Under what circumstances would you *NOT* want to use the BOD?

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I am wondering why wouldn't any AVR design not desire to enable the BOD feature?  I can see no disadvantage.

Thoughts?

Jim

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BOD use power, so battery powered things could benefit from having it disabled. 

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AVR180: External Brown-out Protection

 

improved threshold accuracy

reduced current consumption and/or increased BOD speed

some external BOD add features (reset button, LVD in addition to AVR VCC BOD, watchdog)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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8 - Most Brown-Out Reset Circuits Don't Work

[a periodic battery test]

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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why wouldn't any AVR design not desire to enable the BOD feature

If you are an extremest, you can have fun seeing how low the voltage can go before your avr coo-coo clock goes hyawier  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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I appreciate the information.  Thanks

Jim

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sparrow2 wrote:
BOD use power, so battery powered things could benefit from having it disabled. 

...which is why newer generations have addressed that, at least somewhat, with "sleeping BOD" or similar.

 

So to delve further, the discussion must involve the particular AVR model.

 

I had a few apps with small batteries, and it was scary to save those uA by not using BOD.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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gchapman wrote:

8 - Most Brown-Out Reset Circuits Don't Work

[a periodic battery test]

 

I read the linked article and it led to Texas Instruments'

Application Report SLVA139 from 2003, titled Reverse

Current/Battery Protection Circuits, and includes these

circuits as alternatives to using a diode in series with the

battery (the diodes shown below are actually part of the

FETs):

 

Reverse Battery Protection Using a FET

 

Sorry if I'm hijacking the thread with this question, so

please split it to a different thread if necessary.  These

circuits look to be too simple!  Can you actually just use

a single FET like this?  Or are other components needed

for a robust design?  Does anybody have a reference to

a more recent document showing current best practices?

 

--Mike

 

EDIT: clarifications

 

Last Edited: Tue. Jul 16, 2019 - 01:33 AM
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No answers to your questions though a different tack (cell holders)

Memory Protection Devices Corporate Home | MemoryProtectionDevices.com | MPD

[search box at top right; keywords are reverse, polarity]

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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 Or are other components needed for a robust design? 

You'd at least want to add a resistor and zener to protect the gate from inadvertent excess voltage, though some fets include this as well. 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Do you happen to have a part number for a FET which

would be good to use with a 9V battery?

 

--Mike