waterproof connectors

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Hi there - for a personal project I want to find some connectors that don't mind getting rained on. They will need to carry 4 or 5 electrical signals, two or three are low current (ma) and the remaining 2 are higher current (1A). They will be rained on, and also will be subjected to salt and occasionally oil. (they will be on a bicycle that is used year round in Boston)

I'd like them to be able to cinch up around a round, jacketed cable. The smaller the better, and the lighter the better.

Any suggestions? Lemo makes some good waterproof connectors - but at $50 a pop or so they're a bit rich for my blood. I've seen various others - but everything is just massive... I'm hoping to find something like a round connector a 15mm or less in diameter. Also, Ideally there would be bulkhead mount versions available.

Thanks!

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Leon Heller G1HSM

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I was going to suggest the same. DigiKey has some of them.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Though those look like they'd do just fine - they're way bigger than I want - I'm really hoping to be at about half an inch or less diameter and they're over an inch!

Any other ideas?

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Oh, yes....

19mm (about 3/4") gets you up to 12 circuits. 4-8 circuits are rated at 5A per pin.

Slightly larger than hoped for, but still pretty good.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Hmm I missed that. I can't believe how expensive the contacts are. They're more than a dollar each, when the entire connector (without contacts) is $5. (see here: http://dkc3.digikey.com/PDF/T091... )

So it'd end up being about $10/connector. Pretty spendy for just a plastic connector, when I can go with Lemo parts for about $20 each with nice brass construction...

Anybody know of anything else?

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mini-C for NMEA 2000.
Cheaper than Lemo, dunno!

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Check these out from JST.

http://www.jst-mfg.com/product/detail_e.php?series=151

You can order samples direct from their web site. http://www.jst.com You can even order terminated samples so long as you don't mind any color wire.

If you use a JST on the opposite end, they will make you 4 or 5 whole harnesses for free.

These are available in wire to wire and wire to board.

Good luck,

Mike.

official AVR Consultant
www.veruslogic.com

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I've also used waterproof inline automotive fuses as an in-line quick disconnect connector before. Cheap and available at your nearby automotive parts store...

JC

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gr82bdad wrote:
Check these out from JST.

http://www.jst-mfg.com/product/detail_e.php?series=151

You can order samples direct from their web site. http://www.jst.com You can even order terminated samples so long as you don't mind any color wire.

If you use a JST on the opposite end, they will make you 4 or 5 whole harnesses for free.

These are available in wire to wire and wire to board.

Good luck,

Mike.


Ah - I'm familiar with the JST parts. We used them on a previous project. They don't have any sort of cable strain relief - the seal is made to the individual conductors. It'd work OK, but I'd really prefer something that actually seals to my cable jacket.

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How about finding a connector who's size you can live with and then packing it with silicone dielectric grease? Use some heat shrink tubing tubing to seal the wires to the connectors.

Cars use this stuff for moisture resistance on numerous connectors.

Greg

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If you can use something automotive, you will piggyback on that volume and get much lower prices. It may also be useful to consider 4 or 5 single-contact "connectors" instead of a single multi-contact one except that you seem to want to seal on the wire jacket.

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Hello,

Digikey has a bunch of "splash-proof" connectors, that might work quite well.

I'm a huge fan of the connectors on this page: http://dkc3.digikey.com/PDF/C091...

See the next page for sealing backshells & stuff... make sure you get the seals that go in the connector too!

Also check out http://dkc3.digikey.com/PDF/C091... - look a bit before & after that page too.

There are again some low-cost automotive ones that might work...

-Colin

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Hey, Colin -

All this reading and I missed those. I can use some of them!

Thanks
Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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c_oflynn wrote:
Hello,

Digikey has a bunch of "splash-proof" connectors, that might work quite well.

I'm a huge fan of the connectors on this page: http://dkc3.digikey.com/PDF/C091...

See the next page for sealing backshells & stuff... make sure you get the seals that go in the connector too!

Also check out http://dkc3.digikey.com/PDF/C091... - look a bit before & after that page too.

There are again some low-cost automotive ones that might work...

-Colin


Colin - those Tyco ones are a little hefty (nearly an inch in diameter). However, those Switchcraft parts look pretty decent. I also found some nice looking Hirose parts. Hmmm... decisions decisions...

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Quote:
How about finding a connector who's size you can live with and then packing it with silicone dielectric grease? Use some heat shrink tubing tubing to seal the wires to the connectors.

Cars use this stuff for moisture resistance on numerous connectors.

That is what I would do, worked fine on my '75 Ford pickup's electronic ignition 8-)

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

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So I've ordered up some Hirose HR30 connectors to take a look at. Too bad they're only IP67 rated, but in all honesty that's probably enough for me.

Greg - if I didn't plan on using these connectors very often I'd probably do that - but I think these will be unplugged and plugged pretty regularly. So combined with road grit... that'd get icky real quick!

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Don't know where to get them, but this seems good: http://www.whiteproducts.net/

Also found something at a webshop for EFI stuff: http://shop.vems.hu/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=1_5&products_id=82&osCsid=cb9bce85dc016bb8177ca568ce819a88

JHJ

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www.milspecwest.com

They have great bulk discounts.

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I hope their response to customer enquiries is speedier than this!

 

surprise

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