from a single level controller in the classic AVR Mega and Tiny micros.

Although the core runs at 24 MHz, several T/C's can be clocked at 48 MHz, in spec.

A couple of the micros have 6 USARTs... (Maybe the DC version will have a USB module).

Plus the Event System, ADC,DAC, CCL (with 6 tables), the ZCD, and the usual modules.

Now, if I could just find a few more hours in the day to tinker I'd be all set!

 

JC

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DocJC wrote:

Wow, gotta love it.

Adding back the HF Xtal is, at least for my projects, a great improvement.

 

Yes, leaving off a XTAL on larger parts like these, is certainly an oops they must have copped flack over.

I'm seeing a general trend to adding back XTAL's after some vendors (driven by bean counters) decided "over 50% of users do not use a Xtal, thus it is not a needed feature"

They fail to grasp, with modern MUCs pretty much every application has some peripherals unused. Parts are chosen because they are flexible.

 

I would also like to see MCU parts spec'd to ensure operation from clipped-sine oscillators, as those are now widespread and very cheap, thanks to huge consumer volumes.

Most Xtal amplifiers would be 'good enough',  for 19.2MHz & 26.0MHz, and may be more marginal at 48MHz.

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DocJC wrote:
Adding back the HF Xtal is, at least for my projects, a great improvement.
AVR128DB48 Curiosity Nano is forthcoming.

DocJC wrote:
(Maybe the DC version will have a USB module).
Should as USB megaAVR are long-in-tooth compared to the progression made in USB PIC (crystal-less, UART autobaud and FBRG)

 


AVR128DB48_Curiosity_Nano via Schematics

VXM7 - Clock and Timing - Quartz Crystals (Microchip Technology)

VXM7-9040-16M0000000 (MicrochipDIRECT)

AVR128DB48 Curiosity Nano (archived)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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it would be nice to have a short DA/DB feature comparison. The differences that I have recognized:

  1. PTC is missing on DB
  2. Op Amp has been added on DB
  3. External XTAL has been added on DB

 

Are there any other differences that I have missed?

 

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Multi-voltage IO in AVR-DB on one port.

in AVR128DB48_Curiosity_Nano

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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DA and DB chips are very promising, however, I wonder why they don’t have DMA? Very weird thing is CRCScan subsystem. As a source, only FLASH memory can be selected, whereas in XMEGA CRCScan can by feed by DMA or by the program (CRC.DATA register). Because CRC16 and CRC32 calculations can be time consuming, I don’t understand why designers of the chip didn’t add such a functionality?

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TFrancuz wrote:
... I wonder why they don’t have DMA?
Another bus matrix master (arbitration and CPU timing)

TFrancuz wrote:
As a source, only FLASH memory can be selected, ...
Flash endurance is more affected by high temperature and radiation than SRAM.

 


AVR® Instruction Set Manual

[page 17]

...

AVRxt

A combination of AVRe+ and AVRxm. Available instructions are the same as AVRe+, but the timing has been improved compared to AVR, AVRe, AVRe+ and AVRxm.

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Well the xmega have DMA and these chips are basically xmega, so I don't see any technical reason for the lack of DMA. Maybe the DMA controller is very complex and would drive up manufacturing cost? IDK.

 

Maybe the AVF-DC or AVR-DD will have DMA...

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El Tangas wrote:
Well the xmega have DMA and these chips are basically xmega, so I don't see any technical reason for the lack of DMA. Maybe the DMA controller is very complex and would drive up manufacturing cost? IDK.

But they already did it in XMEGA, and DMA can really revitalize an 8-bit MCU.

gchapman wrote:

Flash endurance is more affected by high temperature and radiation than SRAM.

CRC for RAM protection is nonsense, but frequently CRC is used in different transmission, so hardware CRC is a nice option in 8-bit MCU. The hardware is already present, so I don't understand why it is not implemented.

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And you will one day say:
"Why CRC-16-IBM isn't there?"

 

Desire never ends...

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kabasan wrote:

And you will one day say:
"Why CRC-16-IBM isn't there?"

 

Desire never ends...

It's true, however, if CRC machinery is already present, why not use it?

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El Tangas wrote:
Maybe the AVF-DC or AVR-DD will have DMA...
relative to a USB device controller, maybe not.

USB megaAVR have USB dual-port RAM.

USB XMEGA have DMA and the four two-cycle synchronization RMW instructions (XCH, LAS, LAC, LAT)

 

edit : strikethru plus

El Tangas wrote:
Well the xmega have DMA and these chips are basically xmega, ...
AVRxm vs AVRxt :

https://www.eembc.org/viewer/?benchmark_seq=13036,13037

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sun. Aug 23, 2020 - 05:02 PM
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DB series also appears to have this...

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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MVIO - Multi-voltage I/O

 

 

I have never seen this on an MCU before; I think I need it cool

 

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Aug 27, 2020 - 02:14 AM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Aug 28, 2020 - 11:36 PM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

AVR DD Product Brief

 

I see nothing new in it.

What makes this that it it deserves the DD title?

 

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gdhospers wrote:

gchapman wrote:

AVR DD Product Brief

I see nothing new in it.

What makes this that it it deserves the DD title?

 

Apart from 24MHz operation, and a slew of the new design timers, and mixed voltage IO, and zero-crossing detectors, and an event system, and a CRC unit, and enhanced USARTs, and two-level interrupts, and user-row NV memory, and high precision internal oscillator, and single pin program/debug, and inbuilt precision oscillator, and a DAC then there is, indeed, nothing new.

 

It's a family of products, something Microchip have always been good at and something Atmel never were.

 

The DD family has 12 members, in 4 package sizes and 3 memory sizes.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Possibly reduced die size for reduced price.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
It's a family of products, something Microchip have always been good at and something Atmel never were.
Thanks for more AVR in DIP.

There's an appeal for a proof-of-concept on a typical protoboard into an enclosure such that the customer can have at it early.

 

P.S.

Device Support | MPLAB X IDE v5.40

[search for AVR64DD, Atmel-ICE only]

 


https://www.microchip.com/sitesearch/Search/all/AVR64DD28

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gdhospers wrote:
I see nothing new in it

Sure it is something new: Now 12Bit ADC and 64KB Flash inside small SOIC14. Great.

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In pictures...

 

 

 

...hmmm, I wonder the DC family will be?..

 

 

So, currently a whole set of chips that overlap at the 28/32 pins point.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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And how about the other, new AVR devices mentioned in the MPLABX support document:

 

AVR EA and AVRFPGA!

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...with consistent memory quantities as you move up the ranges...

 

 

 

 

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Just to kill any rumours and speculations, AVRFPGA is an internal development platform.

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Anxiously awaiting an attiny85 upgrade.   Avr32de08?

(although, perhaps silly.  The t85 seems very popular with hobbyists because of the dip package, but size-wise there are already smt xTinys that fit...)

 

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Excellent!

IIRC, Motorola 6809 prototype (before first wafer fab) was two stacked PCBA of about 15cm*10cm each.

AVR in a FPGA :

Alorium Technology | FPGA Development Boards | Arduino Compatible

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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je_ruud wrote:

Just to kill any rumours and speculations, AVRFPGA is an internal development platform.

Nuts!

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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je_ruud wrote:
Just to kill any rumours and speculations, AVRFPGA is an internal development platform.

 

Hehe, it was obvious to most I think, but yes, some may have thought it could be a whole new area :)

 

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gchapman wrote:

IIRC, Motorola 6809 prototype (before first wafer fab) was two stacked PCBA of about 15cm*10cm each.

Ten:

https://tlindner.macmess.org/?page_id=119

Photo 2: Breadboard debug. The gate level TTL model of the processor
involves ten boards of 80 to 120 integrated circuits each. Many of the
required 10,000 connections will be wrong. The system must be tested to find
and correct construction and logic errors.
Crowds are not unusual; here we have Don Tietjen, Katy Miller, James
Tietjen, Steven Messinger (almost hidden), Mike Shapiro and Bill Keshlear.

Although they seem later to have got that down to one:

Photo 3: 6809 emulator board. Software and systems engineers implement
a functional equivalent of the 6809 as a 6800 program. A 6800 to 6809 cross
assembler allows 6809 programs to be assembled and then executed as a
check of the architectural design.

 

 

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

Last Edited: Wed. Sep 2, 2020 - 07:24 PM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Mon. Sep 7, 2020 - 11:16 PM
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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. Sep 12, 2020 - 10:41 AM
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Electric Load smiley, where are my going to find the time.

 

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http://packs.download.atmel.com/#collapse-Atmel-AVR-Dx-DFP-pdsc

...

 

1.4.73 (2020-09-11)

Corrected RAMPZ mask. Corrected typo in TCB CLKSEL value. Removed unavailable options in PORTMUX for device variants in smaller packages.

 

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Something seems to be different with the AVR-Dx protection diodes. Why is their voltage drop so low, and current rating so large? Are they some kind of Schottky diodes?

 

 

edit: no, I measured with a multimeter and they are regular diodes, so IDK why the datasheet says says "VDD + 0.3V" instead of "VDD + 0.5V" as in normal AVRs.

 

Last Edited: Tue. Sep 15, 2020 - 02:06 PM
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El Tangas wrote:

edit: no, I measured with a multimeter and they are regular diodes, so IDK why the datasheet says says "VDD + 0.3V" instead of "VDD + 0.5V" as in normal AVRs.

 

At higher temperatures the voltage drop will be lower so maybe that figure is to cover the whole operating range?

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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HF crystal was not done as DS says...

 

 

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Dear Microchip, please may we have one with an on-chip CAN controller peripheral ? Pref in a thru-hole package. Then I can finally tell my PIC-bothering friends to STFU :)

 

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obdevel wrote:
please may we have one with an on-chip CAN controller peripheral ? Pref in a thru-hole package. Then I can finally tell my PIC-bothering friends to STFU :)

This is much more BB friendly than a dip chip  https://www.sparkfun.com/product...

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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ki0bk wrote:
This is much more BB friendly than a dip chip  https://www.sparkfun.com/product...
Not very friendly to the pocketbook, though...

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

Last Edited: Tue. Sep 15, 2020 - 07:33 PM
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pcb files are free for the download, make your own.

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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ki0bk wrote:

pcb files are free for the download, make your own.

 

I may have 'borrowed' elements of that precise design a couple of years back**. I really need on-chip CAN in a DIP package, for which PIC has several options. Many of my designs' users are averse to surface mount assembly. And the AT90CAN is a rather old and expensive part compared to the devices on this thread.

 

** which is how I know that the ICSP interface uses the UART pins and not the usual SPI ones.

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mostly AVR DB in Sept'20 Atmel START

Atmel START Release Notes

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

AVR® EA Product Brief

 

Hmm, the MHz on these parts is creeping downwards too ? 

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gchapman wrote:

AVR® EA Product Brief

 

So, slightly cut-down Dx series chips.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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A small 28-Pin AVR-EA has one more, practical Type-A TCA timer than same 28-Pin AVR-Dx. The only advantage I can find... 🤔

Last Edited: Sat. Sep 19, 2020 - 10:33 PM
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AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano User Guide

[page 29]

...

 

B

09/2020

Corrected CDC RX and TX pins in the “On-Board Debugger Connections” table. Corrected function description in the “Crystal Connections” table. The “Crystal Connection and Cut Straps” image is updated.

 

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Apparently there is also an AVR-DD:

 

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloa...

 

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AVR-DC? Hmm... or should I say Ω. All AVR are DC.

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I was wondering about "DC."  Perhaps they skipped it for reasons similar to why Microsoft (supposedly) skipped "Windows 9"

In any case, searching Microchip for "DD" was much more productive than searching for "DC"  :-)

 

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The Industry’s First Integrated Zero Cross Detection ICs from ROHM Semiconductor – EEJournal
Contributes to minimizing standby power and improving reliability in home appliances

Kyoto, Japan and Santa Clara, CA, Sept. 24, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — ROHM announces the availability of BM1ZxxxFJ, integrated zero cross detection IC series, optimized for home appliances such as vacuum cleaners, washing machines, and air conditioners.

...

 

Key Features

[10mW and reduced component count, increased reliability and more precise, near replacement of current ZCD, voltage clamp]

 

Availability: In Mass Production

Pricing: From 0.98USD/sample (excluding tax)

...

6 models are offered to ensure compatibility with a wide range of home appliances.

...

 

Sales Launch Date: Available Now

Online Distributors: Digi-Key, Mouser

Support Pagehttps://www.rohm.com/products/power-management/ac-voltage-zero-cross-detection-ics
(A user’s manual for the evaluation board is also available)

...

 

Attachments

...

 


https://www.mouser.com/Search/Refine?Keyword=bm1z0

https://www.mouser.com/Search/Refine?Keyword=bm1z1

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

The Industry’s First Integrated Zero Cross Detection ICs from ROHM Semiconductor – EEJournal
Contributes to minimizing standby power and improving reliability in home appliances

That's a strange part, as it has no mains isolation - so is only suitable for host-side controllers. (and costs more than many MCUs) 

Usually vendors make that lack of galvanic isolation very clear, but ROHM were a bit lazy there....

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Ah, the low power mode I wrote is the setting item of the oscillator.

 

 

 

Last Edited: Wed. Oct 7, 2020 - 02:45 AM
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An ESP32 for the Wi-Fi :

Connect Microchip AVR128DA48 to Medium One IoT Cloud | Bench Talk (Mouser Electronics)

by Greg Toth

October 6, 2020

[mid-page]

Using Your Own AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano

To use your own AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano with the Medium One IoT Platform, check out our step-by-step article that walks you through the entire process of:

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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SYST-24BOHD857 | Product Change Notification | Microchip

 

Date

14-Oct-2020

 

PCN Type

Silicon Die Revision

 

Microchip has released a new Product Documents for the AVR128DB28/32/48/64 Silicon Errata and Data Sheet Clarifications of devices. If you are using one of these devices please read the document located at AVR128DB28/32/48/64 Silicon Errata and Data Sheet Clarifications.

...

 

Description of Change: Initial release of this document with Silicon die revisions A4 and A5.
 

...

 

Estimated First Ship Date: 20 Oct 2020

 

...

 

Revision History:
August 27, 2020: 
Initial document release
October 14, 2020: Re-issued Errata document PCN to specify the silicon die revisions A4 and A5.

 

...

 

edit :

AVR128DB28/32/48/64 Silicon Errata and Data Sheet Clarifications

 

edit2 : PDF

AVR128DB28/32/48/64 Silicon Errata and Data Sheet Clarifications

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Nov 12, 2020 - 04:16 AM
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Date

20-Oct-2020

PCN Type

Document Change

PCN

SYST-19LAID193

Title

ERRATA - AVR128DB28/32/48/64 Silicon Errata and Data Sheet Clarifications

Product Category

8-bit Microcontrollers

Affected CPNs

SYST-19LAID193_Affected_CPN_10202020.pdf

SYST-19LAID193_Affected_CPN_10202020.csv

Attachments

AVR128DB28/32/48/64 Silicon Errata and Data Sheet Clarifications

 

...

 

Description of Change:

Added errata:
1) Device: Increased Current Consumption May Occur When VDD Drops 
2) CLKCTRL: The PLL Will Not Run When Using XOSCHF With an External Crystal 3) TCB: CCMP and CNT Registers Operate as 16-Bit Registers in 8-Bit PWM Mode 4) TCD: Asynchronous Input Events Not Working When TCD Counter Prescaler is Used and CMPAEN Controls All WOx For Alternative Pin Functions

Updated errata:
1) CCL: The CCL Must be Disabled to Change the Configuration of a Single LUT and The LINK Input Source Selection for LUT3 is Not Functional on 28- and 32- pin Devices 2) ZCD: All ZCD Output Selection Bits are Tied to the ZCD0 Bit

Added data sheet clarification:
Added Typical Characteristics section with additional plots for OPAMP peripheral.

 

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Microchip Announces Microcontrollers that Solve Tough Analog System Design Challenges | Microchip Technology

Chandler, Arizona

October 20, 2020

...

Addressing this challenge through a focus on increased microcontroller (MCU) integration, Microchip Technology Inc. (Nasdaq: MCHP) today announced the PIC18-Q41 and AVR DB MCU families that are the first to combine advanced analog peripherals and multi-voltage operation with inter-peripheral connections for increased system integration and reduced signal acquisition times, and offer the convenience and efficiency of operating in a single design environment.

 

...

 

Mixed-signal IoT systems often include multiple power domains, and the AVR DB MCU simplifies the challenges of these designs while reducing cost by integrating true bi-directional level shifters. This feature lowers cost in a wide range of applications including automotive, appliances, HVAC and liquid measurement. The addition of three independent and highly configurable Op Amps, a 12-bit differential ADC, 10-bit DAC, three zero cross detectors and Core Independent Peripherals (CIPs) makes the AVR DB MCU ideal for virtually any application involving analog signal conditioning and processing functions.

 

Development Support

...

In addition to MCC, the AVR DB is supported by Atmel START, Atmel Studio and third-party tools such as IAR and the GCC C compiler. MCC and START help analog and digital designers easily configure an Op Amp system for various typical use cases through a graphical user interface with no coding required.

Both MCU families offer a compact, cost-effective development board with programming and debugging capabilities: the PIC18F16Q41 Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kit (EV26Q64A) and the AVR DB Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kit (EV35L43A). Quick start guides for the PIC MCU and the AVR MCU are available to start projects immediately.  

 

Pricing and Availability

The PIC18-Q41 and AVR DB MCUs are offered in a range of memory sizes, packages and price points. The PIC18-Q41 pricing starts at $0.65 in 10,000-unit quantities. The AVR DB pricing starts at $0.95 in 10,000-unit quantities.

 

...

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

Microchip Announces Microcontrollers that Solve Tough Analog System Design Challenges | Microchip Technology

The PIC18-Q41 and AVR DB MCUs are offered in a range of memory sizes, packages and price points. The PIC18-Q41 pricing starts at $0.65 in 10,000-unit quantities. The AVR DB pricing starts at $0.95 in 10,000-unit quantities.

...

 

The PIC18-Q41 are interesting reading, and overlap somewhat with the 14p and 20p versions of the AVR DD family.

 

PIC18-Q41 are 64MHz and have opamps and comparators, whilst AVR DD is only 24MHz.

 

PIC18-Q41 PLL spec is a little confusing, as it specs

PLL Output   Frequency Stability    -0.25 — 0.25 %  

so maybe that's not a true Analog PLL/VCO at all, but instead a digital locked scheme that uses the RC oscillator trim bits to wobble about an average ?

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Who-me wrote:
PIC18-Q41 are 64MHz and have opamps and comparators, whilst AVR DD is only 24MHz.

 

IIRC, PICs require four cycles per instruction whilst AVRs are as low as one (due to the instruction pipeline, etc). So a 64MHz PIC is equivalent to a 16MHz AVR.

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though PIC are accumulator-based

 

P.S.

Would be interesting to update the following to MPLAB XC8 v2 for PIC18-Q41 as that's based on Clang (LLVM)

https://www.eembc.org/viewer/?benchmark_seq=1559

via CPU Performance Benchmark – MCU Performance Benchmark – CoreMark – EEMBC Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I wish they would do some that can operate at 5V and have USB. That's my dream MCU at the moment, 5V and XMEGA architecture with USB.

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gchapman wrote:

Would be interesting to update the following to MPLAB XC8 v2 for PIC18-Q41 as that's based on Clang (LLVM)

 

There is some interesting benchmarking on this site...

 

https://dannyelectronics.wordpre...

https://dannyelectronics.wordpre...

 

...just two examples, there are others.

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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AVRs will look bad in terms of ISR latency until Microchip adopts a recent version of avr-gcc with the ISR prologue/epilogue fix (v8+ IIRC).

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yes

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Headsup.. Parametric search on microchip site does not correspond to datasheet for this series on many of the features. Makes parametric search worthless unfortunately.

Also... regarding errata "The CCL Must be Disabled to Change the Configuration of a Single LUT"...
I cant believe this is not fixed, I reported this when CCL on TinyAvr1 and TinyAvr0 was released years ago. They must have copied and pasted old die code/verilog/vhdl or something into the new design. Very disappointing, I remember working around that issue was a pain.

Last Edited: Tue. Oct 27, 2020 - 06:06 AM
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El Tangas wrote:

AVRs will look bad in terms of ISR latency until Microchip adopts a recent version of avr-gcc with the ISR prologue/epilogue fix (v8+ IIRC).

 

If you want low latency then assembler is probably mandatory. Using C risks creating problems that can be difficult to test for.

 

To be honest I don't find these kinds of comparisons very useful. Interrupt latency depends a lot on other factors like if you have variable execution time instructions, or how fast you can wake up from sleep modes, what oscillators are available, what your maximum clock rate is etc.

 

Performance wise you are often interested in power consumption too. Something may take fewer cycles but does it use more energy? Can you just crank the clock rate up to get the speed you need?

 

I'm uneasy about how Xmega seems to have been purged from the parametric search and most of the website. These new parts are nice but not really replacements for Xmega, e.g. no USB.

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mojo-chan wrote:
I'm uneasy about how Xmega seems to have been purged from the parametric search ...
XMEGA are present.

mojo-chan wrote:
These new parts are nice but not really replacements for Xmega, e.g. no USB.
and no DMA (in PIC18-Q41) though is difficult to fit DMA into a single cycle computer architecture.

USB is a medium complexity peripheral (die space, give and take)

 


AVR MCUs | Microchip Technology

  • Quick Reference Guide (top of right column)
  • Parametric Search, Show ALL Products, Max CPU Speed of 32MHz

 

Direct Memory Access | Microchip Technology

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

...and no DMA (in PIC18-Q41) though is difficult to fit DMA into a single cycle computer architecture.

 

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Thank you for I wasn't clear (maybe I need some Grammarlywink

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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yes

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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I'm not sure how the benchmark managed to get 23 cycles latency for the tiny85.

That seems longer than I'd expect if the code ends up in-lined in the ISR function, but shorter than I'd expect if there was an additional function call...

 

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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